The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (2024)

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (1)

Morrison & Foerster LLPCorporate Finance Practice

The Proxy Season Field GuideSixth Edition

The P

roxy

Seaso

n F

ield

Guid

e S

ixth E

ditio

nM

orrison & Foerster LLP

/ Corporate Finance P

racticeT

he P

roxy

Seaso

n F

ield

Guid

e S

ixth E

ditio

nM

orrison & Foerster LLP

/ Corporate Finance P

ractice

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (2)

THE PROXY SEASONFIELD GUIDESixth Edition

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (3)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo-rate Finance Practice of Morrison & Foerster LLP.

The MoFo Proxy Season Field Guide was produced and edited by David M.Lynn, Co-Chair of the Corporate Finance Practice. Mr. Lynn’s practice is focused onadvising a wide range of clients on SEC matters, securities transactions and corporategovernance. Mr. Lynn previously served as Chief Counsel of the U.S. Securities andExchange Commission’s Division of Corporation Finance. Mr. Lynn co-authored TheExecutive Compensation Disclosure Treatise and Reporting Guide, and serves asEditor of TheCorporateCounsel.net and The Corporate Counsel.

ABOUT MORRISON & FOERSTER

We are Morrison & Foerster—a global firm of exceptional credentials. With morethan 1,000 lawyers in 17 offices in key technology and financial centers in the UnitedStates, Europe and Asia, our clients include some of the largest financial institutions,investment banks, and Fortune 100, technology and life science companies. We havebeen included on The American Lawyer’s A-List for 12 consecutive years, and in 2015we were again named to the Corporate Board Member list of “America’s Best Corpo-rate Law Firms.” Our lawyers are committed to achieving innovative and business-minded results for our clients, while preserving the differences that make us stronger.

Because of the generality of The Proxy Season Field Guide, the informationprovided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted

upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (4)

ABOUT RR DONNELLEY FINANCIAL SERVICES

RR Donnelley is the preferred global provider of financial disclosure solutionsand analytics, helping our clients efficiently meet their regulatory obligations andmake more informed business decisions.

With a global network of service professionals and innovative technology, ourorganization is uniquely poised to redefine the compliance, disclosure and financialanalytics sectors.

• Unparalleled EDGAR Filing Expertise – Handling more than 160,000 SECfilings annually – 10-K, 10-Q, DEF14A, 8-K, S-1, S-4, S-3 – more than anyother filing agent

• XBRL Filing Experience – Tagging more than 60,000 SEC filings to date,including transactional registration statements requiring XBRL

• Deal Leadership – Bringing the world’s largest financial transactions tomarket – IPOs, mergers and acquisitions, bankruptcy/restructuring andleveraged buyout transactions

• Extensive Distribution Network – Delivering content across 14 time zones, 4continents, and nearly 40 countries

• Financial Stability – An $11.6 billion Fortune 500 company founded in 1864

• Venue® Virtual Data Rooms – Providing secure document storage – facilitat-ing Regulatory Compliance activities, M&A Due Diligence, Fundraising &LP reporting, Board of Director communications and IPOs

• ActiveDisclosureSM – Built around Microsoft Office® productivity tools, RRDonnelley’s comprehensive disclosure management solution works the wayyou do

• Proxy Solutions – Delivering proxy statement design, production and filingas well as end-to-end annual meeting services to over 1,900 U.S. companiesannually

For more information, visit:financial.rrd.comactivedisclosure.comvenue.rrd.com

RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (5)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i

CHAPTER 1 THE LEGISLATIVE AND REGULATORY DEVELOPMENTSSHAPING THE PROXY SEASON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Advisory Votes on Executive Compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2Compensation Committees and Compensation Consultants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6Expanded Compensation Disclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14Additional Governance Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23SEC Staff Guidance for Proxy Advisors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26SEC Staff Guidance on Shareholder Proposals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

CHAPTER 2 SAY-ON-PAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33Advisory Votes on Executive Compensation – Rules and Guidance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34The Dodd-Frank Act Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34Say-on-Pay Votes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35Say-on-Frequency Votes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37Additional Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38Say-on-Golden Parachute Vote . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40Smaller Reporting Companies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43Interaction with the TARP Say-on-Pay Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48The Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48The Say-on-Pay Experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52Disclosure for Say-on-Pay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53Say-on-Pay Engagement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55Say-on-Frequency Recommendations and Voting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57Considerations for the Frequency of the Say-on-Pay Vote . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57Say-on-Golden Parachute Compensation Disclosure and Voting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60Say-on-Pay Lawsuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61Proxy Statement Litigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62Annotated Model Say-on-Pay and Say-on-Frequency Proposals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66Model Say-on-Pay and Say-on-Frequency Board Resolutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71

CHAPTER 3 KEY DISCLOSURE CONSIDERATIONS FOR PROXYSTATEMENTS AND ANNUAL REPORTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77

SEC Review Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78SEC Comments on Executive Compensation Disclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78Trends in Executive Compensation Comments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80Comments and Interpretations on Corporate Governance Disclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83Areas of Focus in SEC Comments on Annual Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96Management’s Discussion and Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96Loss Contingency Disclosures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98Disclosure Controls and Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99Risk Factors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (6)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

Exhibits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100Restatements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100Segment Disclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102Additional SEC Interpretive Guidance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102Changes to the SEC’s Review Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119Audit Committee Disclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120Director Election Voting Standard Disclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123SEC Enforcement Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

CHAPTER 4 SHAREHOLDER ACTIVISM AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE . . 130Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131Shareholder Proposals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131Trends in Shareholder Proposals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131Proxy Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132Key Proxy Adviser Voting Guidelines for 2014 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136Glass Lewis Updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136ISS Updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138Hedging and Pledging Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142

CHAPTER 5 FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT SHAREHOLDERPROPOSALS AND PROXY ACCESS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148

Shareholder Proposals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149Shareholder Proposals Generally . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149The Eligibility and Procedural Requirements of Rule 14a-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151The Substantive Bases for Exclusion of Shareholder Proposals Under Rule 14a-8 . . . . . . . 156Proxy Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166

APPENDIX A (Compliance Checklist) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1APPENDIX B (Annotated Model Directors and Officers Questionnaire) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (7)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The 2016 proxy season occurs in an environment of heightened shareholder acti-vism and an ever-increasing focus on compensation and corporate governance dis-closures. This Proxy Season Field Guide provides you with an overview of recentlegislative, regulatory and shareholder developments, and provides guidance on howthese developments will impact you in the 2016 proxy season.

THE LEGISLATIVE AND REGULATORY DEVELOPMENTS SHAPING THE

PROXY SEASON

On July 21, 2010, President Obama signed into law what was called the mostsweeping set of financial reforms since the Great Depression, the Dodd-Frank WallStreet Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 (the “Dodd-Frank Act”). Whilethis legislation focused principally on changes to the financial regulatory system, sev-eral corporate governance and compensation provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act targetpublic companies. The corporate governance and compensation provisions include:

• A requirement that public companies solicit an advisory vote on executivecompensation (“Say-on-Pay”), an advisory vote on the frequency of Say-on-Pay votes (“Say-on-Frequency”) and, in the event of a merger or otherextraordinary transaction, an advisory vote on certain “golden parachute”payments (“Say-on-Golden Parachutes”);

• Requirements that the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) adoptrules directing the securities exchanges to adopt listing standards withrespect to compensation committee independence and the use of consultants;

• Provisions calling for the SEC to adopt expanded disclosure in the annualproxy statement and other filings, particularly in the area of executive com-pensation, such as disclosure of pay versus performance, the ratio of CEOpay to the pay of a median employee, and policies with regard to hedgingtransactions conducted by employees and directors; and

• Provisions that require the adoption or revision of certain other policies, suchas compensation recovery policies providing for the recovery of executivecompensation in the event of a financial restatement.

The SEC and the stock exchanges are working to adopt a number of new rulesand standards in order to implement the requirements of the Dodd-Frank Act discussedabove. Several of the key provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act will be in place for the2016 proxy season, with many issuers facing their sixth year of Say-on-Pay votes.

iRR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (8)

SAY-ON-PAY

The implementation of Say-on-Pay votes was one of the most widely anticipatedcorporate governance developments in the United States over the past five years.Advocates for Say-on-Pay in the United States hoped that the advisory votes on execu-tive compensation would serve to encourage greater accountability for executivecompensation decisions, as well as more focused compensation disclosure in proxystatements and expanded shareholder engagement. In many ways, these objectiveshave been realized as Say-on-Pay has matured.

The SEC rules for Say-on-Pay provide:

• Issuers must provide a separate shareholder advisory vote in proxy state-ments to approve the compensation of executives not less than every threeyears. Shareholders must vote, on an advisory basis, to approve the compen-sation of the issuer’s named executive officers, as such compensation is dis-closed under Item 402 of Regulation S-K, including the CompensationDiscussion and Analysis (“CD&A”), the compensation tables, and othernarrative executive compensation disclosures required by Item 402. The ruledoes not require issuers to use any specific language or a specific form ofresolution; however an Instruction to the Rule provides a non-exclusiveexample of a form of resolution;

• Issuers must provide a separate shareholder advisory vote in proxy state-ments for annual meetings to determine whether the vote on the compensa-tion of executives will occur every 1, 2, or 3 years. This Say-on-Frequencyvote is required not less frequently than once every six years;

• Issuers must explain in the proxy statement the general effect of the Say-on-Pay votes (i.e., the vote is non-binding), and also must disclose, when appli-cable, the current frequency of Say-on-Pay votes and when the next Say-on-Pay vote will occur;

• Say-on-Pay and Say-on-Frequency votes do not trigger the filing of a prelimi-nary proxy statement with the SEC;

• Issuers are able to exclude shareholder proposals that would provide a Say-on-Pay vote, seek future Say-on-Pay votes, or relate to the frequency of Say-on-Pay votes in certain circ*mstances when, in the most recent Say-on-Frequency vote, a single frequency received a majority of votes cast and theissuer adopted a policy for the frequency of Say-on-Pay votes that is con-sistent with that choice;

iiRR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (9)

• The CD&A must disclose whether and, if so, how the issuer has consideredthe results of the most recent shareholder advisory vote on executivecompensation in determining compensation policies and decisions and, if so,how that consideration has affected the issuer’s compensation decisions andpolicies; and

• Issuers must report, pursuant to Item 5.07 of Form 8-K, the decision as tohow frequently the issuer will conduct its Say-on-Pay votes following eachSay-on-Frequency vote. If the information is provided by amendment to theForm 8-K, the amendment is due no later than 150 calendar days after thedate of the end of the annual meeting in which the Say-on-Frequency voteoccurred, but in no event later than 60 calendar days prior to the deadline forthe submission of shareholder proposals for the next annual meeting as dis-closed in the proxy materials for the meeting at which the Say-on-Frequencyvote occurred.

During the 2015 proxy season, only 64 issuers failed to achieve majority share-holder support for mandatory Say-on-Pay resolutions. The high level of shareholdersupport for Say-on-Pay resolutions during the 2015 proxy season was very similar tothe experience for issuers that conducted Say-on-Pay votes over the past five years. Inthe vast majority of those situations, shareholders have provided strong support forSay-on-Pay proposals, absent some significant concerns with the company’s executivecompensation programs. Even with the likelihood of shareholder support relativelyhigh for Say-on-Pay resolutions, companies have paid very close attention to themessage communicated through their CD&A and other disclosures, while at the sametime seeking to engage with key shareholder constituencies.

A key agenda item for the compensation committee remains the consideration ofthe outcome of the most recent Say-on-Pay vote. This is because a “mandatory”CD&A item requires that an issuer must address whether and, if so, how the issuer hasconsidered the results of the most recent Say-on-Pay vote in determining compensa-tion policies and decisions and, if so, how that consideration has affected the compa-ny’s executive compensation decisions and policies. An issuer that failed to achievemajority support or that received majority support but less than 70%-75% in supportfor the Say-on-Pay proposal likely needs to make substantial disclosures regarding theengagement efforts that the issuer undertook to understand the reasons for the lack ofsupport, the consideration by the compensation committee of the vote and the resultsof the engagement efforts, and the specific steps undertaken with the executive com-pensation program that responded to shareholders’ concerns. While the early share-holder engagement efforts were often reactive, recent proxy seasons have been

iiiRR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (10)

characterized by much more proactive engagement efforts, utilizing “road show” meet-ings, conference calls, and perhaps even electronic communications to more effec-tively engage with shareholders.

When drafting the proxy statement for 2016, the same focus on transparency andcommunicating an effective message that characterized the last few proxy seasonsshould carry through. It remains critically important for the CD&A to reflect the nota-ble aspects of the compensation policies and decisions, while highlighting the pay-for-performance aspects of compensation plans.

KEY DISCLOSURE CONSIDERATIONS FOR PROXY STATEMENTS AND

ANNUAL REPORTS

The SEC Staff (the “Staff”) has come to expect that issuers are aware of the inter-pretive positions taken by the Staff in comment letters on filings, which often reflectnuanced readings of the rules or require more detailed disclosure than might otherwisebe expected. It has become increasingly important that issuers make themselves famil-iar with Staff comment letters that have been issued to other issuers, so that they canrespond to the issues raised in those letters when preparing their own filings.

Over the past several years, the SEC has provided significant guidance withrespect to its interpretation of executive compensation disclosure rules, includingnumerous Staff speeches, interpretations and comments on individual filings. Thereare a number of significant areas of focus in Staff comments and other interpretiveguidance on executive compensation disclosure. For example, the Staff has repeatedlystated that an issuer’s CD&A should focus on how and why the issuer arrived atspecific executive compensation decisions and policies and should address whyspecific compensation decisions were made. Other principal areas of Staff comment inthe CD&A have related to the disclosure of incentive plan performance targets,individual performance goals and benchmarking practices or processes.

Areas of frequent Staff comment in annual reports have addressed disclosure ofgoodwill impairment charges, loss contingency disclosures, liquidity, debt covenants,disclosure controls and procedures, cybersecurity risks, risk factors, restatements andexhibits. Over the past several years, the SEC has also provided interpretive guidanceoutside of the comment process in several key areas relevant to preparing Form 10-Ksand proxy statements, including guidance on non-GAAP measures, the discussion ofliquidity and funding risks in the Management’s Discussion and Analysis of FinancialCondition and Results of Operations (“MD&A), cybersecurity risks, European sover-eign debt exposures, disclosures under Section 13(r) of the Securities Exchange Act of1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”) and audit committee disclosures.

ivRR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (11)

SHAREHOLDER ACTIVISM AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

Continued shareholder concerns over corporate governance and executive com-pensation issues will shape the outcome of votes in the 2016 proxy season. Issuers willneed to continue to focus on voting policies of institutional shareholders and proxyadvisory services when making corporate governance and executive compensationdecisions. Shareholder proposals in 2015 focused on:

• Proxy access shareholder proposals;

• Compensation-related proposals (i.e., pay-for-performance, clawbacks,compensation consultants, and conflicts of interest);

• Majority voting for directors (particularly at Russell 3000 companies);

• Shareholder ability to call special meetings and take action by written con-sent;

• Declassified board of directors;

• Disclosure, limits, board oversight, and shareholder approval or ratificationof political contributions and lobbying; and

• Split chairman/CEO proposals.

Up until the 2015 proxy season, many issuers had been taking a “wait-and-see”approach with respect to amending their bylaws to permit proxy access in order toallow greater flexibility in responding to future shareholder proposals. In November2014, the Comptroller of the City of New York, on behalf of the New York City pen-sion funds, launched a large-scale campaign for the 2015 proxy season targeting 75issuers with a proxy access shareholder proposal. The campaign is called the“Boardroom Accountability Project,” and targeted the 75 issuers based on the Comp-troller’s three “priority” issues. The Comptroller’s office has indicated this initiative ispart of a wider effort to implement universal proxy access through private ordering.Proxy access remains as one of the key corporate governance issues for the 2016 proxyseason.

Institutional Shareholder Services (“ISS”), the leading proxy advisory firm,released 2016 updates to its U.S. proxy voting guidelines, addressing, among otherissues, director overboarding, unilateral board actions, compensation of externallymanaged issuers and proxy access .

The proxy advisory service Glass Lewis also recently updated its voting policiesto address policies regarding, among other issues, conflicting management and share-

vRR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (12)

holder proposals, exclusive forum provisions, environmental and social risk oversight,nominating committee performance and director overboarding.

CONCLUSION

The 2016 proxy season will continue to present challenges for issuers as theyseek to obtain strong support for their Say-on-Pay votes, while at the same timeremaining attentive to ongoing shareholder concerns regarding corporate governanceand executive compensation. This Proxy Season Field Guide will provide you with theresources necessary to successfully navigate the proxy season.

viRR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (13)

CHAPTER 1

THE LEGISLATIVE ANDREGULATORY DEVELOPMENTSSHAPING THE PROXY SEASON

1RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (14)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

THE LEGISLATIVE AND REGULATORY DEVELOPMENTSSHAPING THE PROXY SEASON

On July 21, 2010, President Obama signed into law what was called the mostsweeping set of financial reforms since the Great Depression, the Dodd-Frank Act.The Dodd-Frank Act focuses principally on changes to the financial regulatory system;however, several corporate governance and compensation provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act target public companies. The corporate governance and compensationprovisions include:

• A requirement that public companies solicit a Say-on-Pay vote, a Say-on-Frequency Vote and, in the event of a merger or other extraordinary trans-action, a Say-on-Golden Parachute vote;

• Requirements that the SEC adopt rules directing the securities exchanges toadopt listing standards with respect to compensation committeeindependence and the use of consultants;

• Provisions calling for the SEC to adopt expanded disclosure requirementsfor the annual proxy statement and other filings, particularly in the area ofexecutive compensation; and

• Provisions that will require the adoption or revision of certain other policies,such as compensation recovery policies providing for the recovery of execu-tive compensation in the event of a financial restatement.

The SEC and the stock exchanges are working to adopt a number of new rulesand standards in order to implement the requirements of the Dodd-Frank Act discussedabove.

ADVISORY VOTES ON EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

Say-on-Pay and Say-on-Frequency

For larger public issuers, beginning with shareholder meetings occurring on orafter January 21, 2011, Section 951 of the Dodd-Frank Act required that issuersinclude a resolution in their proxy statements asking shareholders to approve, in a non-binding vote, the compensation of their executive officers, as disclosed under Item 402of Regulation S-K. A separate resolution is also required to determine whether thisSay-on-Pay vote takes place every one, two, or three years.

2RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (15)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

On January 25, 2011, the SEC adopted rules implementing Say-on-Pay and therelated advisory vote on executive compensation provisions. The new rules andamendments to existing rules became effective on April 4, 2011, except that the Say-on-Golden Parachute requirements became effective for filings made on or afterApril 25, 2011, for all issuers.

A complete description of these rules, rule amendments and applicable SEC andStaff interpretations is provided in Chapter 2.

The applicable rules and rule amendments are as follows:

• Rule 14a-21(a) requires that issuers must provide a separate shareholderadvisory vote in proxy statements to approve the compensation of executivesnot less than every three years. In accordance with Section 14A(a)(1) of theSecurities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), share-holders must vote, on an advisory basis, to approve the compensation of theissuer’s named executive officers, as such compensation is disclosed underItem 402 of Regulation S-K, including the CD&A, the compensation tablesand other narrative executive compensation disclosures required byItem 402. The rule does not require issuers to use any specific language or aspecific form of resolution; however, an Instruction to Rule 14a-21 providesa non-exclusive example of a form of resolution. The shareholder vote mustrelate to all executive compensation disclosure set forth pursuant to Item 402of Regulation S-K, with the exception of disclosure provided pursuant toparagraph (s) of Item 402 of Regulation S-K and director compensationrequired by paragraph (k) or (r) of Item 402 of Regulation S-K;

• Rule 14a-21(b) requires that issuers provide a separate shareholder advisoryvote in proxy statements for annual meetings to determine whether the voteon the compensation of executives required by Section 14A(a)(1) of theExchange Act “will occur every 1, 2, or 3 years.” This Say-on-Frequencyvote is required not less frequently than once every six years;

• Item 24 of Schedule 14A requires disclosure that the issuer is providing thevote pursuant to Section 14A of the Exchange Act, as well as an explanationof the general effect of the Say-on-Pay votes (i.e., the vote is non-binding).Issuers also must disclose, when applicable, the current frequency of Say-on-Pay votes and when the next Say-on-Pay vote will occur;

• Rule 14a-6(a) includes Say-on-Pay and Say-on-Frequency votes in the list ofitems that do not trigger the filing of a preliminary proxy;

3RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (16)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

• A Note to Rule 14a-8(i)(10) permits the exclusion of a shareholder proposalthat would provide a Say-on-Pay vote, seek future Say-on-Pay votes, orrelate to the frequency of Say-on-Pay votes in certain circ*mstances. Suchshareholder proposals could be excluded under the Note if, in the mostrecent Say-on-Frequency vote, a single frequency received a majority ofvotes cast and the issuer adopted a policy for the frequency of Say-on-Payvotes that is consistent with that choice. For the purposes of this Note, theSEC states that an abstention would not count as a vote cast;

• An amendment to Item 402(b) of Regulation S-K requires an issuer toaddress, in the CD&A, whether and, if so, how the issuer has considered theresults of the most recent shareholder advisory vote on executive compensa-tion (as required by Exchange Act Section 14A or Exchange Act Rule 14a-20, which is the rule governing Say-on-Pay votes required for recipients offinancial assistance under the Troubled Asset Relief Program, or “TARP”)in determining compensation policies and decisions and, if so, how thatconsideration has affected the issuer’s compensation decisions and policies.This requirement is included among the “mandatory” CD&A disclosureitems specified by Item 402(b)(1) of Regulation S-K; and

• An amendment to Item 5.07 of Form 8-K requires that an issuer must dis-close its decision as to how frequently the issuer will conduct Say-on-Payvotes following each Say-on-Frequency vote. In order to comply with thisrequirement, an issuer must disclose the determination in the original Form8-K or file an amendment to its original Form 8-K filing (or filings) thatdisclosed the preliminary and final results of the Say-on-Frequency vote.The Form 8-K amendment is due no later than 150 calendar days after thedate of the end of the annual meeting in which the Say-on-Frequency voteoccurred, but in no event later than 60 calendar days prior to the deadline forthe submission of shareholder proposals as disclosed in the proxy materialsfor the meeting at which the Say-on-Frequency vote occurred. Specificallywith respect to Say-on-Frequency votes, an issuer must disclose the numberof votes cast for each of the choices, as well as the number of abstentions inItem 5.07 of Form 8-K.

Say-on-Golden Parachutes

Rule 14a-21(c) provides that if a solicitation is made by an issuer for a meeting ofshareholders at which the shareholders are asked to approve an acquisition, merger,

4RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (17)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

consolidation, or proposed sale or other disposition of all or substantially all of theassets of the issuer, the issuer must provide a separate shareholder vote to approve anyagreements or understandings and compensation disclosed pursuant to Item 402(t) ofRegulation S-K. Consistent with Exchange Act Section 14A(b), any agreements orunderstandings between an acquiring company and the named executive officers of theissuer, where the issuer is not the acquiring company, are not required to be subject tothe separate shareholder advisory vote.

If any of the agreements or understandings contemplated in Rule 14a-21(c) pre-viously have been subject to a shareholder advisory vote or the Say-on-Pay vote, thena separate shareholder vote is not required at the time of the vote on the merger orother similar extraordinary transaction. If there are changes to the arrangements afterthe date of the annual meeting or if new arrangements are adopted that were not sub-ject to a prior Say-on-Pay vote, then a Say-on-Golden Parachutes vote is still required.In that case, the vote is required only with respect to the amended golden parachutepayment arrangements.

The SEC adopted Item 402(t) of Regulation S-K, which requires disclosure ofnamed executive officers’ golden parachute arrangements in a proxy statement forshareholder approval of a merger, sale of a company’s assets, or similar transactions.This disclosure is only required in annual meeting proxy statements when an issuer isseeking to rely on the exception from a separate merger proxy shareholder vote byincluding the proposed Item 402(t) disclosure in the annual meeting proxy statementsoliciting a Say-on-Pay vote. The disclosure includes a table labeled “Golden Para-chute Compensation,” as well as detailed narrative disclosure about the arrangementspursuant to which the compensation is to be paid. The disclosure is also required undera variety of rules and forms; however, the SEC made clear that Item 402(t) disclosureis not required in third-party bidders’ tender offer statements, so long as the subjecttransactions are not also Exchange Act Rule 13e-3 going-private transactions.

5RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (18)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

COMPENSATION COMMITTEES AND COMPENSATION CONSULTANTS

The Dodd-Frank Act requires that stock exchange listing standards prescribe thatcompensation committee members be independent in light of the Dodd-Frank Actstandards and that a compensation committee may only select compensation con-sultants, legal counsel, or other advisers after taking into consideration independencestandards established by the SEC. The Dodd-Frank Act requires that theseindependence factors include:

• The provision of other services by the person that employs the adviser;

• The amount of fees received as a percentage of an entity’s total revenue;

• Policies and procedures designed to prevent conflicts of interest;

• Any business or personal relationship of the adviser with a member of thecompensation committee; and

• Any stock of the company owned by an adviser.

Further, the compensation committee must be vested with direct authority for theappointment, compensation, and oversight of the work of the consultant.

Enhanced disclosure is also required by the SEC, addressing whether the compen-sation committee retained or obtained the advice of a compensation consultant andwhether the consultant’s work raised any conflicts of interest, the nature of any suchconflict, and how it was addressed. In December 2009, the SEC adopted rules requir-ing disclosure of fees paid to compensation consultants when they provide executivecompensation consulting and additional services.

SEC Rulemaking

On June 20, 2012, the SEC adopted Rule 10C-1, which directs the national secu-rities exchanges to adopt listing standards requiring that each member of a compensa-tion committee must be an independent member of the board of directors. Neither theDodd-Frank Act nor the SEC’s final rule specifically define independence for thispurpose, however consistent with Section 10C of the Exchange Act, the national secu-rities exchanges must consider: (1) the sources of compensation of the director, includ-ing any consulting, advisory or other compensatory fee paid by the company to thedirector and (2) whether the director is affiliated with the company or any of its sub-sidiaries or their affiliates.

6RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (19)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

The SEC provided the national securities exchanges with more discretion in set-ting the definition of independence than is currently available with respect to theindependence of audit committee members as required pursuant to the Section 10A(m)of the Exchange Act. The SEC did not adopt any additional factors to be considered bythe national securities exchanges in establishing their listing standards. The SEC didnot adopt any “look back” period to be applied with respect to the independencedetermination, leaving it to the national securities exchanges to determine whether toadopt a look back period.

Rule 10C-1 also directs the national securities exchanges to prohibit the listing ofan equity security of an issuer that is not in compliance with the following standards:

• The compensation committee, in its sole discretion, must have authority toobtain or retain the advice of compensation advisers;

• The compensation committee must be directly responsible for the appoint-ment, retention, compensation and oversight of the work of any compensa-tion advisers; and

• The issuer must provide the appropriate funding for the payment of reason-able compensation, as determined by the compensation committee, to thecompensation advisers, if any.

Under the rule as adopted, a compensation committee is expressly permitted to receiveadvice from a non-independent adviser, such as in-house counsel or a compensationconsultant engaged by management. The SEC made clear that the final rule would notrequire that the compensation committee act in accordance with the advice of compen-sation advisers or otherwise affect the ability or obligation of the compensation com-mittee to exercise its own judgment. Further, the final rule and the resulting listingstandards are not intended to preclude the engagement of non-independent legal coun-sel or obtaining advice from in-house or outside counsel retained by the company orthe company’s management.

Rule 10C-1 also directs the national securities exchanges to adopt listing stan-dards requiring that the compensation committee consider the independence factorsspecified in Rule 10C-1, as well as any other relevant factors identified by the nationalsecurities exchanges, prior to engaging any compensation advisers. The SEC did notdefine or provide further clarification regarding any of the factors specified in Sec-tion 10C, however it did adopt one additional factor, which is any business or personal

7RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (20)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

relationships between the company’s executive officers and the compensation adviseror the firm employing the compensation adviser.

Further, in accordance with Section 10C, the SEC adopted an amendment toexpand its current disclosure requirements regarding compensation consultants. TheSEC amended Item 407 of Regulation S-K to specifically require that a company dis-close the nature of any conflict of interest and how it is being addressed if the work ofthe compensation consultant raised a conflict of interest. While the SEC has notdefined what constitutes a conflict of interest, Item 407 provides that the same sixfactors specified in Rule 10C-1 should be considered in determining if a conflict ofinterest exists.

Exchange Listing Standards

Pursuant to Rule 10C-1, the national securities exchanges were directed to pro-vide the SEC with proposed changes to their listing standards related to compensationcommittee and adviser independence. The New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) andNasdaq submitted their proposed changes to the SEC on September 25, 2012. Bothexchanges later submitted amendments to their proposals and the SEC approved theexchanges’ proposals, as amended, on January 11, 2013. Further amendments toNasdaq’s standards were approved in December 2013.

Independence of Compensation Committee Members

Under Rule 10C-1, the exchanges were directed to adopt listing standards relatedto the independence of compensation committee members. Although neither the Dodd-Frank Act nor Rule 10C-1 specifically defines independence for this purpose, the list-ing standards adopted by national securities exchanges must consider:

• The sources of compensation of the director, including any consulting, advi-sory, or other compensatory fee paid by the company to the director; and

• Whether the director is affiliated with the company or any of its subsidiariesor their affiliates.

Rule 10C-1 provided the exchanges with more discretion in setting the definitionof independence than is permitted in determining the independence of audit committeemembers. In its rulemaking, the SEC did not adopt any additional factors to be consid-ered by the exchanges in establishing their listing standards beyond what was requiredunder the Dodd-Frank Act, which left open the possibility that the exchanges would

8RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (21)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

consider and adopt additional relevant factors to be considered when determiningwhether a compensation committee member is independent.

The NYSE and Nasdaq listing standards do not, however, include any additionalcriteria to be considered in determining whether a member of the compensation com-mittee is independent. The commentary to both the NYSE’s and Nasdaq’s proposalsmade clear that in order to be considered independent, members of the compensationcommittee must meet both the general independence criteria already included in theexchanges’ listing standards and the compensation committee-specific criteria requiredby Rule 10C-1.

The new NYSE listing standards provide some guidance as to how issuers shouldapply the two factors listed above in making an independence determination. Withrespect to sources of compensation, the commentary to the NYSE standards instructsthe listed company’s board to consider whether the director receives compensationfrom any person or entity that would impair the director’s ability to make independentjudgments about the listed company’s executive compensation. Similarly, whenconsidering any affiliate relationship, the commentary to the new listing standardsinstructs the board to consider whether there is an affiliate relationship that places thedirector “under the direct or indirect control of the listed company or its seniormanagement, or creates a direct relationship between the director and members ofsenior management, in each case of a nature that would impair his ability to makeindependent judgments about the listed company’s executive compensation.” TheNYSE specifically declined to include a bar on independence based solely on affiliatestatus due to stock ownership.

Nasdaq amended its listing standards in December 2013 to harmonize the compen-sation committee-specific independence standards with these standards adopted by theNYSE. As amended, Nasdaq Rule 5605(d)(2)(A) provides that “in affirmativelydetermining the independence of any director who will serve on the compensationcommittee of a board of directors, the board of directors must consider all factors spe-cifically relevant to determining whether a director has a relationship to the Companywhich is material to that director’s ability to be independent from management inconnection with the duties of a compensation committee member, including, but notlimited to: (i) the source of compensation of such director, including any consulting,advisory or other compensatory fee paid by the Company to such director; and(ii) whether such director is affiliated with the Company, a subsidiary of the Companyor an affiliate of a subsidiary of the Company.” The focus of this analysis is on

9RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (22)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

independence from management, and the revised interpretive material (IM-5605-6)makes clear that compensation must be evaluated in the context of whether it couldaffect judgments regarding executive compensation, noting “[w]hen considering thesources of a director’s compensation for this purpose, the board should considerwhether the director receives compensation from any person or entity that wouldimpair the director’s ability to make independent judgments about the Company’sexecutive compensation.” The revised interpretation also states that when consideringaffiliate relationships, the board should consider whether the affiliate relationshipplaces the director under the “direct or indirect control of the Company or its seniormanagement, or creates a direct relationship between the director and members ofsenior management, in each case of a nature that would impair the director’s ability tomake independent judgments about the Company’s executive compensation.”

Compensation Committee Authority and Funding

Rule 10C-1 also directed the exchanges to prohibit the listing of a security of anissuer that is not in compliance with the following standards:

• The compensation committee, which for this purpose includes those mem-bers of a the board of directors who oversee executive compensation matterson behalf of the board of directors in the absence of a board committee, mustbe directly responsible for the appointment, compensation, and oversight ofthe work of any compensation advisers;

• The compensation committee, in its sole discretion, must have authority toretain or obtain the advice of compensation advisers;

• The issuer must provide the appropriate funding for the payment of reason-able compensation, as determined by the compensation committee, to thecompensation advisers, if any; and

• Before selecting any compensation adviser, the compensation committeemust take into consideration the six independence criteria specified in Rule10C-1 (described below), as well as any additional factors specified in thelisting criteria adopted by the exchanges.

The SEC made clear that Rule 10C-1 does not require that the compensationcommittee act in accordance with the advice of compensation advisers or otherwiseaffect the ability or obligation of the compensation committee to exercise its own

10RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (23)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

judgment. Further, Rule 10C-1 and the resulting listing standards are not intended topreclude obtaining advice from in-house counsel. Rule 10C-1 and both exchanges’listing standards also make clear that while the compensation committee must conductan independence assessment in selecting a compensation adviser, companies may stillretain and seek advice from advisers who are not independent (subject to the newcompensation adviser disclosure requirements in Item 407 of Regulation S-K).

The NYSE and Nasdaq listing standards both require companies to impose therequirements listed above on their compensation committees. The NYSE noted in itscommentary that the required powers of the compensation committee set forth abovehad in significant part already been required by existing NYSE listing standards,which require these powers to be included in the compensation committee charter. Inany case, the NYSE adopted the requirements noted above exactly as they appear inRule 10C-1, and removed the comparable requirements included in existing NYSElisting standards. Nasdaq’s listing standards also require that, subject to certainexceptions described below, listed companies adopt a formal compensation committeecharter that states that the compensation committee will review and reassess theadequacy of the charter on an annual basis.

Compensation Adviser Independence

Rule 10C-1 also directed the exchanges to adopt listing standards requiring thatthe compensation committee consider the independence factors specified in Rule 10C-1, as well as any other relevant factors identified by the exchange, prior to engagingany compensation advisers. The independence criteria specified in Rule 10C-1 are:

• The provision of other services to the company by the firm employing thecompensation adviser;

• The amount of fees received from the company by the firm employing thecompensation adviser, as a percentage of that firm’s total revenue;

• The policies and procedures adopted by the firm employing the compensa-tion adviser that are designed to prevent conflicts of interest;

• Any business or personal relationship of the compensation adviser with amember of the compensation committee;

• The compensation adviser’s ownership of the company’s stock; and

• Any business or personal relationships between the company’s executiveofficers and the compensation adviser or the firm employing the adviser.

11RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (24)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

As with the criteria relating to compensation committee member independence, thenew NYSE and Nasdaq listing standards do not include any additional factors to beconsidered in determining the independence of compensation advisers beyond those inRule 10C-1.

Consistent with the compensation adviser disclosure requirements in Item 407 ofRegulation S-K, the NYSE and Nasdaq listing standards provide that a compensationcommittee is not required to conduct the independence assessment with respect to acompensation adviser that acts in a role limited to (1) consulting on any broad-basedplan that does not discriminate in scope, terms, or operation, in favor of executiveofficers or directors of the registrant, and that is available generally to all salariedemployees or (2) providing information that either is not customized for a particularregistrant or that is customized based on parameters that are not developed by thecompensation consultant, and about which the compensation consultant does not pro-vide advice.

Exemptions and Applicability of Listing Standards

The listing standards for compensation committee member independence andcompensation committee adviser independence do not apply to controlled companies,issuers of securities futures products cleared by a registered clearing agency or a clear-ing agency exempt from registration, or registered clearing agencies that issue stand-ardized options. The following categories of companies are also exempt from thecompensation committee member independence requirements:

• Limited partnerships;

• Companies in bankruptcy proceedings;

• Open-end management investment companies registered under the Invest-ment Company Act of 1940;

• Foreign private issuers that disclose annually why they do not have anindependent compensation committee; and

• Smaller reporting companies.

The NYSE and Nasdaq listing standards both include general exemptions forother categories of issuers that are currently exempt from their existing compensationcommittee requirements. These include passive business organizations and issuerswhose only listed equity security is a preferred stock.

12RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (25)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

The listing standards of both the NYSE and Nasdaq already provide that a foreignprivate issuer may follow its home country’s practice rather than U.S. compensation-related listing standards so long as the issuer discloses in its annual reports filed withthe SEC each requirement that it does not follow and describes the home country prac-tice the issuer follows in lieu of such requirements. Under both the NYSE and Nasdaqlisting standards, a foreign private issuer that follows its home country’s practice inlieu of the requirement to maintain an independent compensation committee must nowalso disclose in its annual reports filed with the SEC the reasons why it does not havesuch a committee.

Under both the NYSE and Nasdaq listing standards, smaller reporting companiesare not required to adhere to the enhanced independence standards for compensationcommittee members or the compensation adviser independence considerations. Nas-daq’s listing standards also permit smaller reporting companies to adopt a board reso-lution that specifies the compensation committee’s responsibilities and authority inlieu of adopting a formal written compensation committee charter. Further, underNasdaq’s listing standards, smaller reporting companies are not required to includelanguage regarding the committee’s authority to retrain compensation advisers in thecompensation committee charter or board resolutions. Under Nasdaq’s listing stan-dards, smaller reporting companies are also exempt from the requirement to review thecompensation committee charter or board resolutions on an annual basis.

Implementation Timeline

Under the NYSE and Nasdaq listing standards, companies had until the earlier of(1) their first annual meeting after January 15, 2014, or (2) October 31, 2014, to com-ply with the compensation committee independence requirements. Issuers wererequired to comply with the other new standards, including those related to the fundingand authority of the compensation committee and the independence of compensationcommittee advisers, by July 1, 2013.

Both the NYSE and Nasdaq listing standards provided listed companies withopportunities to cure compensation committee member independence issues after thestandards went into effect. Under the NYSE listing standards, if a member of a com-pensation committee ceases to be independent for reasons outside the member’sreasonable control, that member may remain on the compensation committee until theearlier of the next annual meeting or one year from the occurrence of the event thatcaused the member to be no longer independent. Notably, however, the cure periodprovided under the NYSE standards is limited to circ*mstances where the compensa-

13RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (26)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

tion committee continues to have a majority of directors who are independent underthe new listing standards. Under the Nasdaq listing standards, the listed company isrequired to cure any noncompliance by the earlier of the next annual shareholdersmeeting or one year from the occurrence of the event that caused the noncompliance.Both exchanges’ listing standards require companies to notify the relevant exchangeupon learning of noncompliance.

The NYSE and Nasdaq listing standards both generally provide a phased-incompliance period for newly listed companies. These issuers are required to have oneindependent compensation committee member at the time of listing, a majority ofindependent compensation committee members within 90 days of listing, and allindependent compensation committee members within one year of listing.

EXPANDED COMPENSATION DISCLOSURE

Several provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act require that the SEC further expand thedisclosure requirements applicable for proxy statements and other filings to addressseveral areas of compensation with respect to employees, executive officers, and direc-tors; including:

• Disclosure of Pay versus Performance – Section 953(a) of the Dodd-FrankAct requires that the SEC adopt rules mandating that issuers disclose therelationship of the compensation actually paid to their executive officersversus the issuer’s financial performance, taking into account changes in thevalue of stock and dividends or distributions. This disclosure may be pre-sented graphically or in narrative form.

• Disclosure of CEO Pay versus Median Employee Pay – Section 953(b) ofthe Dodd-Frank Act requires that the SEC adopt rules mandating disclosureof the median annual total compensation of all employees (except the CEO),the annual total compensation of the CEO, and the ratio of the medianemployee total compensation to the CEO total compensation. Total compen-sation is determined by reference to the “total compensation” column of theSummary Compensation Table.

• Disclosure of Employee or Director Hedging Policies – Section 955 of theDodd-Frank Act directs the SEC to adopt rules mandating disclosure ofwhether any employee or director (or designee of such persons) is permittedto purchase financial instruments, such as prepaid variable forwards, equity

14RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (27)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

swaps, collars, and exchange funds, that are designed to hedge or offset anydecrease in the market value of equity securities granted as compensation orheld directly or indirectly by the employee or director.

The SEC has proposed implementing rules regarding pay versus performance anddisclosure of employee or director hedging policies, and has adopted final rulesregarding CEO pay ratio disclosure.

Pay Versus Performance Disclosure

On April 29, 2015, the SEC proposed rules to implement Section 953(a) of theAct, which were subject to a 60-day comment period that ended on July 6, 2015. Theproposed rules would add new Item 402(v) of Regulation S-K, which would require anissuer to provide a clear description of (1) the relationship between executive compen-sation actually paid to the issuer’s named executive officers and the cumulative totalshareholder return (“TSR”) of the issuer, and (2) the relationship between the issuer’sTSR and the TSR of a peer group chosen by the issuer, over each of the issuer’s fivemost recently completed fiscal years. The proposed disclosure would be required inproxy or information statements for annual meetings of shareholders in which execu-tive compensation disclosure is required. The proposed disclosure would requireissuers to add a new table to their proxy materials with the following information:

• Executive compensation actually paid for the principal executive officer andthe average compensation actually paid to the remaining named executiveofficers;

• The total executive compensation reported in the Summary CompensationTable included under Item 402(c) of Regulation S-K for the principal execu-tive officer and the average of the reported amounts for the remaining execu-tive officers;

• The issuer’s TSR on an annual basis, using the definition of TSR inItem 201(e) of Regulation S-K, which sets forth an existing requirement fora stock performance graph; and

• The TSR on an annual basis of the issuers in a peer group.

15RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (28)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

The new table prescribed by the proposed rules would include executive compen-sation “actually paid” to named executive officers, as defined in Item 402(a)(3) ofRegulation S-K.

• While the proposed rules would require issuers to disclose the executivecompensation actually paid to the principal executive officer, the compensa-tion amounts disclosed for the remaining named executive officers would bethe average compensation actually paid to those executives. Under the pro-posed rules, executive compensation “actually paid” would be calculatedusing compensation that issuers already report in the proxy statement as astarting point. Specifically, compensation “actually paid” pursuant to theproposed rules would equal total compensation, as reported in the SummaryCompensation Table, with certain adjustments relating to pension amountsand equity awards.

• The proposed rules would require that companies use TSR (as defined inItem 201(e) of Regulation S-K) as the measure of financial performance ofthe company for purposes of pay-versus-performance disclosure. Tosupplement the required disclosure, the proposed rules would permit issuersto provide supplemental measures of financial performance, as long as anysuch additional disclosure is clearly identified, not misleading and not pre-sented with greater prominence than the required disclosure.

• Pursuant to the proposed rules, issuers would be required to disclose the rela-tionship between issuer TSR and peer group TSR, in each case over thecompany’s five most recently completed fiscal years, using the peer groupidentified by the issuer in its stock performance graph or in its CD&Aincluded in Item 402(b) of Regulation S-K.

• Issuers would be required to provide the disclosure contemplated by pro-posed rules for the last five fiscal years, except that smaller reportingcompanies would be required to provide disclosure for only the last threefiscal years.

• In addition to providing the tabular and narrative disclosure contemplated bythe proposed rules, issuers would also be required to tag the disclosure in aninteractive data format using eXtensible Business Reporting Language, orXBRL.

16RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (29)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

CEO Pay Ratio Disclosure

On August 5, 2015, the SEC adopted the rules implementing Section 953(b) ofthe Act. The final rule adds new paragraph (u) to Item 402 of Regulation S-K, whichrequires disclosure of the following:

A. The median of the annual total compensation of all employees of the com-pany, except the CEO of the issuer;

B. The annual total compensation of the CEO of the issuer; and

C. The ratio of the amount in (B) to the amount in (A), presented as a ratio inwhich the amount in (A) equals one, or, alternatively, expressed narrativelyin terms of the multiple that the amount in (B) bears to the amount in (A).

The final rule also requires disclosure of the ratio such that the CEO’s annual totalcompensation is always compared to the median employee’s annual total compensa-tion—the ratio must always show how much larger or smaller the CEO’s annual totalcompensation is as compared to the median employee’s annual total compensation.Issuers that are subject to the rule will be required to provide the disclosure startingwith the first fiscal year beginning on or after January 1, 2017. The final rules alsoinclude the following provisions:

• Filings Requiring Pay Ratio Disclosure. The pay ratio disclosure as set forthin the final rule is required in any filing that calls for executive compensa-tion disclosure pursuant to Item 402 of Regulation S-K, including annualreports on Form 10-K and registration statements under the Securities Act of1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), as well as proxy materials to thesame extent that these forms require compliance with Item 402 of Regu-lation S-K. The pay ratio disclosure, as with other Item 402 information, willbe treated as “filed” for purposes of the Securities Act and Exchange Actand, as such, will be subject to potential liabilities under those statutes,including Section 18 liability under the Exchange Act.

• Definition of “Employee.” The final rule defines “employee” to include anissuer’s U.S. and non-U.S. employees, as well as its part-time, seasonal, andtemporary employees employed by the issuer or any of its consolidated sub-sidiaries. Also included in this definition are all of a issuer’s officers, otherthan the CEO. The definition of “employee” does not include independentcontractors or “leased” workers employed by a third party and whose com-

17RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (30)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

pensation is determined by the third party. An issuer can supplement its payratio disclosure or provide additional pay ratios for its shareholders toconsider if it wants to explain the effect of including part-time, seasonal, andtemporary employees on its CEO pay ratio disclosure. The final ruleincludes only employees of consolidated subsidiaries, as determined byreference to applicable accounting standards, rather than employees of allsubsidiaries, as was originally proposed.

• Median Employee Determination Date. The final rule provides flexibility inchoosing the median employee determination date, as opposed to the proposedrule, which proposed to define “employee” as an individual employed as ofthe last date of the company’s last completed fiscal year. The final rule defines“employee” as an individual employed on any date of the issuer’s choosingwithin the last three months of the issuer’s last completed fiscal year. Issuersmust disclose the date used to identify the median employee.

• Exemptions. In response to particular issues and concerns raised during thecomment process, the final rule provides two tailored exemptions from the gen-eral requirement to include all employees located outside of the United States.

• Data Privacy Exemption. The first exemption to the general requirementthat non-U.S. employees be included in the pay ratio disclosure is when ajurisdiction’s data privacy laws or regulations are such that, despite anissuer’s reasonable efforts to obtain or process information necessary tocomply with the rule, it is unable to do so without violating those laws orregulations. For example, the European Union prohibits the transfer ofpersonal data to a third country that does not ensure an adequate level ofprivacy protection; China, Japan, Mexico, Canada, Peru, Australia, Rus-sia, Switzerland, Argentina, and Singapore have adopted or are consider-ing similar rules. To prevent any potential manipulation, issuers arerequired to exercise reasonable efforts to obtain or process theinformation necessary for compliance with the final rule. As part of itsreasonable efforts, the issuer must seek an exemption or other reliefunder the applicable jurisdiction’s governing data privacy laws or regu-lations and use the exemption if granted. If an issuer excludes any non-U.S. employees in a particular jurisdiction under the data privacyexemption, it must exclude all non-U.S. employees in that jurisdiction.Additionally, the issuer must list the excluded jurisdictions, identify the

18RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (31)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

specific data privacy law or regulation, explain how complying with thefinal rule violates the law or regulation (including the efforts made by theissuer to use or seek an exemption or other relief under such law orregulation), and provide the approximate number of employeesexempted from each jurisdiction based on this exemption. The issuermust obtain a legal opinion that opines on the inability of the issuer toobtain or process the information necessary for compliance with the finalrule without violating that jurisdiction’s laws or regulations governingdata privacy, including the issuer’s inability to obtain an exemption orother relief under any governing laws or regulations. The legal opinionmust be filed as an exhibit to any filing in which the pay ratio disclosureis included.

• De Minimis Exemption. The second exemption from the generalrequirement to include non-U.S. employees in identifying the medianemployee is when a de minimis number of an issuer’s employees workoutside the United States. Under the final rule, if an issuer’s non-U.S.employees account for five percent or less of its total employees, it mayexclude all of those employees when making its pay ratio calculations. Ifthe issuer chooses to exclude any non-U.S. employees, it must excludeall of them. If an issuer’s non-U.S. employees exceed five percent of theissuer’s total U.S. and non-U.S. employees, it may exclude up to fivepercent of its total employees who are non-U.S. employees. If an issuerexcludes any non-U.S. employees in a particular jurisdiction, it mustexclude all non-U.S. employees in that jurisdiction. The issuer must alsodisclose the jurisdictions from which its non-U.S. employees are beingexcluded, the approximate number of employees excluded from eachjurisdiction under the de minimis exemption, the total number of its U.S.and non-U.S. employees irrespective of any exemption (de minimis ordata privacy), and the total number of its U.S. and non-U.S. employeesused for its de minimis calculation.

• Cost-of-Living Adjustments. The SEC recognized that differences betweenthe underlying economic conditions of the countries in which companiesoperate likely have an effect on the compensation paid to employees in thosejurisdictions, and therefore the final rule provides issuers with the option ofmaking cost-of-living adjustments to the compensation of their employees injurisdictions other than the jurisdiction in which the CEO resides when iden-

19RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (32)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

tifying the median employee (whether using annual total compensation orany other consistently applied compensation measure). The issuer is requiredto disclose the country in which the median employee is located, brieflydescribe the cost-of-living adjustments it used to identify the medianemployee, and briefly describe the cost-of-living adjustments it used tocalculate the median employee’s annual total compensation, including themeasure used as the basis for the cost-of-living adjustment. To provide con-text for the Item 402(u)(1)(iii) disclosure, an issuer electing to present thepay ratio in this manner must also disclose the median employee’s annualtotal compensation and pay ratio without the cost-of-living adjustments. Tocalculate this pay ratio, the issuer must identify the median employee with-out using any cost-of-living adjustments.

• Replacement of CEO. When an issuer replaces its CEO with another CEOduring its fiscal year, the final rule allows a choice of two options incalculating the annual total compensation for its CEO: (a) an issuer may takethe total compensation calculated pursuant to Item 402(c)(2)(x), andreflected in the Summary Compensation Table, provided to each person whoserved as CEO during the year and combine those figures, which wouldconstitute the company’s annual total CEO compensation; or (b) an issuermay look to the CEO serving in that position on the date it selects to identifythe median employee and annualize that CEO’s compensation. An issuermust disclose which option it chooses, and how it calculates its CEO’sannual total compensation.

• Additional Information. The final rule includes an instruction stating thatissuers may present additional ratios or other information to supplement therequired ratio, but are not required to do so. Additional pay ratios are notlimited to any particular information, such as pay ratios covering U.S. andnon-U.S. employees. If an issuer includes any additional ratios, the ratiosmust be clearly identified, not misleading, and not presented with greaterprominence than the required ratio.

• Identification of the Median Employee. In order to comply with the finalrule, an issuer must identify the “median employee”—whose compensationwill be used for the annual total compensation calculation—once every threeyears, unless there has been a change in its employee population oremployee compensation arrangements such that the issuer reasonably

20RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (33)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

believes the change would result in a significant change in the pay ratio. Ifthere has been such a change, the issuer must disclose this change, re-identify the median employee, and provide a brief explanation about thereason or reasons for the change. Alternatively, if there has been no suchchange, the issuer must disclose that it is using the same median employee inits pay ratio calculation and describe briefly the basis for its reasonablebelief. For example, the issuer could disclose that there has been no changein its employee population or employee compensation arrangements that itbelieves would significantly affect the pay ratio. If the median employeeidentified in year one is no longer in the same position or no longeremployed by the issuer on the median employee determination date in yeartwo or year three, the final rule permits the issuer to replace its medianemployee with an employee in a similar compensation position.

• Methodology for Identifying the Median Employee. To provide additionaltransparency about how the pay ratio disclosure has been calculated, thefinal rule requires that issuers disclose the date used to identify the medianemployee. Although Section 953(b) of the Act requires that issuers choosethe “median” employee as the point of comparison, rather than the averageor some other measure, the provision did not prescribe a methodology thatmust be used to identify the median. Consistent with the proposal, the finalrule provides issuers with the flexibility to choose a method to identify themedian employee based on their own facts and circ*mstances. Issuers mayuse a methodology that uses reasonable estimates. The median employeemay be identified using annual total compensation, or any other compensa-tion measure that is consistently applied to all employees included in thecalculation, such as information derived from tax and/or payroll records. Inaddition, in determining the employees from which the median is derived, anissuer is permitted to use its employee population or statistical sampling,and/or other reasonable methods. If statistical sampling is used, the SECbelieves that a relatively small sample size may be appropriate in certainsituations, and that reasonable estimates of the median may be determinedusing more than one statistical sampling approach by issuers with multiplebusiness lines or geographical units. Regardless of the calculation methodchosen, the final rule requires that the company briefly describe the method-ology it used to identify the median employee and any material assumptions,adjustments (including any cost- of-living adjustments), or estimates it used

21RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (34)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

to identify the median employee or to determine total compensation or anyelements of total compensation, which shall be consistently applied. Thefinal rule requires issuers to briefly describe and consistently apply anymethodology used to identify the median and any material assumptions,adjustments (including cost-of-living adjustments), or estimates used toidentify the median or to determine total compensation or any elements oftotal compensation. The final rule also requires an issuer to clearly identifyany estimates used. For example, when statistical sampling is used, an issuermust describe the size of both the sample and the estimated whole pop-ulation, any material assumptions used in determining the sample size, andthe sampling method (or methods) used. However, issuers are not required toinclude any technical analyses, formulas, confidence levels, or the steps usedin data analysis.

• Annual Total Compensation. The final rule requires that “annual total com-pensation” for both the median employee and CEO be calculated using therequirements of Item 402(c)(2)(x) of Regulation S-K. This is the case even ifthe issuer has identified the median employee using reasonable estimates ofcompensation based on payroll or tax records. Accordingly, an issuer mustgo through the process of replicating the Summary Compensation Tablecompensation for the median employee, including, for example, the grantdate fair value of equity awards, the incremental change in pension value,and “all other compensation” items such as 401(k) contributions and otherbenefits. The SEC notes in the final rule that any compensation that ispermitted to be excluded from annual total compensation under Item 402 ofRegulation S-K, such as benefits under plans available to all employees, maybe added back into the calculation if necessary to reflect benefits that aresignificant for non-management employees of the issuer. Issuers are permit-ted to use reasonable estimates in calculating the annual total compensationof their median employee, including any elements of the total compensation,but must clearly identify any estimates used and have a reasonable basis toconclude that their estimates approximate the actual amounts ofItem 402(c)(2)(x) compensation, or a particular element of compensationthat is awarded to, earned by, or paid to the median employee. Although thefinal rule allows issuers to identify the median employee every three years, itrequires total compensation for that employee to be calculated each year.Accordingly, following the issuer’s calculation of the median employee’s

22RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (35)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

annual total compensation in year one, it must recalculate the annual totalcompensation for that employee in year two and again in year three.

Employee or Director Hedging Policies Disclosure

On February 9, 2015, the SEC proposed amendments to implement Section 955of the Act. The proposed amendments were subject to a 60-day comment period whichended on April 20, 2015.

The proposal would add new paragraph (i) to Item 407 of Regulation S-K. Pro-posed Item 407(i) would specify the types of transactions that are subject to the dis-closure requirement. The scope of the proposed disclosure requirement would not belimited to any particular types of hedging transactions or instruments, but wouldrequire disclosure of all transactions with economic consequences comparable to thefinancial instruments specified in Section 14(j). Specifically, proposed Item 407(i)would require disclosure of whether an employee, officer, or director, or any of theirdesignees, is permitted to purchase financial instruments (including prepaid variableforward contracts, equity swaps, collars, and exchange funds) or otherwise engage intransactions that are designed to or have the effect of hedging or offsetting anydecrease in the market value of equity securities (1) granted to the employee or direc-tor by the issuer as part of the compensation of the employee or director; or (2) held,directly or indirectly, by the employee or director.

ADDITIONAL GOVERNANCE REQUIREMENTS

Compensation Recovery

Section 954 of the Dodd-Frank Act requires that stock exchange listing standardsbe amended to require that issuers adopt a policy providing that, if an issuer is requiredto prepare an accounting restatement due to material noncompliance with any financialreporting requirement under the securities laws, it will recover from any current orformer executive officer who received incentive-based compensation (including stockoptions awarded as compensation) during the three-year period preceding the date onwhich the issuer is required to prepare an accounting restatement, amounts based onthe erroneous data, in excess of what would have been paid under the restatement.Additional disclosure will also be required of an issuer’s policy on incentive-basedcompensation that is based on financial information required to be reported under thesecurities laws.

23RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (36)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

On July 1, 2015, the SEC proposed rules to implement Section 954 of the Act.The proposed rules were subject to a 60-day comment period that ended on Sep-tember 14, 2015.

The proposed rules would require national securities exchanges and associationsto establish listing standards that would require listed companies to adopt and complywith a compensation recovery policy in which:

• Recovery would be required from current and former executive officers whor*ceived incentive-based compensation during the three fiscal years preced-ing the date on which the issuer is required to prepare an accountingrestatement to correct a material error. The recovery would be required on a“no fault” basis, without regard to whether any misconduct occurred or anexecutive officer’s responsibility for the erroneous financial statements.

• Issuers would be required to recover the amount of incentive-based compen-sation received by an executive officer that exceeds the amount the execu-tive officer would have received had the incentive-based compensation beendetermined based on the accounting restatement. For incentive-based com-pensation based on stock price or total shareholder return, issuers could use areasonable estimate of the effect of the restatement on the applicable meas-ure to determine the amount to be recovered.

• Issuers would have discretion not to recover the excess incentive-basedcompensation received by executive officers if the direct expense of enforc-ing recovery would exceed the amount to be recovered.

Under the proposed rules, an issuer would be subject to delisting if it does notadopt a compensation recovery policy that complies with the applicable listing stan-dard, disclose the policy in accordance with SEC rules or comply with the policy’srecovery provisions. The proposed rules also include the following provisions:

• The proposed rules would include a definition of an “executive officer” thatis based on the definition of “officer” under Section 16 under the ExchangeAct. The definition includes the issuer’s president, principal financial officer,principal accounting officer, any vice-president in charge of a principalbusiness unit, division or function, and any other person who performspolicy-making functions for the company.

24RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (37)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

• Under the proposed rules, incentive-based compensation that is granted,earned or vested based wholly or in part on the attainment of any financialreporting measure would be subject to recovery. Financial reporting meas-ures are those based on the accounting principles used in preparing thecompany’s financial statements, any measures derived wholly or in partfrom such financial information, and stock price and total shareholder return.

• Each listed issuer would be required to file its compensation recovery policyas an exhibit to its Exchange Act annual report.

• In addition, if during its last completed fiscal year the issuer either prepareda restatement that required recovery of excess incentive-based compensa-tion, or there was an outstanding balance of excess incentive-based compen-sation relating to a prior restatement, the listed issuer would be required todisclose:

• The date on which it was required to prepare each accounting restate-ment, the aggregate dollar amount of excess incentive-based compensa-tion attributable to the restatement and the aggregate dollar amount thatremained outstanding at the end of its last completed fiscal year.

• The name of each person subject to recovery from whom the issuerdecided not to pursue recovery, the amounts due from each such person,and a brief description of the reason the issuer decided not to pursuerecovery.

• If amounts of excess incentive-based compensation are outstanding formore than 180 days, the name of, and amount due from, each person atthe end of the issuer’s last completed fiscal year.

• The proposed disclosure would be included along with the listed issuer’sother executive compensation disclosure in annual reports, and in any proxyor information statements in which executive compensation disclosure isrequired.

• Listed issuer’s would also be required to block tag the disclosure in an inter-active data format using XBRL.

• Each listed issuer would be required to adopt its recovery policy no laterthan 60 days following the date on which the listing exchange’s listing stan-dard becomes effective. Each listed issuer would be required to recover

25RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (38)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

all excess incentive-based compensation received by current and formerexecutive officers on or after the effective date of Rule 10D-1 that resultsfrom attaining a financial reporting measure based on financial informationfor any fiscal period ending on or after the effective date of Rule 10D-1.

• Listed issuers would be required to comply with the new disclosures inproxy or information statements and Exchange Act annual reports filed on orafter the effective date of the listing exchange’s rule.

Other Governance Provisions

The Dodd-Frank Act includes a number of additional corporate governance provi-sions, including:

• Authorizing the SEC to promulgate “proxy access” rules, allowing specifiedshareholders to include director nominees in the issuer’s proxy materials, butnot prescribing specific standards for those rules (Section 971). The SECissued final rules facilitating shareholder director nominations on August 25,2010, which were scheduled to become effective on November 15, 2010.However, Rule 14a-11 was vacated by U.S. Court of Appeals for the Districtof Columbia Circuit in July 2011;

• Directing the SEC to promulgate rules mandating proxy statement disclosureof the reasons why the issuer has chosen to have one person serve as Chair-man and CEO, or to have different individuals serve in those roles (Section972). The SEC amended its disclosure rules in December 2009 to require adiscussion of this topic and it appears that no further SEC rulemaking will becompleted on this topic; and

• Barring brokers from using discretionary authority to vote proxies in con-nection with election of directors, executive compensation, or other sig-nificant matters, as determined by the SEC (Section 957). Under changesalready adopted by Rule 452 of the rules of the New York Stock Exchange,no broker discretionary voting is permitted for the election of directors andexecutive compensation matters.

SEC STAFF GUIDANCE FOR PROXY ADVISORS

The SEC’s Division of Investment Management and Division of CorporationFinance published Staff Legal Bulletin No. 20 on June 30, 2014 regarding investmentadvisers’ responsibilities in voting client proxies, and two exemptions from the federal

26RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (39)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

proxy rules that are often relied upon by proxy advisory firms. The Staff noted that theguidance may require investment advisers and proxy advisory firms to make changesto their systems and processes. In this regard, the Staff stated its expectation that thesechanges should be made in advance of the 2015 proxy season.

Investment Advisers

Staff Legal Bulletin No. 20 provides the following guidance for investmentadvisers:

• Compliance with fiduciary duty. An investment adviser’s fiduciary dutiesrequire that adviser to cast proxy votes in a manner that is in accordancewith the clients’ best interests and the adviser’s proxy voting procedures.The Staff provided examples of how to demonstrate compliance with thisobligation, including: (1) sampling proxy votes to ensure they comply withproxy voting policies; (2) reviewing sample proxy votes to determine if theissues require more analysis; and (3) confirming at least annually, as part ofan ongoing compliance program, that the investment adviser’s proxy votingpolicies are being implemented effectively and continue to be designed toprovide that proxies are voted in the best interests of clients

• Voting every proxy not required. Advisers and their clients may agree bycontract on the manner in which they will delegate proxy voting authority.Some arrangements may provide for the adviser not to assume all proxyvoting authority. Examples of these arrangements include, among otherthings: (1) a client may agree that the benefits may not justify the time andcost of evaluating certain proposals or issuers; (2) a client may agree that theadviser may vote all proposals consistent with management’s recom-mendations or in favor of all proposals made by a particular shareholderproponent, absent a contrary instruction for the client or a determination bythe adviser that voting a different way would further the clients’ investmentstrategies (3) a client may agree that the adviser will abstain from voting anyproxies, whether or not the client chooses to vote them; and (4) a client mayagree that the adviser will focus resources only on particular types of pro-posals based on the client’s preference.

• Selecting a proxy advisory firm. Investment advisers should establish andimplement measures reasonably designed to identify and address the proxy

27RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (40)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

advisory firm’s conflicts that can arise on an ongoing basis. For example, theadviser could require the proxy advisory firm to update the investmentadviser of business changes the investment adviser considers relevant (i.e.,with respect to the proxy advisory firm’s capacity and competency to pro-vide proxy voting advice) or conflict policies and procedures.

• Ongoing oversight of proxy advisory firms. Advisers should implementpolicies and procedures that are reasonably designed to provide sufficientongoing oversight of the proxy advisory firm to ensure that the investmentadviser, acting through the proxy advisory firm, continues to vote proxies inthe best interests of its clients. Advisers should determine that the proxyadvisory firm has the capacity and competency to adequately analyze proxyissues, including the ability to make voting recommendations based onmaterially accurate information that it receives and analyzes.

Proxy Advisory Firms

Staff Legal Bulletin No. 20 provides the following guidance for proxy advisoryfirms:

• Application of proxy rules to proxy advisory firms. Generally, proxy advi-sory firms are subject to federal proxy rules, because their advice constitutesa “solicitation” of proxies; however, proxy advisory firms are exempt fromthe information and filing requirements if they comply with the requirementsof exemptions contained in Rule 14a-2(b).

• Applicability of Rule 14a-2(b)(1). Rule 14a-2(b)(1) generally exempts per-sons who do not seek the power to act as a proxy for a security holder. Proxyadvisory firms would not be able to rely on this exemption if they allow theclient to establish, in advance of receiving proxy materials for particularshareholder meetings, general guidelines or policies that the proxy advisoryfirm will apply to vote on behalf of the client (even where the authority wasrevocable by the client).

• Applicability of Rule 14a-2(b)(3). Rule 14a-2(b)(3) generally exempts per-sons that furnish proxy voting advice to another person with whom a busi-ness relationship exists, subject to conditions. A business relationshipincludes, for example, providing financial advice in the ordinary course ofbusiness, provided that the proxy advice is incidental to this relationship anddoes not involve special compensation. A proxy advisory firm must first

28RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (41)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

determine whether it has a significant relationship with an issuer or a secu-rity holder proponent or whether it has a material interest in the proxy pro-posal, and what constitutes “significant” or a “material interest” will dependon the facts and circ*mstances. A proxy adviser must clearly disclose to theclient whether it has a “significant relationship or material interest” thatcould present a conflict of interest, and in this regard boilerplate disclosureswill not be sufficient. Disclosure of a significant relationship or materialinterest is an affirmative duty; it is not sufficient to provide disclosures onlyupon request. Further, disclosure should be made publicly or in such a wayas to allow the client to assess the nature of the significant relationship orinterest.

SEC STAFF GUIDANCE ON SHAREHOLDER PROPOSALS

On October 22, 2015, the Staff of the SEC’s Division of Corporation Financeissued Staff Legal Bulletin No. 14H (“SLB 14H”), which provided the Staff’s viewsregarding the application of Rule 14a-8(i)(9) (proposals that “directly conflict” withmanagement proposals) and Rule 14a-8(i)(7) (proposals relating to “ordinary businessoperations”), which are two important substantive bases for the omission of a proposalfrom an issuer’s proxy materials.

Rule 14a-8(i)(9) Guidance

Rule 14a-8(i)(9) permits an issuer to omit a proposal submitted by an eligibleshareholder from the issuer’s proxy statement if the shareholder proposal “directlyconflicts” with a management proposal set forth in the same proxy statement. Rule14a-8(i)(9) has been used in recent years to exclude shareholder proposals addressingtopics such as compensation plan provisions, proxy access, shareholders’ ability to calla special meeting, and shareholders’ ability to take action by written consent. The SEChas stated that the subject proposals need not be “identical in scope or focus” in orderfor this basis for exclusion to be available. See SEC Release No. 34-40018 (May 21,1998). Consistent with the SEC’s position, the Staff has historically concurred thatwhere a shareholder proposal and a management proposal present alternative and con-flicting decisions for shareholders, and where submitting both proposals could provideinconsistent and ambiguous results, the shareholder proposal could be excluded underRule 14a-8(i)(9).

On January 16, 2015, Chair Mary Jo White directed the Division of CorporationFinance to review the proper scope and application of Rule 14a-8(i)(9), and the Staff

29RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (42)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

thereafter announced that it would express no view on no-action requests relating tothe exclusion of shareholder proposals in reliance on Rule 14a-8(i)(9). Without havingthe ability to seek the Staff’s concurrence to exclude a shareholder proposal based onRule 14a-8(i)(9), issuers pursued a number of alternative methods for addressingshareholder proposals that conflicted with management proposals. The most commonalternative methods were (i) including both the shareholder proposal and the manage-ment proposal in the proxy statement, with an explanation to shareholders regardingany differences in scope of applicability and recommending that shareholders vote infavor of the management proposal; and (ii) including only the shareholder proposal,and recommending that shareholders vote against that proposal.

In SLB 14H, the Staff expressed the view that there is a “direct conflict” betweena shareholder proposal and management proposal only where “a reasonable share-holder could not logically vote in favor of both proposals, i.e., a vote for one proposalis tantamount to a vote against the other proposal.” The Staff noted that this analysis“more appropriately focuses on whether a reasonable shareholder could vote favorablyon both proposals, or whether they are, in essence, mutually exclusive proposals.” Incommunicating this interpretation, the Staff focused on the principle that Rule 14a-8(i)(9) is designed to ensure that the shareholder proposal process is not used as ameans to circumvent the SEC’s proxy rules governing solicitations.

In SLB 14H, the Staff provided the following examples to provide a better under-standing of the Staff’s focus on “whether a reasonable shareholder could logically votefor both proposals.”

• Direct Conflict Exists. The Staff stated that (i) “where a company seeksshareholder approval of a merger, and a shareholder proposal asks share-holders to vote against the merger;” or (ii) “a shareholder proposal that asksfor the separation of the company’s chairman and CEO would directly con-flict with a management proposal seeking approval of a bylaw provisionrequiring the CEO to be the chair at all times,” the Staff “would agree thatthe proposals directly conflict.”

• Direct Conflict Does Not Exist. In illustrating those circ*mstances in whicha direct conflict would not exist for purposes of Rule 14a-8(i)(9), the Staffprovided the following examples: (i) “if a company does not allow share-holder nominees to be included in the company’s proxy statement, a share-holder proposal that would permit a shareholder or group of shareholders

30RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (43)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

holding at least 3% of the company’s outstanding stock for at least 3 years tonominate up to 20% of the directors would not be excludable if a manage-ment proposal would allow shareholders holding at least 5% of the compa-ny’s stock for at least 5 years to nominate for inclusion in the company’sproxy statement 10% of the directors;” and (ii) “a shareholder proposal ask-ing the compensation committee to implement a policy that equity awardswould have no less than four-year annual vesting would not directly conflictwith a management proposal to approve an incentive plan that gives thecompensation committee discretion to set the vesting provisions for equityawards.” The Staff noted that these situations would not present a “directconflict” because “a reasonable shareholder, although possibly preferringone proposal over the other, could logically vote for both.”

With respect to the proxy access example described above, the Staff stated thatthere would be no direct conflict because “both proposals generally seek a similarobjective, to give shareholders the ability to include their nominees for director along-side management’s nominees in the proxy statement, and the proposals do not presentshareholders with conflicting decisions such that a reasonable shareholder could notlogically vote in favor of both proposals.” The Staff analyzed the compensation exam-ple similarly, stating that “a reasonable shareholder could logically vote for a compen-sation plan that gives the compensation committee the discretion to determine thevesting of awards, as well as a proposal seeking implementation of a specific vestingpolicy that would apply to future awards granted under the plan.”

The Staff noted that SLB 14H could impose “a higher burden for some compa-nies seeking to exclude a proposal to meet than had been the case under our previousformulation.” As a result, issuers may turn to Rule 14a-8(i)(10) in seeking to exclude ashareholder proposal that is very similar to a management proposal or action. Rule14a-8(i)(10) provides an exclusion from an issuer’s obligation to include shareholderproposals from eligible shareholders in the issuer’s proxy statement if the issuer’sexisting policies and practices “substantially implement” the shareholder proposal.

Rule 14a-8(i)(7) Guidance

Rule 14a-8(i)(7) provides that a proposal is excludable when the proposal dealswith a matter relating to the company’s ordinary business operations. A recent ThirdCircuit Court of Appeals decision in Trinity Wall Street v. Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. heldthat an issuer could exclude a shareholder proposal from its proxy materials based on

31RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (44)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

Rule 14a-8(i)(7), but raised some questions as to the proper framework for analysisunder Rule 14a-8(i)(7). Notwithstanding the fact that the outcome of the Third Circuitdecision was in line with the Staff’s earlier conclusions in the same matter, the Staffexpressed a concern in SLB 14H that the decision could lead to the unwarrantedexclusion of a shareholder proposal. In this regard, SLB 14H specifically addressed theThird Circuit’s majority ruling regarding the “significant policy issue” exception to theordinary business exclusion, which described a two-part test under which “a share-holder must do more than focus its proposal on a significant policy issue; the subjectmatter of its proposal must ‘transcend’ the company’s ordinary business.” The Staffnoted that the court “found that to transcend a company’s ordinary business, the sig-nificant policy issue must be ‘divorced from how a company approaches the nitty-gritty of its core business.’” The Staff concluded that it would continue to follow theone-part “ordinary business” analysis that it has historically applied, based on theSEC’s view (which was articulated by the concurring judge in the Third Circuit deci-sion) that proposals focusing on a significant policy issue are not excludable under theordinary business exception “because the proposals would transcend the day-to-daybusiness matters and raise policy issues so significant that it would be appropriate for ashareholder vote.” As a result, the Staff indicates in SLB 14H that “a proposal maytranscend a company’s ordinary business operations even if the significant policy issuerelates to the ‘nitty-gritty of its core business.’”

32RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (45)

CHAPTER 2

SAY-ON-PAY

33RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (46)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

SAY-ON-PAY

ADVISORY VOTES ON EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION – RULES AND GUIDANCE

INTRODUCTION

Say-on-Pay was one of the most highly anticipated corporate governancedevelopments in the United States. Say-on-Pay has been utilized in other jurisdictions,such as in the United Kingdom, where Say-on-Pay encouraged greater engagementbetween issuers and institutional investors over compensation and governance issues.Advocates of Say-on-Pay in the United States hoped that the advisory votes willencourage greater accountability for executive compensation decisions through adirect shareholder referendum, more focused disclosure in proxy statements and sig-nificantly expanded shareholder engagement.

The Say-on-Pay and Say-on-Frequency requirements were effective for largerpublic companies for annual meetings on or after January 21, 2011. The SEC’simplementing rules, adopted on January 25, 2011, became effective on April 4, 2011(with the exception of golden parachute requirements, which became effective for fil-ings made on or after April 25, 2011). Smaller reporting companies were exempt fromthe Say-on-Pay and Say-on-Frequency vote requirements until the first annual meetingor other meeting of shareholders occurring on or after January 21, 2013.

THE DODD-FRANK ACT REQUIREMENTS

Section 951 of the Dodd-Frank Act, which added Section 14A to the ExchangeAct, requires that issuers include a resolution in their proxy statements (at least onceevery three years) asking that shareholders approve, in a nonbinding vote, thecompensation of the executive officers, as disclosed under Item 402 of RegulationS-K, the Say-on-Pay vote.

A separate resolution is required (at least once every six years) to determinewhether the Say-on-Pay vote takes place every one, two, or three years—the Say-on-Frequency vote. Those issuers that conducted their first Say-on-Frequency vote imme-diately after the enactment of the Dodd-Frank Act will be required to conduct a Say-on-Frequency vote again in the 2017 proxy season.

If golden parachute compensation has not been approved as part of a Say-on-Payvote, then issuers must solicit shareholder approval of golden parachute compensation

34RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (47)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

through a separate nonbinding vote at the meeting where the shareholders are asked toapprove a merger or similar extraordinary transaction that would trigger paymentsunder the “golden parachute” provisions, the Say-on-Golden Parachute vote.

Section 14A also requires that any proxy statement used for soliciting the Say-on-Golden Parachute vote must include “clear and simple” disclosure of the golden para-chute arrangements or understandings and the amounts payable.

In order to implement these requirements, the SEC adopted, in SEC ReleaseNo. 33-9178 (January 25, 2011) (the “Adopting Release”), new Exchange ActRule 14a-21, which governs advisory votes on executive compensation going forward(with the exception of those issuers that have indebtedness outstanding under theTARP program, who must solicit annual Say-on-Pay votes under the EmergencyEconomic Stabilization Act, as amended (“EESA”), and Exchange Act Rule 14a-20).The SEC also adopted a number of additional rule, form and schedule changes toaccommodate the new Say-on-Pay, Say-on-Frequency and Say-on-Golden Parachutevotes.

SAY-ON-PAY VOTES

Rule 14a-21(a) provides that if a solicitation is made by an issuer relating to anannual or other meeting of shareholders at which directors will be elected and forwhich the SEC’s rules require executive compensation disclosure pursuant to Item 402of Regulation S-K, then the issuer must conduct a Say-on-Pay vote, and a Say-on-Payvote must occur thereafter no later than the annual or other meeting of shareholdersheld in the third calendar year after the immediately preceding Say-on-Pay vote. TheSay-on-Pay vote relates to the executive compensation disclosure required to beincluded in the proxy statement, which generally includes the CD&A, the compensa-tion tables, and the narrative disclosure on executive compensation.

The SEC states in footnote 18 of the Adopting Release that it views Section 951of the Dodd-Frank Act as requiring a separate shareholder vote on executivecompensation only with respect to “an annual meeting of shareholders for which prox-ies will be solicited for the election of directors, or a special meeting in lieu of suchannual meeting.” Accordingly, Rules 14a-21(a) and 14a-21(b) (governing the Say-on-Frequency vote, as discussed below) are intended to apply in connection with the elec-tion of directors when the related proxy materials must include executivecompensation disclosure.

35RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (48)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

The key Say-on-Pay rules and interpretations are as follows:

• Director Compensation and Risk Disclosure Not Covered. Instruction 1 toRule 14a-21 provides that the Say-on-Pay vote does not cover directorcompensation disclosed pursuant to paragraphs (k) and (r) of Item 402 ofRegulation S-K, as well as any disclosure pursuant to Item 402(s) of Regu-lation S-K about the issuer’s compensation policies and practices as theyrelate to risk management and risk-taking incentives. However, if riskconsiderations are a material aspect of the issuer’s compensation policies ordecisions for named executive officers, then the Instruction indicates that thecompany must discuss these considerations as part of the CD&A, and suchdisclosure will then be subject to the Say-on-Pay vote.

• Wording of the Say-on-Pay Resolution. Rule 14a-21(a) does not require thatissuers use a specific form of resolution. However, the Instruction to Rule14a-21(a) provides the following nonexclusive example that would satisfythe requirements of the rule: “RESOLVED, that the compensation paid tothe company’s named executive officers, as disclosed pursuant to Item 402of Regulation S-K, including the Compensation Discussion and Analysis,compensation tables and narrative discussion, is hereby APPROVED.”

While the SEC has provided this nonexclusive example of a form of reso-lution, the SEC states in the Adopting Release that issuers “should retainthe flexibility to craft the resolution language.” Issuers have adopteddiffering language in order to present their Say-on-Pay vote, includinglanguage that is not presented as a resolution to be adopted by share-holders.

In Exchange Act Rules Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations Ques-tion 169.05, the Staff has indicated that it is permissible for the Say-on-Pay vote to omit the words, “pursuant to Item 402 of Regulation S-K,”and to replace those words with a plain English equivalent, such as“pursuant to the compensation disclosure rules of the Securities andExchange Commission, including the compensation discussion and analy-sis, the compensation tables and any related material disclosed in thisproxy statement.”

• Wording of the Description of the Say-on-Pay Proposal on the Proxy Card.In Exchange Act Rules Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations Ques-

36RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (49)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

tion 169.07, the Staff notes that an issuer’s proxy card and voting instructionform should not describe the advisory vote to approve executive compensa-tion with the language “to hold an advisory vote on executivecompensation,” and should rather use formulations such as: “to approve thecompany’s executive compensation;” “advisory approval of the company’sexecutive compensation;” “advisory resolution to approve executivecompensation;” or “advisory vote to approve named executive officercompensation.” The Staff states that impermissible example referencedabove would not be consistent with Rule 14a-21 because it is not clear fromthe description as to what shareholders are being asked to vote on.

SAY-ON-FREQUENCY VOTES

Rule 14a-21(b) provides that if a solicitation is made by an issuer relating to anannual or other meeting of shareholders at which directors will be elected, and forwhich the SEC’s rules require executive compensation disclosure pursuant to Item 402of Regulation S-K, then that issuer must conduct a Say-on-Frequency vote for its firstannual or other meeting of shareholders occurring on or after January 21, 2011, andthat such Say-on-Frequency vote must occur thereafter no later than the annual orother meeting of shareholders held in the sixth calendar year after the immediatelypreceding Say-on-Frequency vote. An issuer could hold a Say-on-Frequency votemore frequently than every six years if it elects to do so.

The key Say-on-Frequency rules and interpretations are as follows:

• Say-on-Frequency Choices. Under Rule 14a-21(b), the required Say-on-Frequency resolution must ask shareholders to indicate whether future Say-on-Pay votes should occur every one, two or three years. As a result,shareholders are given four choices on the proxy card: whether the Say-on-Pay vote will take place every one, two, or three years, or to abstain fromvoting on the resolution. In order to implement the voting choices for theSay-on-Frequency vote, the SEC amended Exchange Act Rule 14a-4 tospecifically allow proxy cards to reflect the choices of one, two, or threeyears, or abstain.

• Wording of the Say-on-Frequency Resolution. Rule 14a-21(b) does notrequire that issuers use a specific form of resolution. Unlike the Say-on-Payvote requirement in Rule 14a-21(a), the SEC does not provide a non-exclusive example of a Say-on-Frequency resolution. Exchange Act Rules

37RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (50)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations Question 169.04 indicates thatthe Say-on-Frequency vote need not be set forth as a resolution. Separately,the Staff has informally cautioned that the Say-on-Frequency vote must beclearly stated, and that in this regard it must be clear that shareholders canvote on the options of every one, two or three years (or abstain from voting),rather than solely following management’s recommendation (if any isprovided). Issuers relied on this Staff guidance to provide more Say-on-Frequency votes in a “proposal” format, such as by simply referencing thefour choices that are available on the proxy card. The Staff also indicates inExchange Act Rules Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations Question169.06 that it is permissible for the Say-on-Frequency vote to include thewords “every year, every other year, or every three years, or abstain” in lieuof “every 1, 2, or 3 years, or abstain.”

• Recommendations. Neither Rule 14a-21(b) nor the SEC’s other proxy rulesrequire that an issuer make a recommendation with respect to the Say-on-Frequency vote; however, the SEC notes that proxy holders may vote unin-structed proxy cards in accordance with management’s recommendationonly if the company follows the existing requirements of Rule 14a-4, whichinclude specifying how proxies will be voted (i.e., in accordance with man-agement’s recommendations) in the absence of instruction from the share-holder. Most proxy statements filed in the 2011 proxy season withmandatory Say-on-Frequency votes included a recommendation as to thepreferred frequency of future Say-on-Pay votes, with the majority of thoserecommendations favoring Say-on-Pay votes annually.

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS

The SEC adopted other changes to rules and forms relating to Say-on-Pay andSay-on-Frequency, including:

• No Preliminary Proxy Statement. The SEC amended Exchange Act Rule14a-6(a) to add any shareholder advisory votes on executive compensation,including the Say-on-Pay or Say-on-Frequency votes, to the list of items thatwill not trigger the requirement to file a preliminary proxy statement withthe SEC. This amendment contemplates an advisory vote on executivecompensation that is not required by Section 14A of the Exchange Act.

38RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (51)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

• Proxy Statement Disclosures. Item 24 to Schedule 14A requires disclosure,in the proxy statement in which the issuer is providing a Say-on-Pay, Say-on-Frequency or Say-on-Golden Parachute vote, that the issuer is providingsuch vote as required pursuant to Section 14A of the Exchange Act. Further,the issuer must explain the general effect of such vote, such as that the voteis non-binding. Issuers also must disclose, when applicable, the current fre-quency of Say-on-Pay votes and when the next Say-on-Pay vote will occur.

• CD&A Disclosure. Amended Item 402(b)(1) of Regulation S-K requires anissuer to address in its CD&A whether and, if so, how the issuer has consid-ered the results of the most recent shareholder advisory vote on executivecompensation (as required by Section 14A of the Exchange Act or ExchangeAct Rule 14a-20, which is the rule governing Say-on-Pay votes required forrecipients of financial assistance under TARP) in determining compensationpolicies and decisions and, if so, how that consideration has affected theissuer’s compensation decisions and policies. This requirement is includedamong the “mandatory” CD&A disclosure items specified by Item 402(b)(1)of Regulation S-K.

• Item 5.07 Form 8-K. Item 5.07 of Form 8-K, as amended, requires that anissuer must disclose its decision as to how frequently the issuer will conductSay-on-Pay votes following each Say-on-Frequency vote. If an issuer doesnot disclose the issuer’s frequency determination in its initial Item 5.07 Form8-K, then the issuer must file an amendment to its prior Form 8-K filing (orfilings) that disclose the preliminary and final results of the Say-on-Frequency vote. The Form 8-K amendment is due no later than 150 calendardays after the date of the end of the annual meeting in which the Say-on-Frequency vote occurred, but in no event later than 60 calendar days prior tothe deadline for the submission of shareholder proposals as disclosed in theproxy materials for the meeting at which the Say-on-Frequency voteoccurred. An issuer must disclose in Item 5.07 of Form 8-K the number ofvotes cast for each of the choices of every one, two or three years, as well asthe number of abstentions.

• Substantially Implemented Shareholder Proposals. The SEC added a Note toExchange Act Rule 14a-8(i)(10) to permit the exclusion of a shareholderproposal as “substantially implemented” if the proposal would provide for aSay-on-Pay vote, seek future Say-on-Pay votes, or relate to the frequency of

39RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (52)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

Say-on-Pay votes. Such shareholder proposals may be excluded under thenew Note if, in the most recent Say-on-Frequency vote, a single frequencyreceived a majority of the votes cast and the issuer adopted a policy for thefrequency of Say-on-Pay votes that is consistent with that choice. The Staffhas noted that this Note will also apply to shareholder proposals seekingvotes on matters that are already “subsumed” within the Say-on-Pay or Say-on-Frequency vote, not just a Section 14A-compliant Say-on-Pay/Say-on-Frequency proposal.

SAY-ON-GOLDEN PARACHUTE VOTE

Rule 14a-21(c) provides that if a solicitation is made by the issuer for a meetingof shareholders at which the shareholders are asked to approve an acquisition, merger,consolidation, or proposed sale or other disposition of all or substantially all of theassets of the issuer, then the issuer must provide a separate shareholder vote to approveany agreements or understandings and compensation disclosed pursuant to Item 402(t)of Regulation S-K. However, if such agreements or understandings have been subjectto a shareholder advisory vote under Rule 14a-21(a) (the Say-on-Pay vote), then aseparate shareholder vote is not required. Consistent with Exchange Act Sec-tion 14A(b), any agreements or understandings between an acquiring company and thenamed executive officers of the issuer, where the issuer is not the acquiring company,are not required to be subject to the separate shareholder advisory vote. The SEC didnot adopt any specific form of the Say-on-Golden Parachute resolution and has clari-fied the advisory nature of the Say-on-Golden Parachute vote.

The rule provides as follows:

• Item 402(t) of Regulation S-K requires disclosure of named executive offi-cers’ golden parachute arrangements in a proxy statement for shareholderapproval of a merger, sale of a company’s assets or similar transactions. ThisItem 402(t) disclosure is only required in annual meeting proxy statementswhen an issuer is seeking to rely on the exception from a separate mergerproxy shareholder vote by including the proposed Item 402(t) disclosure inthe annual meeting proxy statement soliciting a Say-on-Pay vote.

40RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (53)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

• Golden parachute compensation must be disclosed in a table along withaccompanying footnotes and narrative disclosure. This table is set forthbelow:

Golden Parachute CompensationName

(a)Cash($)(b)

Equity($)(c)

Pension/NQDC

($)(d)

Perquisites/Benefits

($)(e)

TaxReimbursem*nt

($)(f)

Other($)(g)

Total($)(h)

PEO

PFO

A

B

C

• The table requires quantification of:

O cash severance payments;

O the value of equity awards that are accelerated or cashed out;

O pension and nonqualified deferred compensation enhancements;

O perquisites and other personal benefits;

O tax reimbursem*nts; and

O in the “Other” column, any additional compensation that is not includedin any other column.

• Separate footnote identification is required for amounts attributable to“single-trigger” and “double-trigger” arrangements.

• The table requires quantification with respect to any type of compensation,whether present, deferred or contingent, that is based on or relates to anacquisition, merger, consolidation, sale or other disposition of all or sub-stantially all of the assets.

• Item 402(t) of Regulation S-K also requires issuers to describe any materialconditions or obligations applicable to the receipt of payment, including but notlimited to non-compete, non-solicitation, non-disparagement or confidentialityagreements, their duration, and provisions regarding waiver or breach.

41RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (54)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

• Disclosure of the specific circ*mstances that would trigger payment,whether the payments would be lump sum, or annual, and their duration, andby whom the payments would be provided, and other material factorsregarding each agreement is also required.

• Separate disclosure or quantification with respect to compensation disclosedin the Pension Benefits Table and Nonqualified Deferred CompensationTable (unless such benefits are enhanced in connection with the transaction),previously vested equity awards and compensation from bona fide post-transaction employment agreements entered into in connection with themerger or acquisition is not required.

In Regulation S-K Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations Question 128B.01,the Staff provides the following guidance regarding the application of Item 402(t):

Question: Instruction 1 to Item 402(t)(2) provides that Item 402(t) dis-closure will be required for those executive officers who were included inthe most recently filed Summary Compensation Table. If a company filesits annual meeting proxy statement in March 2011 (including the 2010Summary Compensation Table), hires a new principal executive officer inMay 2011 and prepares a merger proxy in September 2011, may thecompany rely on this instruction to exclude the new principal executiveofficer from the merger proxy’s say-on-golden parachute vote andItem 402(t) disclosure?

Answer: No. Instruction 1 to Item 402(t) specifies that Item 402(t)information must be provided for the individuals covered by Items402(a)(3)(i), (ii) and (iii) of Regulation S-K. Instruction 1 toItem 402(t)(2) applies only to those executive officers who are included inthe Summary Compensation Table under Item 402(a)(3)(iii), because theyare the three most highly compensated executive officers other than theprincipal executive officer and the principal financial officer. Under Items402(a)(3)(i) and (ii), the principal executive officer and the principalfinancial officer are, per se, named executive officers, regardless of com-pensation level. Consequently, Instruction 1 to Item 402(t)(2) is notinstructive as to whether the principal executive officer or principal finan-cial officer is a named executive officer. This position also applies toInstruction 2 to Item 1011(b), which is the corresponding instruction inRegulation M-A.

42RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (55)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

Additional forms, schedules and disclosure requirements address golden para-chute compensation, such as Schedule 14A, Schedule 14C, Forms S-4 and F-4,Schedule 14D-9, Schedule 13E-3 and Item 1011 of Regulation M-A. Schedule TOprovides that Item 402(t) disclosure is not required in a third-party bidders’ tenderoffer statement, so long as the subject transaction is not also Rule 13e-3 going privatetransaction. Issuers filing solicitation/recommendation statements on Schedule 14D-9in connection with third-party tender offers will be obligated to provide the disclosurerequired by Item 402(t) of Regulation S-K.

SMALLER REPORTING COMPANIES

“Smaller reporting companies,” as defined in SEC rules, were not subject to theSay-on-Pay or Say-on-Frequency requirements and the SEC’s related rules until theirfirst annual meeting or other meeting of shareholders at which directors will beelected, and for which executive compensation disclosure is required, occurring on orafter January 21, 2013.

Background Regarding Smaller Reporting Company Rules

A “smaller reporting company” is generally defined for the purposes of its initialtesting as an issuer that has a public float of less than $75 million or, in the case of anissuer that has no public float, has annual revenues of less than $50 million. A report-ing issuer with a public float determines eligibility as a smaller reporting company asof the last business day of its most recently completed second fiscal quarter, calculat-ing its float by multiplying (i) the aggregate worldwide number of shares of its (votingand non-voting) common equity held by non-affiliates by (ii) the price at which thecommon equity was last sold, or the average of the bid and asked prices, in the princi-pal market. With respect to any issuer that is above the smaller reporting companythreshold at the time of its initial testing, when that issuer subsequently tests annuallyfor smaller reporting company status, the applicable thresholds are: (i) less than $50million public float or, in the case of an issuer that has no public float; and (ii) annualconsolidated revenues of less than $40 million during its previous fiscal year. Therules contemplate an annual testing of smaller reporting company status, consistentwith the annual testing for non-accelerated filer, accelerated filer and large acceleratedfiler status.

43RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (56)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

In general, smaller reporting companies are not required to provide as muchexecutive compensation disclosure as is required for companies that do not qualify forthe smaller reporting company reporting regime. The following differences existbetween the smaller reporting company requirements and the requirements applicableto larger issuers in Items 402 and 407 of Regulation S-K:

• The number of named executive officers that is required to be disclosed isreduced, in that smaller reporting companies only have to report in theSummary Compensation Table the compensation for the principal executiveofficer and the two most highly compensated executive officers other thanthe principal executive officer who are serving at the end of the last com-pleted fiscal year and whose total compensation exceeds $100,000, as wellas two additional individuals for whom disclosure would have been pro-vided, except for the fact that they were not serving as executive officers atthe end of the fiscal year;

• The smaller reporting company requirements require information in theSummary Compensation Table for the last two completed fiscal years, ratherthan the last three completed fiscal years as required for larger issuers; inaddition, the Summary Compensation Table under the smaller reportingcompany requirements does not require the inclusion of the change in actua-rial pension plan value;

• The smaller reporting company requirement mandates additional narrativerequirements with regard to the Summary Compensation Table to explainsome of the items of compensation;

• The Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year-End Table is required underthe smaller reporting company rules, and some additional narrative dis-closure is required about items such as retirement benefits and the materialterms of contracts that would provide for benefits upon termination andchange of control;

• The CD&A, the Grants of Plan-Based Awards Table, the Option Exercisesand Stock Vested Table, the Non-Qualified Deferred Compensation Table,the Pension Benefits Table and the Compensation Committee Report are notrequired under the smaller reporting company rules;

• The disclosure required by Item 402(s) regarding the relationship of compen-sation and risk is not required for smaller reporting companies; and

44RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (57)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

• The Director Compensation Table is required under both the rules applicableto smaller reporting companies and the rules applicable to larger issuers.

No changes were made to the scaled disclosure requirements as a result of theSay-on-Pay and Say-on-Frequency votes, and thus smaller reporting companies are notrequired to include a CD&A in order to comply with Rule 14a-21. Pursuant toItem 402(o) of Regulation S-K, however, smaller reporting companies are required toprovide a narrative description of any material factors necessary to an understanding ofthe information in the Summary Compensation Table; therefore, if consideration ofprior Say-on-Pay votes is such a factor, disclosure would be required.

Transition Issues for Smaller Reporting Companies

When a non-smaller reporting company first drops below the applicable thresh-old, the issuer may immediately transition to smaller reporting company scaled dis-closure discussed above beginning with the Form 10-Q covering that second fiscalquarter-end measurement date establishing the issuer’s status as a smaller reportingcompany, although the smaller reporting company status does not begin until thebeginning of the next fiscal year. If the issuer decides to immediately transition tosmaller reporting company status, then the issuer would begin checking the smallerreporting company box on the cover page of the second quarter Form 10-Q. The rulesprovide that, when a smaller reporting company’s annual testing determines that it isno longer a smaller reporting company, the issuer must transition to the regular report-ing system, beginning with the Form 10-Q for the first fiscal quarter of the next fiscalyear after the determination date.

In Question 104.13 of the Exchange Act Forms Compliance and Disclosure Inter-pretations, the Staff presents a scenario where an issuer files its 2008 Form 10-K usingthe disclosure permitted for smaller reporting companies under Regulation S-K, andthe cover page of the Form 10-K indicates that the issuer will no longer qualify to usethe smaller reporting company disclosure for 2009, because its public float exceeded$75 million at the end of its second fiscal quarter in 2008. The issuer proposes to relyon General Instruction G(3) to incorporate by reference executive compensation andother disclosure required by Part III of Form 10-K into the 2008 Form 10-K from itsdefinitive proxy statement to be filed not later than 120 days after its 2008 fiscal yearend. The Staff indicates that, in these circ*mstances, the issuer may use smaller report-ing company disclosure in this proxy statement, even though it does not qualify to usesmaller reporting company disclosure for 2009. In the Staff’s view, this is because the

45RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (58)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

issuer could have used the smaller reporting company disclosure for Part III of its 2008Form 10-K if it had not used General Instruction G(3) to incorporate that informationby reference from the definitive proxy statement.

On February 11, 2011, the Staff of the SEC’s Division of Corporation Financeissued a number of Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations to explain how the Say-on-Pay/Say-on-Frequency exemption for smaller reporting companies will apply. Theinterpretations are as follows:

• Exchange Act Rules Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations Ques-tion 169.01:Question: Based on its $30 million public float as of the last business dayof the second quarter in 2010, an issuer with a December 31 fiscal yearend is permitted to begin filing reports as a smaller reporting companywith its Form 10-Q for the second quarter in 2010. The issuer has opted tocontinue complying with the reporting requirements for larger companiesuntil its Form 10-Q for the first quarter in 2011 and therefore will notcheck the “Smaller Reporting Company” box on the cover of any periodicreport until that Form 10-Q. Is the issuer entitled to rely on the delayedphase-in period for smaller reporting companies for compliance with Rule14a-21, even though it has not indicated its status as a smaller reportingcompany by checking the “Smaller Reporting Company” box on a peri-odic report before January 21, 2011 (the date provided in the Commissionrelease for eligibility for the smaller reporting company delayed phase-inperiod)?

Answer: Yes. An issuer that is a smaller reporting company as of Jan-uary 21, 2011 is entitled to rely on the delayed phase-in period for smallerreporting companies. Each issuer determines its eligibility for smallerreporting company status for 2011 on the basis of its public float or annualrevenue as of the last business day of the second fiscal quarter of 2010.Although an issuer is permitted to early adopt its status as a smallerreporting company, it takes that status on the first day of 2011. Accord-ingly, in this example, on January 1, 2011, the issuer is a smaller reportingcompany, even though it is not required to indicate as such until its Form10-Q for the first quarter of 2011.

46RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (59)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

• Exchange Act Rules Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations Ques-tion 169.02:Question: Based on its $100 million public float as of the last businessday of the second quarter in 2010, an issuer with a December 31 fiscalyear end will be required to report under non-smaller reporting companydisclosure provisions beginning with the Form 10-Q for the first quarter in2011. Does this issuer qualify as a smaller reporting company as of Jan-uary 21, 2011, thus entitling it to rely on the delayed phase-in period forsmaller reporting companies for compliance with Rule 14a-21?

Answer: No. Each issuer determines its eligibility for smaller reportingcompany status for 2011 on the basis of its public float or annual revenue asof the last business day of the second fiscal quarter of 2010. If an issuerwith a December 31 fiscal year end is no longer eligible to be a smallerreporting company, it loses that status on the first day of 2011, even thoughit is permitted to file its Form 10-K for 2010 in 2011 as a smaller reportingcompany. Accordingly, in this example, on January 1, 2011, the issuer is nolonger a smaller reporting company, even though it can check the “SmallerReporting Company” box on the cover of its Form 10-K for fiscal year2010. The issuer will not be permitted to check the “Smaller ReportingCompany” box on the cover of its Form 10-Q for the first quarter of 2011.

• Exchange Act Rules Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations Ques-tion 169.03:Question: Based on its $100 million public float as of September 30,2010, which is the last business day of its second fiscal quarter in 2010, anissuer with a March 31 fiscal year end that has been reporting as a smallerreporting company will be required to report under non-smaller reportingcompany disclosure provisions beginning with the Form 10-Q for its firstfiscal quarter in 2011, which begins on April 1, 2011. Does this issuerqualify as a smaller reporting company as of January 21, 2011, thus enti-tling it to rely on the delayed phase-in period for smaller reportingcompanies for compliance with Rule 14a-21?

Answer: Yes. This issuer would continue to qualify as a smaller reportingcompany until April 1, 2011 (the first day of its next fiscal year). As ofJanuary 21, 2011, this issuer would be a smaller reporting company eligi-ble for the delayed phase-in period.

47RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (60)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

INTERACTION WITH THE TARP SAY-ON-PAY REQUIREMENTS

For those issuers that have received financial assistance under the TARP and whohave indebtedness outstanding under TARP, the vote to approve executive compensa-tion under Rule 14a-20 would satisfy the Say-on-Pay vote requirement. Once theseissuers have repaid all outstanding indebtedness under TARP, they would have toinclude a Say-on-Pay vote under Exchange Act Section 14A and Rule 14a-21(a) forthe first annual meeting after the issuer has repaid all outstanding indebtedness. Theseissuers would not have to provide for a Say-on-Frequency vote as long as they stillhave indebtedness outstanding under TARP, given that the EESA already requires anannual Say-on-Pay vote for TARP recipients.

THE JUMPSTART OUR BUSINESS STARTUPS ACT

The Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act (the “JOBS Act”) was enacted onApril 5, 2012. The JOBS Act was the culmination of a year-long bipartisan effort inboth the House and Senate to address concerns about capital formation and undulyburdensome SEC regulations. The JOBS Act affects both exempt and registered offer-ings, as well as the reporting requirements for certain public issuers.

A centerpiece of the JOBS Act is an “IPO on-ramp” approach for a class of“emerging growth companies” (Title I), with confidential SEC Staff review of draftIPO registration statements, scaled disclosure requirements, no restrictions on “test-the-waters” communications with qualified institutional buyers (QIBs) and institu-tional accredited investors before and after filing a registration statement, and fewerrestrictions on research (including research by participating underwriters) around thetime of an offering.

Emerging Growth Company Status

Title I of the JOBS Act established process and disclosures for IPOs by issuersreferred to as “emerging growth companies.” Title I was retroactively effective toDecember 9, 2011 for qualifying issuers.

An “emerging growth company” (an “EGC”) is defined as an issuer (including aforeign private issuer) with total annual gross revenues of less than $1 billion (subjectto inflationary adjustment by the SEC every five years) during its most recently com-pleted fiscal year. In its Frequently Asked Questions of General Applicability on TitleI of the JOBS Act issued on April 16, 2012, the Staff of the SEC’s Division of Corpo-ration Finance specified that the phrase “total annual gross revenues” means total

48RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (61)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

revenues of the issuer (or a predecessor of the issuer, if the predecessor’s financialstatements are presented in the registration statement for the most recent fiscal year),as presented on the income statement in accordance with U.S. generally acceptedaccounting principles (“GAAP”). For financial institutions, the SEC Staff hasindicated that total annual gross revenues should be determined in the manner con-sistent with the approach used for determining status as a “smaller reportingcompany,” which looks to all gross revenues from traditional banking activities. If aforeign private issuer is using International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”) asissued by the International Accounting Standards Board (“IASB”) as its basis for pre-sentation, then the IFRS revenue number is used for this test. Because an issuer mustdetermine its EGC status based on revenues as expressed in U.S. dollars, the SEC Staffindicates that a foreign private issuer’s conversion of revenues should be based on theexchange rate as of the last day of the fiscal year. In Question 51 of the FrequentlyAsked Questions of General Applicability on Title I of the JOBS Act issued on Sep-tember 28, 2012, the Staff provides that, in applying the revenue test for determiningEGC status, a calendar year-end issuer that would like to file a registration statementfor an initial public offering of common equity securities in January 2013 (whichwould present financial statements for 2011 and 2010 and the nine months endedSeptember 30, 2012 and 2011) should look to its most recently completed fiscal year,which would be the most recent annual period completed, regardless of whether finan-cial statements for the period are presented in the registration statement. In this exam-ple, the most recent annual period completed would be 2012.

An issuer can qualify as an EGC if it first sold its common stock in a registeredoffering on or after December 9, 2011. The Staff notes in its April 16 FrequentlyAsked Questions that this eligibility determination is not limited to initial public offer-ings that took place on or prior to December 8, 2011, in that it could also include anoffering of common equity securities under an employee benefit plan on Form S-8, aswell as a selling shareholder’s registered secondary offering. The Staff does note thatjust having a registration statement go effective on or before December 8, 2011 is not abar to EGC status, as long as no common equity securities were actually sold off of theregistration statement on or before December 8, 2011.

The Staff notes in its May 3 Frequently Asked Questions that an issuer that suc-ceeds to a predecessor’s Exchange Act registration or reporting obligations under Rule12g-3 and 15d-5 will not qualify for EGC status if the predecessor’s first sale ofcommon equity securities occurred on or before December 8, 2011, as the predecessor

49RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (62)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

was not eligible for that EGC status. This FAQ left unanswered the more commoncirc*mstance where an issuer may have gone private in the past and is going publicagain, either as the same entity or through a parent or subsidiary of that entity, wherethere is no Exchange Act succession. This is particularly an issue for those companiesthat were taken private through private equity or management buyouts with theexpectation of a liquidity event or exit through an IPO in the future, which have madeup a relatively significant portion of the IPO market in recent years.

In Question 54 of the September 28 Frequently Asked Questions, the Staffaddresses the EGC status of an issuer that was once an Exchange Act reporting com-pany but is not currently required to file Exchange Act reports. The Staff notes thatsuch an issuer can take advantage of the benefits of EGC status, even though its initialpublic offering of common equity securities occurred on or before December 8, 2011.In this regard, the Staff notes that if an issuer would otherwise qualify as an EGC butfor the fact that its initial public offering of common equity securities occurred on orbefore December 8, 2011, and such issuer was once an Exchange Act reporting com-pany but is not currently required to file Exchange Act reports, then the Staff wouldnot object if such issuer takes advantage of all of the benefits of EGC status for its nextregistered offering and thereafter, until it triggers one of the disqualification provisionsin Sections 2(a)(19)(A)-(D) of the Securities Act. This position is not available to anissuer that has had the registration of a class of its securities revoked pursuant toExchange Act Section 12(j). The Staff goes on to note that, based on the particularfacts and circ*mstances, the EGC status of an issuer may be questioned if it appearsthat the issuer ceased to be a reporting company for the purpose of conducting a regis-tered offering as an EGC. The Staff recommends that issuers with questions relating tothese issues should contact the Division of Corporation Finance’s Office of the ChiefCounsel.

In Question 53 of the September 28 Frequently Asked Questions, the Staffaddresses EGC status in the context of spin-offs. The Staff addresses the situationwhere a parent decides either to spin-off a wholly owned subsidiary, register an offerand sale of the wholly-owned subsidiary’s common stock for an initial public offering,or transfer a business into a newly-formed subsidiary for purposes of undertaking aninitial public offering of that subsidiary’s common stock. In each such case, the sub-sidiary’s total annual gross revenues for its most recently completed fiscal year are lessthan $1 billion, the subsidiary would not trigger any of the disqualification provisionsin Sections 2(a)(19)(A)-(D) of the Securities Act, and the parent does not qualify as an

50RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (63)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

EGC because its first sale of common equity securities occurred on or beforeDecember 8, 2011. The Staff notes that the subsidiary would qualify as an EGC, basedon an analysis which focuses on whether the issuer, and not its parent, meets the EGCrequirements. The Staff notes that, based on the particular facts and circ*mstances, theEGC status of an issuer may be questioned if it appears that the issuer or its parent isengaging in a transaction for the purpose of converting a non-EGC into an EGC, or forthe purpose of obtaining the benefits of EGC status indirectly when it is not entitled todo so directly. The Staff recommends that issuers with questions relating to theseissues should contact the Division of Corporation Finance’s Office of the Chief Coun-sel.

Status as an EGC is maintained until the earliest of: (i) the last day of the fiscalyear in which the issuer’s total annual gross revenues are $1 billion or more; (ii) thelast day of the issuer’s fiscal year following the fifth anniversary of the date of the firstsale of common equity securities of the issuer pursuant to an effective registrationstatement under the Securities Act (for an debt-only issuer that never sold its commonequity pursuant to an Exchange Act registration statement, this five-year period willnot run); (iii) any date on which the issuer has, during the prior three-year period,issued more than $1 billion in non-convertible debt; or (iv) the date on which theissuer becomes a “Large Accelerated Filer,” as defined in the SEC’s rules. If an EGCloses its status, it cannot be regained by the issuer.

With regard to the $1 billion debt issuance test, the Staff indicated in its Fre-quently Asked Questions that the three-year period covers any rolling three-yearperiod, which is not in any way limited to completed calendar or fiscal years. The Staffalso noted that it reads “non-convertible debt” to mean any non-convertible securitythat constitutes indebtedness (whether issued in a registered offering or not), therebyexcluding bank debt or credit facilities. The debt test references debt “issued,” asopposed to “issued and outstanding,” so that any debt issued to refinance existingindebtedness over the course of the three-year period could be counted multiple times.However, the Staff indicated in its May 3 Frequently Asked Questions that they willnot object if an issuer does not double count the principal amount from a privateplacement and the principal amount from the related Exxon Capital exchange offer.

Scaled Disclosures for EGCs

Among other areas of scaled disclosure available to EGCs (including reducedfinancial statement requirements), an EGC may comply with the executive compensa-tion disclosures applicable to a “smaller reporting company” as defined in the SEC’s

51RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (64)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

rules, which means that an EGC need provide only a Summary Compensation Table(with three rather than five named executive officers and limited to two fiscal years ofinformation), an Outstanding Equity Awards Table, and a Director CompensationTable, along with some narrative disclosures to augment those tables. EGCs are notrequired to provide a Compensation Discussion and Analysis, or disclosures aboutpayments upon termination of employment or change in control.

Say-on-Pay and Other Relief for EGCs

Title I of the JOBS Act provides relief from a number of requirements for EGCsfollowing an initial public offering. An EGC will not be subject to the Say-on-Pay,Say-on-Frequency or Say-on-Golden Parachute vote required by the Dodd-Frank Act,for as long as the issuer qualifies as an EGC. An issuer that was an EGC, but lost thatstatus, will be required to comply with the Say-on-Pay vote requirement as follows:(i) in the case of an issuer that was an EGC for less than two years, by the end of thethree-year period following its IPO, and (ii) for any other issuer, within one year ofhaving lost its EGC status. An EGC also is not subject to any requirement to disclosethe relationship between executive compensation and the financial performance of thecompany (should such requirement be adopted), or the requirement to disclose theCEO’s pay relative to the median employee’s pay. In a 2015 meeting between theStaff of the Division of Corporation Finance and the American Bar Association’s JointCommittee on Employee Benefits, the Staff made clear its position that a formerEGC’s first Say-on-Frequency vote cannot be delayed to coincide with its firstrequired Say-on-Pay vote. The disconnect between the timing of the two votes resultsfrom the fact that Section 102(a)(2) of Title I of the JOBS Act (codified as Sec-tion 14A(a)(2) of the Exchange Act), which exempts EGCs from the Say-on-Pay andSay-on-Frequency voting requirements, allows an issuer that loses its EGC status atransition period before having to comply with the Say-on-Pay requirement, but doesnot extend the same transition period for the Say-on-Frequency vote.

Other than the provisions for extended transition to new or revised accountingstandards, an EGC may decide to follow only some of the scaled disclosure provisionsand corporate governance relief available for EGCs.

THE SAY-ON-PAY EXPERIENCE

The implementation of Say-on-Pay votes was one of the most widely-anticipatedcorporate governance developments in the United States over the past five years.

52RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (65)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

Advocates for Say-on-Pay in the United States hoped that the advisory votes on execu-tive compensation would serve to encourage greater accountability for executivecompensation decisions, as well as more focused compensation disclosure in proxystatements and expanded shareholder engagement.

During the 2011 proxy season, approximately forty issuers failed to achievemajority shareholder support for mandatory Say-on-Pay resolutions. During the 2012proxy season, approximately sixty issuers failed to achieve majority shareholder sup-port for mandatory Say-on-Pay resolutions. During the 2013 proxy season, approx-imately seventy-three issuers failed to achieve majority stockholder support formandatory Say-on-Pay resolutions. During the 2014 proxy season, approximatelysixty-six issuers failed to achieve majority stockholder support for mandatory Say-on-Pay resolutions. During the 2015 proxy season, approximately sixty-four issuers failedto achieve majority stockholder support for mandatory Say-on-Pay resolutions. Thehigh level of shareholder support for Say-on-Pay resolutions over the history of themandatory Say-on-Pay vote is similar to the experience in the past with respect tothose companies who held Say-on-Pay votes on a voluntary basis, or because thecompany was required to hold a Say-on-Pay vote because it had outstanding indebted-ness under TARP. In the vast majority of those situations, shareholders have providedstrong support for Say-on-Pay proposals, absent some significant concerns with thecompany’s executive compensation programs. Even with the likelihood of shareholdersupport relatively high for Say-on-Pay resolutions, companies have paid very closeattention to the message communicated through their CD&A and other disclosures,while at the same time seeking to engage with key shareholder constituencies.

DISCLOSURE FOR SAY-ON-PAY

In many ways, the disclosure that is provided in the proxy statement remains thekey point of engagement with shareholders on executive compensation issues. TheSay-on-Pay vote caused many companies to streamline and clarify their CD&A dis-closure to facilitate utilizing the CD&A to explain why shareholders should supportthe Say-on-Pay vote. In addition, issuers have sought to emphasize the overall “pay forperformance” message in the CD&A and throughout the executive compensation dis-closure in the proxy statement. To this end, many issuers began the CD&A with an“Executive Summary” or “Overview” section. The Executive Summary has proven tobe an effective way of communicating the key executive compensation information

53RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (66)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

that shareholders need to make an informed decision on the Say-on-Pay votes. Aneffective Executive Summary should include:

• A brief description of the company’s financial and business results for thelast completed fiscal year, focusing in particular on measures of performancethat are relevant to determining the compensation for the named executiveofficers, while complying with any applicable requirements with respect tothe use of non-GAAP measures (see Non-GAAP Financial Measures Com-pliance and Disclosure Interpretations Question 108.01);

• A discussion of how the issuer’s results have impacted executive compensa-tion decisions in the last fiscal year;

• A list of important compensation actions during the last completed fiscalyear, including the actions with respect to the CEO and the other namedexecutive officers; and

• A discussion of significant compensation policies and practices implementedor revised, as well as any pre-existing governance and compensation-settingprocedures, which demonstrate the issuer’s “pay for performance” philoso-phy and commitment to compensation and corporate governance best practi-ces.

Issuers have also been utilizing graphic presentations in the Executive Summaryand in the rest of the CD&A as a means of effectively highlighting the issuer’s busi-ness results and relating those results to the compensation decisions.

An overriding theme has been the relationship between pay and performance. Asa result, the Executive Summary and the remainder of the CD&A often focused onhow the compensation programs have aligned pay and performance, which neces-sitated fulsome disclosure about the performance target measures used to determinethe level of performance, as well as more detailed disclosure concerning the individualachievements of the named executive officers when such performance is an elementpursuant to which compensation is determined.

Disclosures also include more discussion of how the compensation committeeconsidered the relationship between compensation programs and risks arising for thecompany in the course of making decisions and taking actions with respect to compen-sation. This area of focus will likely continue to drive more detailed disclosure inproxy statements about the relationship between compensation and risk.

54RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (67)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

Many companies addressed the adoption or revision of some key compensationpolicies, including stock ownership and equity holding policies, compensation recov-ery policies, policies limiting perquisites and other personal benefits and policies withrespect to limiting severance and post-retirement benefits.

Recently, a number of companies have utilized alternative pay measures, such as“realized pay” and “realizable pay,” as part of their overall disclosure approach to Say-on-Pay, either as part of the pay-for-performance discussion in the CD&A or insupplemental soliciting material responding to a negative Say-on-Pay recommendationfrom ISS or Glass Lewis. These alternative measures are used to compare pay to thecompany’s performance, and to compare an executive officer’s reported and/or targetpay to the realized or realizable pay. While there is no uniform approach to thesemeasures, formulations of “realized pay” typically include: (i) actual earned cashcompensation (including salary and bonuses); (ii) actual payouts under performanceshare or performance cash awards; and (iii) the value of exercised or taxable equityawards, essentially including any equity awards that vested, were exercised or wereotherwise earned during the relevant measurement period, and excluding those awardsthat remain outstanding and have not yet vested or have not been exercised, while“realizable pay” usually differs from “realized pay” by including the intrinsic value ofall (or a portion of) equity awards that are outstanding at the end of the relevant period,regardless of whether the awards have been exercised (with respect to options orSARs) or paid or vested (with respect to restricted stock, RSUs and other full-valueequity awards). For this purpose, the equity awards are valued using the company’sstock price at the end of the fiscal year-end. Realizable pay is often compared directlyto the total compensation reported in the Summary Company Table, and changes inrealizable pay are compared to changes in total shareholder return and other issuerperformance metrics over a specified long-term performance period, such as threeyears.

SAY-ON-PAY ENGAGEMENT

Active engagement with shareholders on executive compensation and corporategovernance issues is one of the expected results of a Say-on-Pay vote. Companies haveexplored a variety of approaches to accomplish effective engagement with share-holders.

55RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (68)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

Direct Interaction with Shareholders

Some issuers elected to conduct a “road show” focused on (or including as acomponent) executive compensation and corporate governance matters. These roadshows typically took place in advance of the filing of the proxy statement (e.g., 30-60days before the proxy statement filing) and were conducted in person or via tele-conference, typically involving both portfolio managers and voting analysts at institu-tional investors and senior level management, and in some cases, a director from thecompany. The road shows are largely designed to be informational, rather than servingto actively solicit any vote on expected proposals for the annual meeting, which couldpresent solicitation issues under the SEC’s proxy rules. Participants in these engage-ment activities usually address publicly-disclosed corporate governance and executivecompensation initiatives demonstrating the company’s responsiveness to shareholders,pay-for-performance considerations and the issuer’s continuing attention to share-holder concerns (if any) on corporate governance and executive compensation issues.Participants typically avoid discussing material non-public information about the issu-er’s performance or plans for corporate governance and executive compensation pro-gram changes.

In the 2011 proxy season, a group of large institutional investors requested thatsome large companies hold a “fifth analyst call” to focus on executive compensationand corporate governance issues. The fifth analyst call would take place after a com-pany mailed its proxy statement, but before the annual meeting. The institutionalinvestor proposal for a fifth analyst call sought board member involvement in the call,such as the chairman of the board or the lead independent director. This fifth analystcall has not become a common practice.

The Use of Additional Soliciting Material

In a number of situations during the past three proxy seasons, Say-on-Pay votingled to the filing of additional soliciting material (filed as under the submission type“DEFA14A” on the SEC’s EDGAR filing system) by issuers during the period of timebetween the mailing of the proxy statement and the annual meeting. In many of thesesituations, the additional soliciting material responded to an adverse Say-on-Payrecommendation made by a proxy adviser, either ISS or Glass, Lewis & Co. Issuersused the additional soliciting material to identify errors or flaws in the analysis under-lying the proxy adviser’s recommendation, while at the same time providing argu-ments as to why the Say-on-Pay proposal should be supported. The use of the

56RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (69)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

additional soliciting material, along with active engagement efforts, most often led to asuccessful Say-on-Pay vote.

SAY-ON-FREQUENCY RECOMMENDATIONS AND VOTING

Most proxy statements filed in the 2011 proxy season with mandatory Say-on-Frequency votes included a recommendation as to the preferred frequency of futureSay-on-Pay votes, with the majority of those recommendations favoring Say-on-Payvotes every year. In approximately half of those cases where issuers recommended aonce every three years frequency, shareholders supported an annual Say-on-Pay vote,notwithstanding the once every three years recommendation. In the relatively few sit-uations where the board recommended a Say-on-Pay vote once every two years, anannual frequency for Say-on-Pay voting was favored in approximately 65 percent ofthose cases. In the few circ*mstances where no recommendation from the board wasprovided, shareholders mostly supported an annual Say-on-Pay vote.

Proxy advisory firms ISS and Glass Lewis will only recommend voting for anannual Say-on-Pay vote frequency. Some institutional investors that do not follow ISSor Glass Lewis recommendations also adopted policies supporting annual Say-on-Payvotes. However, a few institutional investors adopted policies providing support forSay-on-Pay votes that occur once every three years. Given these circ*mstances,obtaining the plurality or majority support of shareholders for an “every three years” oran “every two years” Say-on-Pay voting interval became increasingly difficult as the2011 proxy season unfolded.

Smaller reporting companies conducted Say-on-Frequency votes for the first timein 2013.

CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE FREQUENCY OF THE SAY-ON-PAY VOTE

The following summarizes some of the key considerations for determining whatSay-on-Pay voting frequency to recommend to shareholders.

A Vote of Once Every Year – Positive Considerations:

• A vote that occurs every year could make the Say-on-Pay vote less of a sig-nificant event from a shareholder’s perspective, which could make it moreroutine, similar to the ratification of auditors.

• With a Say-on-Pay vote occurring once every year, shareholders are able toexpress their views on an annual basis, which may mean that they will be

57RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (70)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

less concerned with the issuer’s compensation policies, practices and deci-sions than if they were only able to vote once every two or three years.

• In 2010, ISS implemented a policy (commonly referred to as the “yellowcard/red card approach”) which provides that, for those issuers submitting aSay-on-Pay vote to shareholders, ISS will first recommend against the Say-on-Pay resolution if there is an issue with executive compensation, and thenif the issue is not addressed by the next meeting, ISS will then recommendagainst the election of compensation committee members.

• ISS and Glass Lewis will only recommend for an annual Say-on-Pay votefrequency.

• Proxy advisers such as ISS, certain investors, and commentators view anannual vote on executive compensation as a good corporate governancepractice and may therefore be less likely to target issuers that provide for anannual Say-on-Pay vote.

A Vote of Once Every Year – Negative Considerations:

• Certain institutional investors have sought a Say-on-Pay vote once every twoor three years, in recognition of the fact that it is difficult for investors todeal with the volume of work necessary to make an informed decision on aSay-on-Pay vote.

• Engagement with institutional investors on compensation issues can be diffi-cult to do on an annual basis, given that so many issuers seek to engage withinstitutional investors in advance of a Say-on-Pay vote.

• In the event that an issuer gets a negative vote, it typically must very quicklyadjust its compensation policies and practices in order to have the changestake effect and be considered in advance of the next Say-on-Pay vote.

A Vote of Once Every Two or Three Years – Positive Considerations:

• A Say-on-Pay vote occurring once every two or three years allows proxyadvisers and institutional investors more time to review and analyze theexecutive compensation program and practices between votes, so that thoseparties can better formulate their views on an issuer’s executive compensa-tion.

• The frequency of once every two or three years could potentially provide theissuer with more time to address compensation concerns through the

58RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (71)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

engagement process with shareholders and through changes to compensationpolicies and practices.

• A Say-on-Pay vote occurring once every two or three years allows institu-tional investors to better evaluate the effectiveness of long-term incentivecomponents of compensation, given that the interval between votes moreclosely aligns with performance cycles and allows a more meaningful com-parison between compensation and performance.

• A Say-on-Pay vote occurring once every two or three years allows an issuerthe option to bring a Say-on-Pay vote on a more frequent basis if it wants todo so, because the vote on the frequency of voting is non-binding.

A Vote of Once Every Two or Three Years – Negative Considerations:

• A vote of once every two or three years may be portrayed negatively in thepress, because it does not provide investors with an annual voice withrespect to compensation issues and thereby may be seen as implying that anissuer is attempting to hide something from shareholders.

• A Say-on-Pay vote occurring once every two or three years is less likely toreceive institutional investor support.

• ISS and Glass Lewis will only recommend for an annual Say-on-Pay votefrequency.

• A Say-on-Pay vote occurring once every two or three years could exposemembers of the compensation committee to recommendations against themin a year when no Say-on-Pay vote is on the ballot.

• A vote occurring every two or three years may be viewed by some proxyadvisers, investors and commentators as a poor corporate governance prac-tice because it does not provide investors with an annual voice on compensa-tion issues.

• Voting on Say-on-Pay once every two or three years potentially makes theresolution appear to have more significance, because the resolution is notpresented on a more frequent basis to shareholders, and there is more timefor shareholders and proxy advisers to organize opposition to the issuer’sSay-on-Pay vote.

59RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (72)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

SAY-ON-GOLDEN PARACHUTE COMPENSATION DISCLOSURE AND VOTING

A company seeking to avoid an advisory vote on golden parachute compensationin connection with a future vote on a merger or similar extraordinary transaction mayvoluntarily include the Item 402(t) tabular and narrative disclosures in the proxystatement for an annual meeting at which a Say-on-Pay vote will be held under theDodd-Frank Act and the SEC’s rules. However, if there are changes to the arrange-ments after the date of the vote or if new arrangements are entered into that were notsubject to a prior Say-on-Pay vote, then a separate shareholder advisory vote on thegolden parachute compensation is still required. In that case, the Say-on-Golden Para-chute vote is required only with respect to the amended golden parachute paymentarrangements. Other than changes that result only in a reduction in the amount ofgolden parachute compensation or that arise because of a change in the stock price,any other change to the golden parachute arrangements after the Say-on-Pay vote willtrigger the requirement for a new vote.

A relatively small number of issuers have included the golden parachute compen-sation disclosure in annual meeting proxy statements where no vote was taking placewith respect to a merger or similar transaction. It appears likely that issuers will avoidsuch “advance” votes on golden parachute compensation, given concerns about howthe required disclosures concerning golden parachute compensation arrangementscould impact the Say-on-Pay vote. In addition, issuers may be concerned that provid-ing such disclosures may voluntarily signal to the market that the issuer could beengaged in a significant transaction in the near future.

Issuers have generally adhered closely to the requirements of the Golden ParachuteCompensation Table in merger proxies, registration statements and other transactionalforms filed since the rules became effective. In some cases, the new disclosure results inan additional page of disclosure in the applicable form or schedule, while in other casesthe table and footnotes extend over several pages because of the complexity of variousscenarios and triggering events. In addition, many issuers that have filed merger proxiesor registration statements that require a shareholder advisory vote on golden parachuteshave described the relationship of the golden parachute advisory vote to other votes onthe transaction, including approval of the merger or other transaction itself. While issuersare required to disclose that the golden parachute vote is nonbinding, many have gonefurther to disclose whether or not the golden parachute vote is a condition of the trans-action and whether the results of the advisory vote on golden parachutes would affect theconsummation of the merger. Approval of the golden parachute arrangements is typi-

60RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (73)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

cally not a condition of the transaction, and a lack of approval of the golden parachuteswill not affect consummation of the transaction.

Many issuers have included disclosure regarding the effect of the golden para-chute advisory vote on the status of the golden parachute payments. This type of dis-closure typically notes that the golden parachute arrangements are contractualobligations of the issuer, and that even though the issuer values the input of share-holders as to whether such arrangements are appropriate, the issuer would nonethelessbe required contractually to make, and would make, such payments even if thearrangements are not approved by the shareholders in the advisory vote.

SAY-ON-PAY LAWSUITS

The Say-on-Pay vote is nonbinding, and the Dodd-Frank Act expressly providesthat such advisory vote may not be construed as (1) overruling a decision by an issueror its board of directors; (2) creating or implying any change to the fiduciary duties ofa company or its board of directors; (3) creating or implying any additional fiduciaryduties for an issuer or its board of directors; or (4) restricting or limiting the ability ofshareholders to make proposals for inclusion in proxy materials related to executivecompensation. Nonetheless, a few years ago plaintiffs filed derivative actions in statecourts against directors of companies (and in some cases their executive officers andcompensation consultants) based on the outcome of a Say-on-Pay vote. These lawsuitstypically alleged that directors breached their fiduciary duties of care and loyalty inone or more of the following ways: (i) directors diverted corporate assets to executiveofficers, putting the interests of the executive officers ahead of the interests of stock-holders; (ii) issuers that disclosed “pay-for-performance” compensation policies didnot adequately disclose or misrepresented that compensation was nonetheless paid toexecutive officers in contravention of such policies (i.e., compensation was paid evenif performance goals were not met or financial performance was otherwise poor); and(iii) directors are subject to corporate waste claims based on the overall size of execu-tive compensation awards. Further, the lawsuits alleged that executive officers wereunjustly enriched by pay increases, and that in some cases compensation consultantsaided and abetted the directors in their breaches of fiduciary duty and/or breached theconsulting agreement with the issuer. In the lawsuits, plaintiffs have alleged that thefailed Say-on-Pay vote is probative evidence that the compensation programs are notin the best interests of stockholders and that directors should not be entitled to theprotections of the “business judgment rule.” In these cases, the plaintiffs sought,among other things, unspecified damages resulting from the executive compensation

61RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (74)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

plans, costs and attorneys’ fees, as well as the implementation of internal controls toprevent excessive compensation in the future.

PROXY STATEMENT LITIGATION

Issuers have historically been able to solicit proxies for their annual meetingswithout the threat of the type of shareholder litigation that usually accompanies thesolicitation of votes for special meeting to approve a merger or acquisition. In pastproxy seasons, plantiffs have filed lawsuits seeking to enjoin annual meetings based onalleged deficiencies in the proxy statement disclosures for proposals to approveincreases in equity plan reserves or authorized shares, as well as advisory votes onexecutive compensation.

These types of lawsuits often alleged breaches of fiduciary duties by managementand directors of issuers, as well as aiding and abetting by the issuer itself, based on pur-ported disclosure deficiencies in the proxy statements seeking shareholder votes on anincrease in the amount of shares reserved for an equity compensation plan, an increase inthe authorized shares and/or advisory votes on executive compensation. These claims arenot based on a failure to include disclosure required in the proxy statement by the SEC’srules, but are rather based on state law fiduciary duty concepts. Typically, the lawsuitsalleged that, with respect to proposals to increase the size of an equity plan or to increasethe number of authorized shares, the company has failed to adequately describe the rea-son for an increase in the amount of shares, as well as the projections considered and thepotential dilution that may result. With regard to advisory votes on executive compensa-tion, the plaintiffs alleged a failure to adequately describe the role and advice ofcompensation consultants, to provide additional disclosure regarding peer groupcompensation practices, and disclose the rationale for the mix of short-term and long-term compensation. The plaintiffs sought a tactical advantage by filing these lawsuitsafter the issuer mailed the definitive proxy statement and before the annual meeting, thusproviding typically only about one month for a court to decide on the motion to enjointhe annual meeting. An issuer often first learn of these lawsuits when the plaintiffs’ lawfirm issues a press release to announce a “pending investigation.”

These lawsuits have typically been shareholder class actions that are filed in statecourts where the subject issuer has sufficient contacts. These lawsuits were usually notfiled in federal court or in Delaware (where many of the subject companies areincorporated), presumably because there is a higher likelihood that the disclosure-based claims would be dismissed in federal court or in the Delaware Chancery Court.The lawsuits usually did not allege that the subject issuers have failed to meet dis-

62RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (75)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

closure requirements established by the SEC with regard to the proposals included inthe proxy statement; rather, the lawsuits alleged that the defendants (which typicallyinclude the members of the board of directors, senior management and the company)breached their fiduciary duties to shareholders by failing to adequately discloseinformation when seeking a vote on the proposals.

The complaints often alleged that the individual defendants, i.e., the members ofthe board of directors and senior management, have breached fiduciary duties of care,loyalty, candor and good faith owed to public shareholders, and have acted to put theirown personal interests ahead of the interests of shareholders. These individual defend-ants were alleged to have failed to disclose all material information necessary to makean informed decision regarding the advisory vote on executive compensation or anincrease in shares proposal. As a result of these actions, it was alleged that theindividual defendants have failed to exercise ordinary care and diligence in theexercise of their fiduciary duties. The issuer was alleged to have knowingly aided andabetted the disclosure deficiencies and therefore the breaches of fiduciary duty.

In the complaints, plaintiffs sought: (i) a declaration that the proxy statement wasissued in breach of the fiduciary duties of the individual defendants and is thereforeunlawful, and that the company aided and abetted the issuance of the materially mis-leading and incomplete proxy statement; (ii) an injunction from consummating thevote on the subject proposals until the company provides adequate disclosure regard-ing the proposals; (iii) an award of damages, attorneys’ and experts fees and othercosts, and (iv) any other further relief that the court deems appropriate.

The claims of inadequate disclosure in these lawsuits focused on information thatthe plaintiffs’ deemed to be important details relevant to the advisory vote on execu-tive compensation, the vote to increase the share reserve for the equity compensationplan or the vote to increase the number of authorized shares. These claims were notbased on a failure to meet SEC-established requirements or applicable case law-established standards for disclosure.

The allegations in the lawsuits focused on a number of areas where the disclosurethat is related to the advisory vote on executive compensation was alleged to be defi-cient, including:

• The disclosure does not include a fair summary of the advice, counsel andanalysis performed and provided to the board of directors and/or manage-ment by a compensation consultant;

63RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (76)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

• The disclosure does not address how the board of directors or the compensa-tion committee selected outside advisors and how much was paid to the out-side advisors in connection with their engagement;

• The discussion of the peer group utilized in analyzing executive compensa-tion does not include detailed disclosure of the data with respect to salary,short-term and long-term incentives and total direct compensation for eachof the companies in the peer group;

• The disclosure does not adequately address the rationale for the mix of long-term and short-term compensation;

• The role of management in the compensation-setting process is notadequately addressed; and

• Changes in various things in the current year are not adequately addressed interms of the rationale for the change, such as changes to the peer group or anincrease in compensation.

It is possible that plaintiffs would raise any number of additional disclosure deficien-cies in future lawsuits, based on the success of other claims and the individual circum-stances of the proxy statements that are the subject of the claims.

Further, the allegations in the lawsuits focused on a number of areas where thedisclosure related to an increase in the shares reserved for an equity compensation planor an increase the amount of common stock authorized was alleged to be deficient,including:

• A failure to disclose the number of shares currently expected to be paid outin the year under the company’s equity compensation plan, or any otherprojections considered by the board of directors;

• The disclosure does not describe the criteria considered by the board of direc-tors to implement the proposal, and why the proposal would be in the bestinterests of the shareholders;

• The disclosure does not describe why the current share reserve is inadequate;

• The disclosure does not describe how the board of directors determined thenumber of additional shares requested to be authorized;

64RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (77)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

• The disclosure does not identify the potential equity value and/or the cost ofissuance of the additional authorized shares;

• A failure to disclose the dilutive impact of issuing additional shares underthe equity plan on existing shareholders, and any share repurchases thatmight be planned;

• The disclosure does not identify the expected use for the shares and howlong the company expects the increased share reserve to last;

• The proxy statement does not include a fair summary of any expert’s analy-sis or opinion obtained in connection with the proposal; and

• A lack of specificity in describing the performance goals.

It is possible that plaintiffs will raise any number of additional disclosure deficienciesin future lawsuits, based on the success of other claims and the individual circum-stances of the proxy statements that are the subject of the claims.

It is difficult to determine the likelihood of the commencement of this type of liti-gation when an issuer files its proxy statement, however it appears that the frequencyof these types of lawsuits has recently declined.

One approach to anticipating these types of lawsuits would be to includeenhanced disclosure in the proxy statement as filed which fully addresses theinformation identified above. The addition of this disclosure would not in any wayensure that a lawsuit would not be filed, however, because the plaintiffs could identifyany number of areas in which to allege that the disclosure is deficient, even if the dis-closure is indeed not deficient under the standards of the SEC requirements and gen-eral principles of materiality.

Some issuers, upon learning of the pending investigation by a plaintiffs’ law firm,have appeared to file supplemental proxy soliciting materials which provide theinformation sought in the similar lawsuits. It is possible that this disclosure wouldthereby prevent the plaintiffs from filing a complaint, because their claims have beenrendered moot by the supplemental disclosure.

A third option would be to anticipate the possibility of the lawsuit and to be pre-pared to enter into settlement discussions quickly, which would likely result in therelease of additional proxy soliciting material, the payment of costs and the potentialfor a delay in the vote on the subject proposal or proposals.

65RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (78)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

The fourth option would be to defend the lawsuit, seeking to have the court dis-miss the claims prior to the issuer’s annual meeting. Depending on the court system inwhich the issuer would be sued, this strategy could potentially lead to a delay in theannual meeting or at least a delay in the vote on the proposals as the litigation pro-ceeds, and there is no certainty as to whether the outcome of the litigation would ulti-mately be favorable to the issuer.

ANNOTATED MODEL SAY-ON-PAY AND SAY-ON-FREQUENCY PROPOSALS

Annotated Model Say-on-Pay Proposal

PROPOSAL [ ] – ADVISORY VOTE ON EXECUTIVECOMPENSATION

The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act added Sec-tion 14A to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, which requires that we provide ourshareholders with the opportunity to vote to approve, on a nonbinding, advisory basis,the compensation of our named executives officers as disclosed in this proxy statementin accordance with the compensation disclosure rules of the Securities and ExchangeCommission.

As described in greater detail under the heading “Compensation Discussion andAnalysis,” we seek to closely align the interests of our named executive officers withthe interests of our shareholders. [Our compensation programs are designed to rewardour named executive officers for the achievement of short-term and long-term strategicand operational goals and the achievement of increased total shareholder return, whileat the same time avoiding the encouragement of unnecessary or excessive risk-taking.][This statement should be adapted as appropriate for the issuer. In this regard, a briefstatement of the issuer’s philosophy with respect to executive compensation is useful inthis context. Moreover, smaller reporting companies may not have a “CompensationDiscussion and Analysis” section to refer to, so they may want to reference whereother relevant disclosures are provided.]

[The proposal may include a brief discussion of important compensation actionsand decisions in the last completed fiscal year. In this regard, the disclosure in theproposal can provide a high-level overview of the reasons why shareholders shouldvote for the issuer’s executive compensation. The summary included in the proposalitself can work in conjunction with the “Executive Summary” or “Overview.” In someinstances, issuers choose to only cross-reference the CD&A disclosure without includ-ing a statement in support of the Say-on-Pay resolution in the proposal.]

66RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (79)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

This vote is advisory, which means that the vote on executive compensation is notbinding on the Company, our Board of Directors or the Compensation Committee ofthe Board of Directors. The vote on this resolution is not intended to address any spe-cific element of compensation, but rather relates to the overall compensation of ournamed executive officers, as described in this proxy statement in accordance with thecompensation disclosure rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission. [To theextent there is a significant vote against our named executive officer compensation asdisclosed in this proxy statement, the Compensation Committee will evaluate whetherany actions are necessary to address our shareholders’ concerns.] [The SEC’s rules donot require that an issuer address what actions it will undertake in response to theSay-on-Pay vote (by contrast to the disclosure required with respect to ratification ofauditors), rather requiring a discussion in subsequent CD&A disclosure of whetherand, if so, how the issuer has considered the results of the most recent shareholderadvisory vote on executive compensation in determining compensation policies anddecisions and, if so, how that consideration has affected the issuer’s compensationdecisions and policies. It may, nevertheless, be useful at the time of presenting theproposal to explain how the vote will be considered as a means of clarifying the advi-sory nature of the vote.]

[The affirmative vote of a majority of the shares present or represented and enti-tled to vote either in person or by proxy is required to approve this Proposal [ ]].[Issuers will have to evaluate what is the most appropriate voting standard for a Say-on-Pay proposal. Issuers should also consider describing, in this section or in thefront portion of the proxy statement, the effect of abstentions and broker non-votes onthe vote.]

Accordingly, we ask our shareholders to vote on the following resolution at theAnnual Meeting:

[The following is the form of resolution that the SEC includes in the Instruction toExchange Act Rule 14a-21(a). Smaller reporting companies will need to revise theform of resolution if they elect to not provide CD&A disclosure under the scaled dis-closure requirements.]

“RESOLVED, that the compensation paid to the company’s named executiveofficers, as disclosed pursuant to Item 402 of Regulation S-K, including theCompensation Discussion and Analysis, compensation tables and narrativediscussion, is hereby APPROVED.”

67RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (80)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

[The following is an alternative form of the resolution. In Exchange Act Rules Com-pliance and Disclosure Interpretations Question 169.05, the SEC Staff has indicatedthat it is permissible for the Say-on-Pay vote to omit the words, “pursuant to Item 402of Regulation S-K,” and to replace those words with a plain English equivalent, suchas, “pursuant to the compensation disclosure rules of the Securities and ExchangeCommission, including the compensation discussion and analysis, the compensationtables and any related material disclosed in this proxy statement.” This alternativeformulation also makes clear in the language of the resolution itself that the vote isadvisory. Smaller reporting companies will need to revise the form of resolution if theyelect to not provide CD&A disclosure under the scaled disclosure requirements.]

“RESOLVED, that the Company’s shareholders approve, on an advisory basis,the compensation of the named executive officers, as disclosed in the Compa-ny’s Proxy Statement for the 2011 Annual Meeting of Shareholders pursuant tothe compensation disclosure rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission,including the Compensation Discussion and Analysis, the SummaryCompensation Table and the other related tables and disclosure.”

We have determined that our shareholders should cast an advisory vote on the compen-sation of our named executive officers on an [annual] basis. Unless this policychanges, the next advisory vote on the compensation of our named executive officerswill be at the [ ] annual meeting of shareholders.

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS UNANIMOUSLY RECOMMENDS A VOTEFOR THE APPROVAL OF THE COMPENSATION OF OUR NAMEDEXECUTIVE OFFICERS, AS DISCLOSED IN THIS PROXY STATEMENT.

Annotated Model Say-on-Frequency Proposal

PROPOSAL [ ] – ADVISORY VOTE ON THE FREQUENCY OFAN ADVISORY VOTE ON EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act added Sec-tion 14A to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, which requires that we provideshareholders with the opportunity to vote, on a non-binding, advisory basis, for theirpreference as to how frequently to vote on future advisory votes on the compensationof our named executive officers as disclosed in accordance with the compensationdisclosure rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission.

68RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (81)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

Shareholders may indicate whether they would prefer that we conduct futureadvisory votes on executive compensation once every one, two, or three years. Share-holders also may abstain from casting a vote on this proposal.

[The following language should be adjusted to reflect the board of directors’determination as to the recommended frequency of every year, every two years orevery three years. Neither Rule 14a-21(b) nor the SEC’s other proxy rules require thatan issuer make a recommendation with respect to the Say-on-Frequency vote; how-ever, the SEC notes that proxy holders may vote uninstructed proxy cards in accord-ance with management’s recommendation only if the issuer follows the existingrequirements of Rule 14a-4, which include specifying how proxies will be voted (i.e.,in accordance with management’s recommendations) in the absence of instructionfrom the shareholder. Most proxy statements filed in the 2011 proxy season withmandatory Say-on-Frequency votes have included a recommendation as to the pre-ferred frequency of future Say-on-Pay votes, with the majority of those recom-mendations favoring Say-on-Pay votes once every three years.]

[The Board of Directors has determined that an advisory vote on executive com-pensation that occurs once [every three years][every two years] is the most appropriatealternative for the Company and therefore the Board recommends that you vote for a[three-year interval][two-year interval] for the advisory vote on executive compensa-tion. In determining to recommend that shareholders vote for a frequency of once[every three years][every two years], the Board considered how an advisory vote atthis frequency will provide our shareholders with sufficient time to evaluate the effec-tiveness of our overall compensation philosophy, policies and practices in the contextof our long-term business results for the corresponding period, while avoiding over-emphasis on short-term variations in compensation and business results. An advisoryvote occurring once [every three years][every two years] will also permit our share-holders to observe and evaluate the impact of any changes to our executive compensa-tion policies and practices which have occurred since the last advisory vote onexecutive compensation, including changes made in response to the outcome of a prioradvisory vote on executive compensation.]

[The Board of Directors has determined that an annual advisory vote on executivecompensation will permit our shareholders to provide direct input on the Company’sexecutive compensation philosophy, policies and practices as disclosed in the proxystatement each year, which is consistent with our efforts to engage in an ongoing dia-

69RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (82)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

logue with our shareholders on executive compensation and corporate governancematters.]

This vote is advisory, which means that the vote on executive compensation is notbinding on the Company, our Board of Directors or the Compensation Committee ofthe Board of Directors. The Company recognizes that the shareholders may havedifferent views as to the best approach for the Company, and therefore we look for-ward to hearing from our shareholders as to their preferences on the frequency of anadvisory vote on executive compensation. [This statement is not required by the SEC’srules; however, it may be advisable to include this statement in order to clarify that theboard of directors is open to considering the preferences expressed by shareholdersthrough the vote, without necessarily committing to adopt the frequency most favoredby the shareholders.] [The Board of Directors and the Compensation Committee willtake into account the outcome of the vote; however, when considering the frequency offuture advisory votes on executive compensation, the Board of Directors may decidethat it is in the best interests of our shareholders and the Company to hold an advisoryvote on executive compensation more or less frequently than the frequency receivingthe most votes cast by our shareholders.] [The SEC’s rules do not require an issuer toaddress in the proxy statement what actions it will undertake in response to the Say-on-Frequency vote, however, it may be useful to include this information as a meansfor describing the advisory nature of the vote. Moreover, issuers will have to evaluatewhat is the most appropriate voting standard for interpreting the Say-on-Frequencyvote. In this regard, it should be noted that the SEC has added a new Note toExchange Act Rule 14a-8(i)(10) to permit the exclusion of a shareholder proposal as“substantially implemented” if the proposal would provide for a Say-on-Pay vote, seekfuture Say-on-Pay votes, or relate to the frequency of Say-on-Pay votes. Such share-holder proposals may be excluded under the new Note if, in the most recent Say-on-Frequency vote, a single frequency received a majority of the votes cast and the issueradopted a policy for the frequency of Say-on-Pay votes that is consistent with thatchoice. This does not mean that an issuer could not utilize a different voting standardfor determining the preference of the shareholders, such as plurality (i.e., the fre-quency receiving the most votes cast by the shareholders).]

[The following is an example of a resolution for the Say-on-Frequency vote. The Staffindicates in Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations Question 169.06 that it ispermissible for the Say-on-Frequency vote to include the words “every year, everyother year, or every three years, or abstain” in lieu of “every 1, 2, or 3 years, orabstain.”]

70RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (83)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

Shareholders may cast a vote on the preferred voting frequency by selecting theoption of one year, two years, or three years (or abstain) when voting in response tothe resolution set forth below.

“RESOLVED, that the shareholders determine, on an advisory basis, whether thepreferred frequency of an advisory vote on the executive compensation of the Compa-ny’s named executive officers as set forth in the Company’s proxy statement should beevery year, every two years, or every three years.”

[The following is an example of proposal language that does not include a resolutionfor the Say-on-Frequency vote. Exchange Act Rules Compliance and Disclosure Inter-pretations Question 169.04 indicates that the Say-on-Frequency vote need not be setforth as a resolution. Separately, the Staff has informally cautioned that the Say-on-Frequency vote must be clearly stated, and that in this regard it must be clear thatshareholders can vote on the options of every one, two or three years (or abstain fromvoting), rather than solely following management’s recommendation (if any isprovided). It is likely that issuers will rely on this guidance to provide more Say-on-Frequency votes in a “proposal” format, such as by simply referencing the fourchoices that are available on the proxy card.]

The proxy card provides shareholders with the opportunity to choose among fouroptions (holding the vote every one, two or three years, or abstain from voting) and,therefore, shareholders will not be voting to approve or disapprove the recom-mendation of the Board of Directors.

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS RECOMMENDS THAT YOU VOTE FOR THEOPTION OF [ONCE EVERY THREE YEARS][ONCE EVERY TWOYEARS][ONCE EVERY YEAR] AS THE PREFERRED FREQUENCY FORADVISORY VOTES ON EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION.

MODEL SAY-ON-PAY AND SAY-ON-FREQUENCY BOARD RESOLUTIONS

Resolutions for the Annual Meeting

The following model resolutions can be utilized in preparing resolutions for theannual meeting:

Advisory Vote on Executive Compensation

WHEREAS, the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended by the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”),

71RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (84)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

requires that the Corporation submit a resolution for its stockholders to approve, on anadvisory basis, the compensation of the Corporation’s “named executive officers” (assuch term is defined in the applicable SEC rules), as disclosed in the Corporation’sproxy statement under the SEC’s rules, at least once every three years;

WHEREAS, in accordance with the Dodd-Frank Act, the vote to approve thecompensation of the Corporation’s named executive officers as disclosed in the proxystatement under the SEC’s rules shall not be construed: (i) as overruling any decision bythe Corporation or the Board; (ii) to create or imply any change in the fiduciary duties ofthe Corporation or the Board; (iii) to create or imply any additional fiduciary duties forthe Corporation or the Board; and (iv) to restrict or limit the ability of the Corporation’sstockholders to make proposals for inclusion in the Corporation’s proxy statement relat-ing to executive compensation except as may be provided under applicable SEC rules;

WHEREAS, the Board has determined that it is in the best interests of the stock-holders of the Corporation to submit a resolution for its stockholders to approve, on anadvisory basis, the compensation of the Corporation’s named executive officers asdisclosed in the proxy statement under the SEC’s rules at least once every three years;and

WHEREAS, the Board has determined that it is in the best interests of the stock-holders of the Corporation for the Board to recommend that the stockholders of theCorporation vote, on an advisory basis, “For” the compensation of the Corporation’snamed executive officers as disclosed in the proxy statement under the SEC’s rules atleast once every three years;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Corporation’s stockholdersshall vote on a resolution to approve, on an advisory basis, the compensation of theCorporation’s named executive officers as disclosed in accordance with the SEC’srules in the proxy statement for the Annual Meeting of Stockholders; and

RESOLVED FURTHER, that the Board unanimously recommends that theCorporation’s stockholders approve, on an advisory basis, the compensation of theCorporation’s named executive officers as disclosed in accordance with the SEC’srules in the proxy statement for the Annual Meeting of Stockholders.

Frequency of the Advisory Vote on Executive Compensation

WHEREAS, the Dodd-Frank Act requires that the Corporation submit a reso-lution at least once every six years for its stockholders to determine, on an advisory

72RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (85)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

basis, the frequency with which the Corporation’s stockholders approve, on an advi-sory basis, the compensation of the Corporation’s named executive officers as dis-closed in the Corporation’s proxy statement under the SEC’s rules;

WHEREAS, in accordance with the Dodd-Frank Act, the vote on the frequencyof the advisory vote on the compensation of the Corporation’s named executive offi-cers as disclosed in the proxy statement under the SEC’s rules shall not be construed:(i) as overruling any decision by the Corporation or the Board; (ii) to create or implyany change in the fiduciary duties of the Corporation or the Board; (iii) to create orimply any additional fiduciary duties for the Corporation or the Board; and (iv) torestrict or limit the ability of the Corporation’s stockholders to make proposals forinclusion in the Corporation’s proxy statement relating to executive compensationexcept as may be provided under applicable SEC rules; and

[WHEREAS, the Board believes that an annual advisory vote on executive com-pensation will allow the Corporation’s stockholders to provide the Corporation withtheir direct input on the Corporation’s compensation philosophy, policies and practicesas disclosed in the Corporation’s proxy statement every year and that an annual advi-sory vote on executive compensation is consistent with the Corporation’s generalpolicy of seeking input from, and engaging in discussions with, the Corporation’sstockholders on corporate governance matters and the Corporation’s executivecompensation philosophy, policies and practices;]

[WHEREAS, the Board believes that an advisory vote on executive compensationthat occurs once [every three years][every two years] will provide stockholders withsufficient time to evaluate the effectiveness of the Corporation’s overall compensationphilosophy, policies and practices in the context of long-term business results for thecorresponding period, while avoiding over-emphasis on short-term variations in com-pensation and business results; and that an advisory vote occurring once [every threeyears][every two years] will also permit the Corporation’s stockholders to observe andevaluate the impact of any changes to the Corporation’s executive compensation poli-cies and practices which have occurred since the last advisory vote on executivecompensation, including changes made in response to the outcome of a prior advisoryvote on executive compensation;]

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that a proposal as to whether to holdan advisory vote on executive compensation once every year, once every two years, oronce every three years shall be included in the proxy statement and submitted to the

73RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (86)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

stockholders of the Corporation for a vote at the Corporation’s Annual Meeting ofStockholders; and

RESOLVED FURTHER, that the Board unanimously recommends that the stock-holders of the Corporation vote to approve, on an advisory basis, a frequency for hold-ing an advisory vote on executive compensation of [once every year] [once every twoyears] [once every three years] until the next advisory vote on the frequency of holdingan advisory vote on executive compensation.

General Authority

RESOLVED, that any and all actions heretofore taken by the officers and direc-tors of the Corporation, or any one or more of them, within the terms of the foregoingresolutions are hereby approved, adopted, ratified and confirmed in all respects anddeclared to be the valid and binding acts and deeds of the Corporation; and

RESOLVED FURTHER, that the officers of the Corporation are, and each ofthem is, hereby authorized, directed and empowered in the name and on behalf of theCorporation to take such further action, and to execute, acknowledge, certify, file,deliver and record such documents, instruments, agreements, consents and certificates,as they or any of them in their discretion deem necessary or appropriate, to carry outthe purposes and intent of the foregoing resolutions, and that the execution by suchofficers of any such documents, instruments, agreements, consents and certificates orthe doing by them of any act in connection with the foregoing matters shall con-clusively establish their authority therefor from this Corporation and the approval andratification by this Corporation of the documents, instruments, agreements, consentsand certificates so executed and the actions so taken.

Resolutions for after the Annual Meeting

The following model resolutions can be utilized in preparing resolutions for thedetermination of the frequency of the Say-on-Pay vote following the annual meeting:

Approval of Frequency of Say-on-Pay Votes

WHEREAS, at the recently completed Annual Meeting of Stockholders of theCorporation, it was determined that, with respect to the resolution on the frequency ofholding an advisory vote on executive compensation, the option of once every [oneyear][two years][three years] [received the highest number of votes cast by thestockholders] and, accordingly, such frequency is the preferred frequency with which

74RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (87)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

the Corporation is to hold a stockholder vote, on an advisory basis, to approve thecompensation of the named executive officers, as disclosed pursuant to the Securitiesand Exchange Commission’s compensation disclosure rules (which disclosure shallinclude the Summary Compensation Table and the other related tables and disclosure);and

[WHEREAS, the Board believes that an annual advisory vote on executive com-pensation will allow the Corporation’s stockholders to provide the Corporation withtheir direct input on the Corporation’s compensation philosophy, policies and practicesas disclosed in the Corporation’s proxy statement every year and that an annual advi-sory vote on executive compensation is consistent with the Corporation’s generalpolicy of seeking input from, and engaging in discussions with, the Corporation’sstockholders on corporate governance matters and the Corporation’s executivecompensation philosophy, policies and practices;]

[WHEREAS, the Board believes that an advisory vote on executive compensationthat occurs once [every three years][every two years] will provide stockholders withsufficient time to evaluate the effectiveness of the Corporation’s overall compensationphilosophy, policies and practices in the context of long-term business results for thecorresponding period, while avoiding over-emphasis on short-term variations in com-pensation and business results; and that an advisory vote occurring once [every threeyears][every two years] will also permit the Corporation’s stockholders to observe andevaluate the impact of any changes to the Corporation’s executive compensation poli-cies and practices which have occurred since the last advisory vote on executivecompensation, including changes made in response to the outcome of a prior advisoryvote on executive compensation;]

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Board hereby determines that,in light of the preferred frequency determined by the Corporation’s stockholders at theAnnual Meeting of Stockholders, the Corporation shall include an advisory vote of thestockholders on executive compensation in the Corporation’s proxy materials onceevery [year][two years][three years] until the next required vote on the frequency ofstockholder votes on the compensation of executives of the Corporation; and

RESOLVED FURTHER, that the officers of the Corporation are, and each ofthem is, hereby authorized, directed and empowered in the name and on behalf of theCorporation to implement the foregoing policy of the Corporation.

75RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (88)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

General Authority

RESOLVED, that any and all actions heretofore taken by the officers and direc-tors of the Corporation, or any one or more of them, within the terms of the foregoingresolutions are hereby approved, adopted, ratified and confirmed in all respects anddeclared to be the valid and binding acts and deeds of the Corporation; and

RESOLVED FURTHER, that the officers of the Corporation are, and each ofthem is, hereby authorized, directed and empowered in the name and on behalf of theCorporation to take such further action, and to execute, acknowledge, certify, file,deliver and record such documents, instruments, agreements, consents and certificates,as they or any of them in their discretion deem necessary or appropriate, to carry outthe purposes and intent of the foregoing resolutions, and that the execution by suchofficers of any such documents, instruments, agreements, consents and certificates orthe doing by them of any act in connection with the foregoing matters shall con-clusively establish their authority therefor from this Corporation and the approval andratification by this Corporation of the documents, instruments, agreements, consentsand certificates so executed and the actions so taken.

76RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (89)

CHAPTER 3

KEY DISCLOSURE CONSIDERATIONSFOR PROXY STATEMENTS AND

ANNUAL REPORTS

77RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (90)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

KEY DISCLOSURE CONSIDERATIONS FORPROXY STATEMENTS AND ANNUAL REPORTS

SEC REVIEW PROCESS

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”) requires the SEC toreview the Form 10-K of every public issuer at least once every three years. BeginningJanuary 1, 2012, the SEC has released filing review correspondence no earlier than 20business days following the completion of a filing review. As a result of the publicavailability of these letters, the Staff has come to expect that issuers are aware of theinterpretive positions taken by the SEC in their comment letters, which often reflectnuanced readings of the rules or require more detailed disclosure than might otherwisebe expected. It has become increasingly important that issuers make themselves famil-iar with Staff comment letters that have been issued to other issuers, so that they canrespond to the issues raised in those letters when preparing their own filings. The SECStaff has also noted that issuers should be cognizant of the information provided inresponse to comments from the Staff, given that the public release of those responsesmakes the responses a part of the issuer’s public disclosures.

In the past, the Staff of the Division of Corporation Finance has often limited itsreview to financial statements and related disclosure. However, recently the Staff hasbeen conducting more complete legal reviews of periodic reports. In addition, reviewof executive compensation disclosures has been integrated into the Form 10-K andproxy statement review process, and comment letters often include at least one to twocomments on executive compensation. Below is an analysis of recent frequent areas ofStaff comment in Form 10-Ks and proxy statements. Attention to these areas duringthe drafting process can save time and effort later, when the filings become subject toStaff review.

SEC COMMENTS ON EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION DISCLOSURE

Over the past several years, the SEC has provided significant guidance withrespect to its interpretation of executive compensation disclosure rules, includingnumerous Staff speeches, new and revised Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations,its “Staff Observations in the Review of Executive Compensation” (which wasreleased in October 2007 following a review of the disclosure of 350 issuers), andStaff comments on individual filings. Historically, the Staff has addressed executivecompensation disclosure deficiencies identified in the review process by issuing“futures” comments, which require an issuer to address any identified deficiencies in

78RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (91)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

future filings. However, that approach has begun to change. In a November 2009speech, Shelley Parratt, Deputy Director of the Division of Corporation Finance,stated:

“[A]fter three years of futures comments, we expect companies and their advi-sors to understand our rules and apply them thoroughly. So, any company thatwaits until it receives Staff comments to comply with the disclosure require-ments should be prepared to amend its filings if it does not materially complywith the rules.”

Under the Staff’s new approach, it has become increasingly likely that the SECwill require that issuers amend disclosure if it believes that the issuer has not appropri-ately followed outstanding Staff guidance. Issuers should attempt to address in theirdisclosure the issues that are most often raised by the Staff during the review process.

In her November 2009 speech, Ms. Parratt urged issuers to focus on several key areasof executive compensation disclosure, as well as consider the comments, reports andspeeches on CD&A provided by the Staff over the years. In particular, Ms. Parratt pro-vided the following recommendations for preparing 2010 proxy statement disclosures:

• Explain why compensation decisions were made in the context of addressingthe decision-making processes;

• Disclose any material performance targets used in determining executivecompensation for the named executive officers for the periods covered bythe disclosure, as well as the actual achievement level against the targets;

• In the event of Staff review, be prepared to explain how disclosure ofmaterial performance targets would cause competitive harm when that is thebasis for omitting the performance target disclosure;

• Provide meaningful disclosure regarding the degree of difficulty in achievingperformance targets when those targets are omitted;

• Disclose the names of any peer group companies used for benchmarkingpurposes, how those companies were selected, and how the actual awardscompared to the benchmarks; and

• In addition to addressing the examples provided in Item 402(b) of Regu-lation S-K, provide additional disclosure in the CD&A that would bematerial to an understanding of an issuer’s compensation policies or deci-sions.

79RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (92)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

TRENDS IN EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION COMMENTS

There are a number of significant areas of focus in Staff comments and other inter-pretive guidance on executive compensation disclosure. For example, the Staff hasrepeatedly stated that an issuer’s CD&A should focus on how and why the issuerarrived at specific executive compensation decisions and policies and should addresswhy specific compensation decisions were made. Issuers frequently receive commentson this issue during the review process. Other principal areas of SEC comment in theCD&A have related to the disclosure of incentive plan performance targets, individualperformance goals and benchmarking practices or processes.

Meaningful Analysis in the Compensation Discussion & Analysis

The Staff has repeatedly requested that issuers provide more detailed, meaningfulanalysis in the CD&A. Issuers should discuss both how and why they arrived atspecific compensation decisions. In addition to identifying what the goals of thecompensation program are, issuers should also identify the reasons for individualawards to named executive officers, as well as how those awards fit into the issuer’soverall compensation objectives. The Staff expects issuers to provide detailed, specificanalysis.

The Staff generally views as insufficient any discussion of award decisions thataddresses all named executive officers as a group and does not address each namedexecutive officer’s individual circ*mstances. In addition, as part of the analysis of thereasons for each element of compensation (e.g., base salary, cash incentive award orequity award) for each named executive officer, the Staff expects a discussion of whythe compensation committee decided to award specific amounts or make changes in anelement of compensation from period to period. For example, this discussion shouldinclude the reasons the compensation for a named executive officer increased ordecreased as compared to prior periods, as well as how the compensation committeearrived at its decision.

Disclosure of Performance Targets

Another focus of Staff comments on CD&A is on the disclosure of performancetargets as they relate to executive compensation. Issuers are required to disclose anyspecific items of corporate performance that are taken into account in setting compen-sation policies and making compensation decisions. In addition to disclosing anymaterial performance targets, issuers are expected to disclose the extent to which thoseperformance targets were achieved. However, they are not required to disclose any

80RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (93)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

performance targets that are not material or that would cause competitive harm to theissuer (applying the same competitive harm standard that is applied to confidentialtreatment requests).

Some issuers have chosen not to disclose performance targets in reliance on theargument that this disclosure would cause competitive harm to the issuer. However,the Staff has focused significant attention on the competitive harm argument in itscomments and has limited the extent to which issuers may rely on it. The Staff hasrepeatedly required issuers to justify their use of the standard, sometimes goingbeyond the standards generally applied to confidential treatment requests. Issuers havebeen asked to specifically identify the nature of the competitive harm that they wouldsuffer if the performance targets were to be disclosed, including how the issuer’scompetitors would actually use the information. If the Staff accepts the competitiveharm argument, performance targets are not disclosed based on the competitive harmexception, then the issuer must disclose the level of difficulty associated with achiev-ing the undisclosed goal.

The Staff is more likely to accept that disclosure of a performance target wouldcause competitive harm in the context of non-financial operational performance targetsor performance goals related to specific business units. The Staff will generally notaccept the argument that the disclosure of financial information or financial targets fora completed fiscal year will cause competitive harm. If the performance target relatesto a completed fiscal year, the Staff position is that, because the issuer’s financialresults have already been publicly disclosed, no competitive harm should arise fromthe disclosure in the CD&A of the financial performance target and the extent to whichit was met. However, the Staff generally does not require disclosure of financial per-formance targets for the current or a future period, if the issuer is able to argue thatthose current or future period targets are not material to an understanding ofcompensation policies and decisions with respect to the fiscal year being discussed inthe CD&A.

If issuers use non-GAAP performance targets, the Staff requires that the non-GAAP performance targets be disclosed in the CD&A, together with an explanation ofhow it is calculated. However, a full-scale reconciliation to GAAP is not required.

Individual Performance Goals

Staff comments on CD&A have also focused on disclosure of individual perform-ance goals for named executive officers. Issuers often provide general disclosure that

81RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (94)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

states that some percentage or component of executive compensation is based on ach-ievement of individual performance goals. However, the Staff raises a concern ifsufficient disclosure of how the level of individual achievement affects the actualcompensation received by the executive, or why the compensation committee adoptedthe performance goal and how achievement is measured.

The Staff has repeatedly requested that issuers provide more specific disclosure inthis area. Issuers must identify the extent to which achievement of individual perform-ance goals impacts compensation for each named executive officer. If individual per-formance goals were a material factor in determining compensation, issuers mustdisclose the specific performance goals and achievements, even if the performancetargets are subjective and not quantifiable. Disclosure of specific performance targetsmay not be required if the performance target was not a material factor in determiningcompensation, for example if it was just one factor among many taken into account bythe compensation committee. However, formulaic, objective or quantifiable perform-ance targets should generally be disclosed in the Staff’s view.

The Staff has also requested that issuers provide additional disclosure when thecompensation committee has approved compensation in excess of or less than what isprovided for in the issuer’s compensation plans, or when the overall amount to whichthe executive is entitled under the program has been increased or decreased as a resultof the executive’s individual performance. In those situations, issuers have been askedto disclose the activities or individual performance standards that were applied inmaking that decision, as well as how the compensation committee considered thosestandards when making its decision.

Benchmarking

The use of benchmarking in the CD&A is another area of Staff focus throughoutthe comment process. It is important to note that many issuers use the term“benchmarking” in their CD&As when they are not in fact benchmarking as that termis understood by the SEC. For purposes of the CD&A, benchmarking refers to thetying of specific elements of compensation to a benchmark, as opposed to, for exam-ple, simply using comparable company data as a market check after arriving atcompensation decisions based on some other method. As another example, a companyis benchmarking when it ties base salaries to a certain targeted range (for example, themedian level) within a set of peer companies. Issuers that do not engage in benchmark-ing should modify their disclosure in the CD&A to clarify how they use comparativeissuer information.

82RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (95)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

For issuers that do engage in benchmarking, the Staff has consistently requestedthat all of the companies comprising the peer group or survey be listed and that theissuer describe the methodology it uses for assessing and utilizing the information. Theissuer must also identify where its compensation plan falls within the targeted parame-ters. If its compensation falls outside of the targeted range, the issuer is asked to pro-vide an explanation of the change.

COMMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS ON CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

DISCLOSURE

Background

On December 16, 2009, the SEC adopted, in SEC Release No. 33-9089(December 16, 2009), rule changes that mandate more disclosure in proxy andinformation statements regarding risk, compensation and corporate governance mat-ters. Specifically, the changes require disclosure concerning:

• The relationship of an issuer’s compensation policies and practices to riskmanagement, when those compensation policies and practices create risksthat are reasonably likely to have a material adverse effect on the issuer;

• The grant date fair value of equity awards in the Summary CompensationTable, replacing the prior approach of requiring disclosure of the amounts ofcompensation expense recognized for financial reporting purposes;

• The potential conflicts of interest that compensation consultants may havewhen performing services for the issuer, focusing on disclosure of fees paid(subject to a $120,000 threshold) for executive compensation services andfor additional services;

• The background and qualifications of directors and nominees for director,describing the experience and skills that led the issuer to choose the directoror nominee for the board;

• Other public company directorships held by each director or nominee overthe past five years;

• Legal proceedings involving an issuer’s executive officers, directors, andnominees for director, including disclosure covering the past ten years andcovering a significantly expanded list of relevant proceedings;

83RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (96)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

• The board of directors’ consideration of diversity in the process by whichdirectors are considered for nomination to the board;

• The leadership structure of the board, including whether the issuer has com-bined or separated the roles of chairman and principal executive officer, andwhy the issuer believes that its leadership structure is appropriate for theissuer, as well as a discussion, in some circ*mstances, of whether and whyan issuer has a lead independent director;

• The extent of the board’s role in the oversight of risk; and

• Voting results, which are to be provided on a significantly accelerated basisunder cover of Form 8-K.

These rule changes were effective on February 28, 2010, and were first includedin proxy statements for annual meetings occurring in 2010.

The Relationship between Compensation and Risk

The SEC adopted Item 402(s) of Regulation S-K, which elicits disclosure aboutthe relationship of risk to the compensation policies and practices for all employees,not just the executive officers of the issuer. This disclosure is limited to compensationpolicies and practices, however, such that no further disclosure regarding the specificamounts of compensation paid to employees would be required under the rule. Inresponse to commenters’ concerns that this disclosure may be confusing if included aspart of the CD&A, the SEC decided to require the disclosure outside of the CD&A,under a discrete disclosure requirement. Nonetheless, disclosure concerning the rela-tionship between compensation and risk may be required in the CD&A specificallywith regard to the named executive officers, consistent with the guidance that the SECprovided in both the proposing and adopting releases for this rule change, which bothstated that “[t]o the extent … such risk considerations are a material aspect of thecompany’s compensation policies or decisions for named executive officers, thecompany is required to discuss them as part of its CD&A under the current rules.”

Requirements of Item 402(s) of Regulation S-K

As adopted, the disclosure is triggered if compensation policies and practicescreate risks that are “reasonably likely to have a material adverse effect” on the issuer.The standard of “reasonably likely to have a material adverse effect” tracks therequirements in Item 303 of Regulation S-K. In response to concerns expressed by

84RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (97)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

commenters, the SEC decided to adopt this higher standard relative to the proposedstandard, which looked to whether the compensation policies or practices “may have amaterial effect” on the issuer. In discussing these changes between the proposed ruleand the final rule, the SEC noted that this standard would be more familiar to issuers,given that it is applied in determining whether known material trends, demands,events, and uncertainties must be disclosed. Focusing the standard on whether the riskmay have a material adverse effect on the issuer also permits issuers to consider com-pensation policies and practices that mitigate or balance incentives. Further, the addi-tion of the term “adverse” to the test clarifies that issuers do not have to discuss waysin which compensation policies and practices may encourage risk taking that isbeneficial to the issuer.

The final rule includes a non-exclusive list of situations where compensationprograms may have the potential to cause material adverse risks for issuers. Theseinclude compensation policies and practices:

• At a business unit of the issuer that carries a significant portion of the issu-er’s risk profile;

• At a business unit with compensation structured significantly differentlythan other units within the issuer;

• At a business unit that is significantly more profitable than others within theissuer;

• At a business unit where the compensation expense is a significant percent-age of the unit’s revenues; and

• That vary significantly from the overall risk and reward structure of theissuer, such as when bonuses are awarded upon accomplishment of a task,while the income and risk to the issuer from the task extend over a sig-nificantly longer period of time.

Further, the final rule includes a non-exclusive list of illustrative examples of thetype of issues that an issuer may need to address if it has determined that compensa-tion policies and practices create risks that are reasonably likely to have a materialadverse effect on the issuer. These issues include:

• The general design philosophy of the issuer’s compensation policies andpractices for employees whose behavior would be most affected by the

85RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (98)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

incentives established by the policies and practices, as such policies andpractices relate to or that affect risk taking by those employees on behalf ofthe issuer, and the manner of their implementation;

• The issuer’s risk assessment or incentive considerations, if any, in structur-ing its compensation policies and practices or in awarding and paying com-pensation;

• How the issuer’s compensation policies and practices relate to the realizationof risks resulting from the actions of employees in both the short term andthe long term, such as through policies requiring clawbacks or imposingholding periods;

• The issuer’s policies regarding adjustments to its compensation policies andpractices to address changes in its risk profile;

• Material adjustments the issuer has made to its compensation policies andpractices as a result of changes in its risk profile; and

• The extent to which the issuer monitors its compensation policies and practi-ces to determine whether its risk management objectives are being met withrespect to incentivizing its employees.

This disclosure regarding the relationship between compensation and risk is notrequired for those issuers that qualify for scaled disclosure as a smaller reportingcompany.

The rule does not require an issuer to make an affirmative statement that it hasdetermined that risks arising from compensation policies and practices are not reason-ably likely to have a material adverse effect on the issuer, although issuers may need toconsider whether to add such a statement, as well as an explanation of the issuer’sprocess for evaluating risks arising from compensation policies and practices, in orderto address the inevitable concerns of shareholders and proxy advisors.

SEC Staff Interpretations and Comments

During 2010, the Staff asked issuers what was done and what conclusion wasreached in response to this disclosure item, most likely as a first-year check on com-pliance with the new rule. The Staff asked for a supplemental explanation if the issuerincluded no disclosure in the proxy statement regarding the evaluation of the relation-ship between employee compensation and risk; or if the issuer included only a state-

86RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (99)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

ment of a conclusion without a description of the process; or where an issuer didinclude some discussion of the process undertaken, but did not include a fulsome dis-cussion of the process.

In each of these situations, the Staff asked for a supplemental explanation of theprocess undertaken to reach the conclusion that compensation policies are not reason-ably likely to have a material adverse effect on the issuer. In many of the responses,issuers describe a process whereby compensation programs were reviewed, partic-ularly focusing on incentive compensation programs and program features whichcould potentially encourage risk taking. These processes involved identifying the spe-cific business risks that related to these compensation features, as well as “mitigating”factors that offset the risks. Issuers consistently undertook an analysis to determine thepotential effects of the risks and the impact of the other factors considered, andwhether any of the particular situations described in Item 402(s) applied to the issuer.In most cases, issuers indicated that the compensation committee was involved insome capacity with the analysis; responses often noted that the analysis was conductedby management with the concurrence of or consultation with the compensation com-mittee.

The findings that companies often reached were similar, focusing on:

• The mix of compensation, which tended to be balanced with an emphasistoward rewarding long-term performance;

• The use of multiple performance metrics that are closely aligned with strate-gic business goals;

• The use of discretion as a means to adjust compensation downward to reflectperformance or other factors;

• Caps on incentive compensation arrangements;

• The lack of highly leveraged payout curves;

• Multi-year time vesting on equity awards which requires long-term commit-ment on the part of employees;

• The governance, code of conduct, internal control and other measuresimplemented by the company;

• The role of the compensation committee in its oversight of pay programs;

87RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (100)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

• Frequent business reviews;

• The existence of compensation recovery policies;

• The implementation of stock ownership or stock holding requirements;

• The use of benchmarking to ensure the compensation programs are con-sistent with industry practice;

• The uniformity of compensation programs across business units and geo-graphic regions, or alternatively, the differences employed to reflect specificbusiness unit or geographic considerations; and

• The immaterial nature of some plans.

Changes to the Summary Compensation Table and the Director CompensationTable

In the 2006 changes to the executive compensation disclosure rules, the SECrequired disclosure in the Summary Compensation Table of the compensation expenseassociated with equity awards (which included expensed amounts related to awardsgranted in prior fiscal years), rather than the grant date fair value of the awards madein the subject fiscal year covered in the Summary Compensation Table.

This approach created difficulties for issuers when presenting their executivecompensation disclosure, because the presentation in the Summary CompensationTable of equity award values did not necessarily correspond with decisions that thecompensation committee made in the fiscal year covered by the CD&A. In order toaddress this disconnect, some issuers began including “alternative summarycompensation tables” and taking other approaches to try to clarify how the decisionsaddressed in the CD&A related to the amounts presented for the named executive offi-cers.

Accordingly, as part of the December 2009 amendments, the SEC adoptedchanges that now require the disclosure of the grant date fair value of the equityawards made during the fiscal year in the “Option Awards” and “Stock Awards”columns of the Summary Compensation Table and the Director Compensation Table.These numbers reflect the grant date fair values calculated in accordance with theFinancial Accounting Standards Board’s Accounting Standards Codification Topic718 (formerly known as FAS 123R and referred to here as “ASC Topic 718”). Forperformance-based awards, the SEC requires reporting of the fair value at the grant

88RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (101)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

date based on the probable outcome of the performance conditions (rather than themaximum potential value of the award), which should be consistent with the estimateof aggregate compensation cost to be recognized over the service period determined asof the grant date under ASC Topic 718. The maximum potential value of the awards isdisclosed in a footnote to the Summary Compensation Table and the DirectorCompensation Table.

Issuers are required to report the full grant date fair value of each equity award inthe Grants of Plan-Based Awards Table. Performance-based equity awards reported inthe Grants of Plan-Based Awards Table are reported based on the probable outcome ofmeeting the performance condition, as with the Summary Compensation Table.

The SEC decided not to adopt a proposed change to its rules that would havepermitted issuers to report salary and bonus foregone at the named executive officer’selection in the appropriate column for the award elected. As a result, salary and bonusis reported in the “Salary” and “Bonus” columns even when foregone at the namedexecutive officer’s election, with footnote disclosure indicating receipt of the non-cashcompensation and referring to the Grants of Plan-Based Awards Table where thestock, option, or non-equity incentive plan compensation is reported.

Compensation Consultant Conflicts

The rules require disclosure about fees paid to compensation consultants and theiraffiliates in specified circ*mstances.

In particular, if the board, compensation committee, or other persons performingan equivalent function (referred to in this section as the “board”) has engaged its owncompensation consultant to provide advice or recommendations regarding the amountor form of executive and director compensation, and this same consultant or the con-sultant’s affiliates provide other consulting services to the issuer (which consultingservices do not involve executive compensation) in an amount that exceeds $120,000during the last fiscal year, then the issuer must disclose:

• The aggregate fees paid for services provided either to the board or theissuer with regard to determining or recommending the amount or form ofexecutive and director compensation;

• The aggregate fees paid for any additional services provided by the con-sultant or its affiliates; and

89RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (102)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

• Whether the decision to engage the compensation consultant or its affiliatesfor the non-executive compensation consulting services was made, or recom-mended by, management and whether the board approved such other services.

In situations where the board has not engaged its own consultant, then disclosuresare required if a consultant is engaged to provide both executive compensationconsulting services and non-executive compensation consulting services to the issuer,provided that the fees for the non-executive compensation consulting services exceed$120,000 during the issuer’s fiscal year. In this situation, disclosure is required of:

• The aggregate fees paid to the consultant or its affiliates for determining orrecommending the amount or form of executive and director compensation;and

• The aggregate fees paid for any additional services provided by the con-sultant or its affiliates.

If the board and management have different compensation consultants, then no feedisclosure is required even if management’s compensation consultant provides additionalservices to the issuer, recognizing that when the board engages its own compensationconsultant, it mitigates the risks for the conflicts of interest that the SEC is seeking toaddress with the additional fee disclosure. Moreover, disclosure is not required when thecompensation consultant’s only role in recommending the amount or form of executive ordirector compensation is limited to consulting on broad-based plans that do not discrim-inate in favor of executive officers or directors of the issuer. Disclosure is also not requiredwhen the compensation consultant’s services are limited to providing information, such assurveys, that is not customized for a particular issuer, or that is customized based onparameters that were not developed by the compensation consultant.

The SEC did not adopt a proposed requirement to disclose the nature and extentof additional services provided by the compensation consultant or its affiliates, giventhe potentially competitive nature of this information. Issuers still may provide someexplanation of the types of services provided, if the additional information is necessaryto an understanding of a potential conflict of interest.

Director and Nominee Qualifications

Requirements

The SEC adopted revisions to Item 401 of Regulation S-K, which sets forth dis-closure requirements for the backgrounds of executive officers, directors, and nomi-

90RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (103)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

nees for director, to require pursuant to Item 401(e)(1) of Regulation S-K, for eachdirector and any nominee for director, disclosure of the particular experience, qual-ifications, attributes, or skills that led the board to conclude that the person shouldserve as a director of the issuer, as of the time that the filing is made with the SEC.The disclosure is required for all nominees for director (including nominees put for-ward by a proponent other than the issuer), as well as for all existing directors, even ifnot subject to re-election at the meeting to which the proxy statement relates. Thisdirector and nominee disclosure requirement augments, but does not replace, specificdisclosure required regarding the consideration by the nominating committee of mini-mum director qualifications, or specific qualities or skills.

The disclosure requirement does not mandate the particular information that mustbe disclosed. Rather, the SEC indicated that it wanted to provide issuers with flexi-bility to determine what information concerning a director’s or nominee’s skills, qual-ifications, or particular area of expertise should be disclosed to shareholders.

The SEC did not adopt a proposal to require disclosure of the specific experience,qualifications or skills that qualify a director to serve as a member of a particularcommittee. However, the SEC has noted in the adopting release that if the director or anominee has been chosen to join the board because of particular expertise that is rele-vant to a specific committee, then that fact should be disclosed in response to the dis-closure item.

SEC Staff Interpretations and Comments

In Regulation S-K Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations Question 116.05,the Staff made clear that it intended for issuers to disclose why the person’s particularand specific experience, qualifications, attributes or skills led the board to concludethat such person should serve as a director of the issuer, so that disclosures made on agroup basis would be unacceptable, even if the directors or nominees share similarcharacteristics.

Further, in Regulation S-K Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations Question116.06, the Staff noted that an issuer with a classified board needs to provide theItem 401(e)(1) disclosure for the entire board, focusing on the evaluation of the direc-tor’s particular and specific experience, qualifications, attributes or skills, and theconclusion on why the director should continue serving on the board, as of the timethat a filing containing the disclosure is made. The Staff noted that this interpretationmay necessitate adding in additional disclosure controls and procedures to ensure that

91RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (104)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

such information about directors who are not up for re-election at the upcoming share-holders’ meeting is recorded, processed, summarized and reported in a timely manner.

The Staff raised a number of comments on the director qualifications disclosureprovided in the 2010 proxy season, including the following:

• Omission of Required Disclosure. One consistent Staff comment on thegovernance disclosures, including the director qualification disclosures, wasa comment asking the issuer to include the disclosure when it was notincluded. Perhaps because the rules became effective immediately before theproxy season, a surprising number of issuers did not comply with some or allof the new governance disclosure requirements in 2010. Given that it wasthe first year the disclosure was required, the Staff generally did not requestthat the issuers file an amendment to the Form 10-K to include the requireddisclosure, but rather allowed issuers to remedy the situation in future fil-ings.

• Specificity of the Disclosure. In June 2010, SEC Chairman Mary Schapiromade a speech at the Stanford Directors’ College where she discussed theadequacy of compliance with the new director qualifications disclosure item.She gave examples of actual good and bad disclosures (without identifyingthe issuers) to demonstrate the point that the disclosure should beindividualized for each director and should avoid over-generalizations suchas “our directors each have integrity, sound business judgment and honesty,which are important characteristics of a good board member.” ChairmanSchapiro’s viewpoint was borne out through the Staff comment process,where the Staff frequently asked for an explicit description of the qual-ifications and experience over and above the basic biographical descriptionthat has been required by Item 401 of Regulation S-K, emphasizing that thedisclosure needed to communicate how the specific qualifications, attributesor skills led to the conclusion that the director should serve on the particularissuer’s board.

• Location of the Disclosure. The Staff did not typically raise comments con-cerning where issuers actually placed the director qualification disclosure. Inmany instances, the director qualification disclosure was included as a sepa-rate paragraph following each director’s biographical information; in othercases, the disclosure was incorporated directly into the biography paragraphor included in a separate section entirely.

92RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (105)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

• Directors Serving Under a Shareholder Agreement. Many issuers have direc-tors who serve because a shareholder has appointed the director to servepursuant to some contractual or other arrangement, or particular shareholdersnominate and elect certain directors under the terms of the issuer’s charter,bylaws or other governing documents. In cases where issuers sought toreference only the shareholder agreement or arrangement as the basis for theconclusion as to why the director serves on the board, the Staff asked for themore complete description of the director’s qualifications, even if thatinformation had to be obtained from the shareholder.

Outside Directorships

The SEC also adopted a requirement for disclosure regarding other public com-pany directorships held by directors or nominees over the past five years (even if adirector is no longer serving as a director of the other public company). This require-ment expands upon previously required disclosure regarding current director positionsat other public companies.

Legal Proceedings

Item 401(f) of Regulation S-K previously required disclosure regarding a direc-tor’s, nominee’s, or executive officer’s involvement in specific legal proceedings thatare material to an evaluation of the integrity of such person. The SEC has extended the“look back” provision in Item 401(f) from five years to ten years, and now requiresdisclosure regarding the following additional legal proceedings:

• Any judicial or administrative proceedings resulting from involvement inmail or wire fraud or fraud in connection with any business entity;

• Any judicial or administrative proceedings based on violations of federal orstate securities, commodities, banking, or insurance laws and regulations, orany settlement of such actions; and

• Any disciplinary sanctions or orders imposed by stock, commodities, orderivatives exchanges or other self-regulatory organizations.

The rules do not require disclosure of a settlement of a civil proceeding amongprivate parties. As is the case before these amendments, the disclosure of specific legalproceedings (including the newly added proceedings specified above) are not requiredto be disclosed if the proceeding is not material to an evaluation of the ability orintegrity of the director or director nominee.

93RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (106)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

Director Diversity

Requirements

The rules require disclosure of whether and, if so, how the nominating committeeconsiders diversity in identifying director nominees. Further, if the nominatingcommittee or the board has a policy with regard to the consideration of diversity inidentifying director nominees, then disclosure is required of how the policy isimplemented and monitored for effectiveness. In adopting this new requirement, theSEC has not defined the term “diversity,” leaving it to each issuer to define diversity inthe way that the issuer deems appropriate. The SEC noted that some issuers maydefine diversity to include “differences of viewpoint, professional experience, educa-tion, skill and other qualities or attributes that contribute to board heterogeneity,”while other issuers may define diversity to include race, gender and national origin.

SEC Staff Interpretations and Comments

In some cases, issuers expressly disclaimed any policy on diversity, but the Staffconsistently raised a comment requesting the “policy” disclosure whenever diversity ismentioned in a filing. In many cases, issuers have addressed diversity in the context ofthe director qualifications considered in the nomination process, and even if the word“diversity” is not used directly, but the disclosure implies the consideration of a broadrange of skills and qualifications, the Staff will raise a comment asking for the com-plete diversity disclosure. As a result, the Staff’s interpretation contemplates the policydisclosure whenever diversity (however defined) is considered, even if no such policyis actually articulated in writing. The additional disclosure required once it isdetermined that a diversity “policy” exists involves discussing how the policy has beenimplemented (i.e., through the nominating committee process) and how it is monitored(i.e., typically through the annual committee and/or board self-evaluation process).

Board Leadership Structure

Requirements

Under Item 407(h) of Regulation S-K, an issuer must disclose whether and why ithas chosen to combine or separate the principal executive officer and board chairmanpositions, as well as the reasons why the issuer believes that this board leadershipstructure is the most appropriate structure for the issuer at the time of the applicablefiling. In those situations where there is a combined principal executive officer andboard chairman, but also a lead independent director, then the issuer must disclose

94RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (107)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

whether and why the issuer has a lead independent director and the specific role thatthe lead independent director plays in the leadership of the issuer. Further, the issuermust explain the effect that the board’s role in the oversight of risk has on the leader-ship structure.

SEC Staff Interpretations and Comments

The Staff’s main focus in the comment process has been on eliciting a specificdiscussion of why the leadership structure is appropriate given the specific character-istics or circ*mstances of the issuer. In some cases, issuers did not explain why eitherthe combined or separate Chairman/CEO made particular sense in light of an issuer’sparticular circ*mstances. This problem was particularly evident for issuers with aseparate Chairman/CEO leadership structure, because that structure has historicallybeen seen as a “good” governance practice. Nonetheless, the Staff has raised thecomment asking for a more detailed explanation, even in those situations where theseparate Chairman/CEO structure was in place. Issuers tended to not always includedisclosures responsive to the requirement to explain the effect that the board’s role inthe oversight of risk has on the leadership structure, so the Staff frequently raised acomment seeking full compliance with Item 407(h). Some issuers chose to say that theboard’s role in the oversight of risk had no effect on the board leadership structure,while others focused on the interaction of the interested committees with the Chairmanand/or CEO in the course of overseeing the issuer’s risk management.

The Board’s Oversight of Risk

The SEC mandates disclosure about the board’s involvement in the oversight ofthe issuer’s risk management process. Issuers have flexibility under this disclosurerequirement to describe how the oversight role is exercised, i.e., whether it is throughthe activities of the entire board, a risk committee of the board, or another committeeof the board, such as the audit committee. The SEC also indicates that, where relevant,issuers may want to address whether the individuals who supervise risk managementreport to the board or a board committee, or otherwise how the board or the appro-priate committee receives information from risk managers.

Accelerated Disclosure of Voting Results

Prior to the SEC’s action in 2009, voting results from annual or special meetingswere required to be disclosed in periodic reports on Form 10-Q or 10-K, whichresulted in a significant delay in the time between when the meeting occurred andwhen shareholders learned of the results from their voting decisions. The SEC moved

95RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (108)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

the requirement for disclosure of voting results from Forms 10-Q and 10-K to Form 8-K. Now, voting results are filed under Item 5.07 of Form 8-K within four businessdays after the end of the meeting at which the vote was held.

In order to accommodate situations where it may be difficult to determine finalvoting results within the four-day filing window, the SEC provided an Instruction toItem 5.07 which indicates that an issuer is required to file preliminary voting resultswithin four days after the end of the shareholders’ meeting, and then file an amendedForm 8-K within four business days after the final voting results are known. If defini-tive voting results are obtained within the initial four day filing window, then thosedefinitive results may be filed and no preliminary results need be filed.

AREAS OF FOCUS IN SEC COMMENTS ON ANNUAL REPORTS

Recent Staff comments reflect the trend of Staff review of both legal and account-ing or financial disclosures in the Form 10-K. Recent areas of frequent Staff commenthave addressed disclosure of goodwill impairment charges, liquidity, debt covenants,disclosure controls and procedures, risk factors and exhibits. Each of these areas isfurther discussed below.

MANAGEMENT ’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS

Impairments

One of the most frequent areas of Staff comment on Form 10-Ks relates to dis-closure of goodwill impairment. The Staff may request additional supplementalinformation or disclosure if an issuer has taken an impairment charge, but it has alsoraised comments if no impairment charge has been taken but goodwill accounts for asignificant portion of total assets and there are downward trends in revenue, income orstock price. In situations where the issuer has already taken a goodwill impairmentcharge, the Staff may request that issuers discuss the primary drivers in assumptionsthat resulted in the charge. For example, the issuer may be asked whether it sig-nificantly reduced projected future revenues or net cash flows or increased the dis-count rates, or whether it considered an economic recovery in its cash flowprojections. In addition, issuers are frequently asked to disclose expectations regardingfuture operating results and liquidity as a result of the impairment charge, including adiscussion of whether they expect historical operating results to be indicative of futureoperating results.

If an issuer has not taken an impairment charge but goodwill accounts for a sig-nificant portion of total assets and there are downward trends in revenue, income or

96RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (109)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

stock price, the Staff may issue comments related to the issuer’s goodwill impairmentanalysis. For example, the issuer may be asked to provide a more detailed descriptionof the steps it performs to review goodwill for recoverability, describe the nature of thevaluation techniques and significant estimates and assumptions employed to determinethe fair value in the impairment analysis and discuss whether there have been anychanges to the assumptions and methodologies used since the last impairment test. Inaddition, the issuer may be asked to discuss its estimates of future cash flows, includ-ing disclosures related to the cash flow growth rate used to determine the future cashflow projections.

The Staff may also ask issuers to break down goodwill by reporting unit. Issuersmay be requested to disclose any changes to reporting units or allocations of goodwillby reporting unit, as well as the reasons for these changes. The Staff may perform adetailed review of documentation related to the reporting structure in order todetermine whether there is a basis for the allocation decisions.

Liquidity

Another area of increased Staff comments in Form 10-Ks has been in the liquiditydisclosure of MD&A. The primary focus of Staff comments has been on how theeconomy has impacted the availability of cash and credit. Comments have reflected aconcern that an issuer’s risk factors and MD&A disclosure be consistent, and that theMD&A disclosure provide a sufficient level of detail about known trends, demands,events and uncertainties. The SEC has also released interpretive guidance related toliquidity disclosure in MD&A, which is described below in “Additional SEC Inter-pretive Guidance – Liquidity and Capital Resource Disclosure.”

Staff comments related to liquidity also address the disclosure of financial cove-nants related to debt instruments. Issuers have been asked to disclose the specific termsof material financial covenants in both the footnotes to financial statements andMD&A. Typically, this disclosure must include any required ratios, as well as actualratios as of the end of the period. As described below, the SEC has also issued inter-pretive guidance that provides that when management believes a financial covenant ismaterial to the issuer’s financial condition and/or liquidity, the financial covenantshould be disclosed even if it relies on a non-GAAP measure. The disclosure aroundthe non-GAAP measure should address the material terms of the credit agreement, theamount or limit required for compliance with the covenant, and the actual or reason-ably likely effects of compliance or non-compliance with the covenant on the issuer’sfinancial condition and liquidity. Issuers must also provide a reconciliation to GAAP.

97RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (110)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

The Staff has recently focused on the impact of offshore cash holding on the issu-er’s liquidity position. The Staff’s comments have focused on the extent to which U.S.taxation of funds repatriated into the country would limit the availability of that off-shore cash to satisfy the issuer’s liquidity obligations.

LOSS CONTINGENCY DISCLOSURES

The standard for loss contingency accounting and disclosure is Accounting Stan-dards Codification 450-20 (referred to as “ASC 450-20,” formerly known as Statementof Financial Accounting Standards No. 5). At the end of 2010, the Staff of the Divisionof Corporation Finance announced an increased focus on disclosures made in financialstatements, financial statement footnotes and in related disclosures when the Staffreviews Form 10-Ks in its regular review process.

Under ASC 450-20, each loss contingency must be classified as either a“probable” loss contingency, a “reasonably possible” loss contingency, or a “remote”loss contingency. Then, each loss contingency must be classified as either “reasonablyestimable” or “not reasonably estimable.” For probable loss contingencies, if the losscan be reasonably estimated, an issuer must record an accrual in the financial state-ments, disclose the nature of the accrued loss contingency in a footnote to the financialstatements, and, if necessary for the financial statements to not be misleading, disclosethe amount of the accrued loss contingency in a footnote to the financial statements.For reasonably possible loss contingencies (where it is determined that the con-tingency is less than probable but more than remote), no accrual is recorded in thefinancial statements, however, the issuer must disclose the nature of the loss con-tingency in a footnote to the financial statements. In addition, an issuer must disclosethe reasonable estimate of the possible loss in a footnote to the financial statements or,if that amount is not reasonably estimable, the issuer must include a statement in afootnote to the financial statements that such an estimate cannot be made. Althoughnot required by ASC 450-20, through the comment process the Staff has sought furtherdisclosure with regard to why a contingency is not reasonably estimable. With regardto remote loss contingencies (where there is only a slight chance that the contingencywill occur), no accrual is recorded in the financial statements, and no disclosureregarding the loss contingency is required in a footnote to the financial statements. Noaccrual or disclosure is required for loss contingencies that are immaterial to the issu-er’s financial statements, and when disclosure is required, reasonable aggregation hasbeen permitted.

98RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (111)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

The Staff has focused on often generic risk factor disclosure regarding the poten-tial material adverse effects of pending or future litigation, as well as legal proceedingsdisclosure which states that the issuer has no pending material litigation and no dis-closure regarding contingencies in their financial statements or the footnotes to thosefinancial statements. In these circ*mstances, the Staff has requested an explanation asto how these disclosures are consistent. Moreover, the Staff has raised commentswhere issuers do not use the specific language of ASC 450-20, and as a result, issuersshould specifically include disclosures regarding “contingencies,” rather than“liabilities” or “results,” and issuers should indicate that management believes that anycontingencies would not have a material effect on “the issuer’s financial statements,”rather than “the issuer’s results of operations” or “the issuer’s financial condition.”

The Staff’s comments have also focused on announcements of significant settle-ments of litigation or regulatory actions and the Staff will review loss contingencydisclosures in the periods prior to those settlements. The Staff will under these circum-stances review the disclosures of the issuer, as well as any disclosures made by the co-parties or counter-parties to the litigation. The Staff also regularly seeks backgroundinformation regarding the basis for “not reasonably estimable” determinations.

DISCLOSURE CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

The Staff has continued to issue comments requiring issuers to include the entiredefinition of disclosure controls and procedures in their filings, as the definition is set forthin Exchange Act Rule 13a-15(e). Rule 13a-15(e) defines the term disclosure controls andprocedures, then goes on to add “disclosure controls and procedures include, without limi-tation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosedby an issuer in the reports that it files or submits under the Act is accumulated andcommunicated to the issuer’s management, including its principal executive and principalfinancial officers, or persons performing similar functions, as appropriate to allow timelydecisions regarding required disclosure.” Issuers including part, but not all, of the abovelanguage will be asked to expand their disclosure to include it in its entirety. However,issuers may also limit their disclosure to state simply that their disclosure controls andprocedures are effective (or not effective). Issuers using the shortened term “disclosurecontrols” are asked to refer to “disclosure controls and procedures.” In addition, the Staffcontinues to focus on whether references to “reasonable assurance” are included in thedisclosure controls and procedures section, and, if so, whether the issuer has indicated thatthe principal executive officer and principal financial officer have concluded that dis-closure controls and procedures were effective at that reasonable assurance level.

99RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (112)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

RISK FACTORS

Recent Staff comments on risk factor disclosure in periodic reports have focusedon the following areas: reliance on customers, suppliers, governments and keyemployees; the market for an issuer’s products and services; the impact of regulatorychanges; cybersecurity risks; ineffective disclosure and internal controls; legalexposures and reliance on legal positions; conflicts of interest and related party trans-actions; a history of operating losses; and going concern issues. Issuers should reviewtheir risk factors to ensure that they provide adequate disclosure of these issues, to theextent they are applicable. In addition, issuers should ensure that they updated theirforward-looking statements disclaimer in conjunction with changes to their risk fac-tors.

EXHIBITS

Staff comments have recently addressed the practice of omitting schedules andexhibits to material agreements other than merger agreements. Staff comments havehighlighted that the exception permitting issuers to exclude schedules to a mergeragreement does not apply to other material agreements filed under Item 601(b)(10) ofRegulation S-K. Issuers have been asked to either provide a materiality analysisindicating that the omitted schedules and exhibits are not material, or to file the sched-ules and exhibits to the agreement as part of the agreement.

RESTATEMENTS

The Staff has noted that recent filing reviews have focused on issues arising inconnection with little “r” restatements, which generally occur in situations where animmaterial error that is not corrected over multiple periods eventually grows largeenough to become material and thus must be corrected. The Staff appears to be con-cerned in some cases with whether a little “r” restatement should in fact have been abig “R” restatement, based on the issuer’s assessment of materiality. Further, the Staffis concerned that issuers should address the extent to which the prior errors impact theconclusions that the issuer has made with regard to internal control over financialreporting and disclosure controls and procedures, and whether any material changes ininternal control over financial reporting must be disclosed.

The Staff’s typical comment regarding a little “r” restatement will point out theguidance in both SAB 108 and SAB 99. Among other guidance, SAB 99 points issuersto both the quantitative and qualitative considerations that must go into evaluatingmateriality. Among the qualitative factors that issuers will consider in connection with

100RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (113)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

little “r” restatements are: (1) the errors were capable of precise measurement andresulted from the misapplication of accounting policy; (2) the misstatements did notresult from an attempt to mask a change in earnings or other trends, nor to hide a fail-ure to meet analysts’ consensus expectations; (3) there was no change in loss toincome in any period (or vice-a-versa); (4) the errors do not relate to a particularsegment or other important aspect of the business; (5) there is no impact on com-pliance with any regulatory requirements as a result of the errors; (6) there is noimpact to debt covenants or any other contractual requirements as a result of the errors;(7) there is no impact on management’s compensation; and (8) the errors do not resultfrom an attempt to conceal an unlawful transaction.

The Staff appears to be concerned that, while the errors prompting a little “r”restatement do not lead to non-reliance on previously issued financial statements, thefact of a little “r” restatement nonetheless means that errors did occur in the prior peri-ods, and the existence of such errors may have an impact on the conclusions as to theeffectiveness of the issuer’s disclosure controls and procedures and internal controlover financial reporting. This concern arises because, from an evaluation of internalcontrols perspective, an issuer must demonstrate that the internal control deficienciesrelated to the errors did not result in a reasonable possibility that a material misstate-ment would not be prevented, or detected and corrected on a timely basis. In the eventthat the Staff cannot be convinced that the errors did not affect the conclusions as toeffectiveness of disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financialreporting, the issuer may find itself in the situation of having to go back and revisitthose conclusions in amended filings.

In evaluating whether the past deficiencies should be considered a significantdeficiency or a material weakness, the issuer must consider the following indicators:(1) there were no indications of fraud on the part of senior management; (2) the defi-ciencies did not result in a restatement of previously issued financial statements toreflect the correction of a material misstatement due to error or fraud; (3) the deficien-cies were not identified by the auditor under circ*mstances that indicate the misstate-ment would not otherwise have been detected by the entity’s internal control; and(4) the deficiencies were not the result of ineffective oversight of the issuer’s financialreporting and internal control by those charged with governance.

Issuers who receive a comment from the Staff will point to compensating controlswhich prevented the deficiency causing the error from becoming a material weakness(e.g., monthly reconciliations and income statement and balance sheet reviews). Fur-

101RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (114)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

ther, issuers sometimes point out the extent to which control issues that may have ledto the errors were later corrected before the controls were evaluated for effectiveness,in which case the Staff may ask whether such changes to internal control over financialreporting were material and were required to be disclosed. In this regard, issuers oftennote that while changes to internal controls have occurred as a result of identifying theerrors, no disclosure of such changes is required because the changes in internal con-trol over financial reporting did not materially affect, and are not reasonably likely tomaterially affect, the issuer’s internal control over financial reporting.

SEGMENT DISCLOSURE

The Staff has indicated that it is not using the chief operating decision maker(“CODM”) reports as a litmus test for segment reporting. The Staff will now look atthe issue of segment reporting more holistically in accordance with the accountingstandards. Without as much emphasis on the CODM reports, the Staff typically seeks amore detailed analysis from the issuer as to how all of the factors in ASC 280 havebeen considered in determining the issuer’s operating segments, and whether the issu-er’s operating segments are appropriately aggregated (focusing on the standard ofhaving similar economic characteristics and how the issuer has analyzed the five areasspecified in ASC 280). In many instances, the Staff’s comments have been focused onhow the issuer is considering its segment presentation in light of changes to the busi-ness over time. All in all, the Staff appears to be likely to employ the same level ofskepticism to segment disclosures, with or without asking for the CODM reports.

ADDITIONAL SEC INTERPRETIVE GUIDANCE

The SEC has also provided interpretive guidance outside of the comment processin several areas relevant to preparing Form 10-Ks and proxy statements.

Use of Non-GAAP Measures

On January 15, 2010, the Staff issued new Compliance and Disclosure Inter-pretations regarding the use of non-GAAP financial measures under Item 10(e) ofRegulation S-K. These revised interpretations related to the use of non-GAAP meas-ures arise out of the Staff’s concern that periodic reports have become “compliancedocuments” that do not sufficiently communicate issuers’ operating performance andfinancial condition in a manner that is consistent with the disclosure made by issuersoutside of their SEC filings. According to the Staff, the new interpretations are notintended to encourage an increased use of non-GAAP measures, but rather to improvedisclosure in SEC filings. By providing more flexibility to use non-GAAP measures in

102RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (115)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

periodic reports, the SEC is expecting issuers to provide a consistent message acrosstheir SEC filings and other public communications. The Staff has also made clear thatit reviews an issuer’s statements outside of SEC filings to determine whether an issu-er’s public statements, including those using non-GAAP financial measures, are con-sistent with disclosure in its SEC filings.

While the Staff has indicated that it is not seeking to require that issuers put non-GAAP measures in filings, some of the key Non-GAAP Financial Measures Com-pliance and Disclosure Interpretations provide additional flexibility that will facilitateinclusion of some non-GAAP measures in filings in compliance with Item 10(e) ofRegulation S-K. The key interpretations are as follows:

• Permitting Adjustments for Recurring Items. A frequent area of Staff com-ment has been with respect to Item 10(e)’s prohibition on adjustments that“eliminate or smooth items identified as non-recurring, infrequent orunusual” if the item occurred in the past two years or is reasonably likely tooccur in the next two years. The Staff’s comments have discouraged non-GAAP adjustments for what it views as recurring items even if there weresufficient additional disclosure to explain the nature of the item. Non-GAAPFinancial Measures Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations Question102.03 now permits the presentation of a non-GAAP measure that excludesa gain or charge that is recurring, as long as the issuer does not attempt torepresent that particular item as non-recurring, infrequent or unusual.

• Business Purpose Not Required for Use of Non-GAAP Measures. Non-GAAPFinancial Measures Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations Question102.04 clarifies that a non-GAAP measure may be included in an SEC filingeven when management does not use the measure for the purpose of managingits business or for other purposes. The Staff focuses now on the fact thatItem 10(e)(1)(i)(D) of Regulation S-K provides that a statement of additionalpurposes is required “if material” and that an issuer is to disclose additionalpurposes, “if any,” for using the measure. This reverses a prior trend in thecomment process, using this provision in Item 10(e) as one of the bases forobjecting as to whether there is a legitimate purpose for presenting the non-GAAP measure. However, the interpretation does not alter the requirement inItem 10(e)(1)(i)(C) to describe the reasons why management believes thatpresentation of the non-GAAP measure provides useful information to invest-ors regarding the issuer’s financial condition and results of operations.

103RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (116)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

• Per Share Performance Measures Permitted. Non-GAAP Financial MeasuresCompliance and Disclosure Interpretations Question 102.05 clarifies that,while the SEC continues to prohibit per share non-GAAP liquidity measuresin any documents filed with or furnished to the SEC, the Staff will not objectto a per share non-GAAP measure used to present financial performance.

• Free Cash Flow Permitted. Non-GAAP Financial Measures Compliance andDisclosure Interpretations Question 102.07 indicates that Item 10(e) ofRegulation S-K does not prohibit the presentation in SEC filings of a “freecash flow” measure, which is usually defined as cash flow from operatingactivities less capital expenditures. The Staff’s guidance cautions that thefree cash flow measure must be accompanied by a clear description of theway in which it is calculated as well as the necessary GAAP reconciliation,and that issuers should avoid “inappropriate or potentially misleadinginferences about its usefulness,” such as implying that the amounts represent“residual cash flow.”

• Adjusted EBITDA under Financial Covenants. Non-GAAP Financial Meas-ures Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations Question 102.09 indicatesthat the prohibitions in Item 10(e) on the presentation of adjusted EBIT andEBITDA has prevented issuers from fully addressing in MD&A the financialcovenants of their credit agreements. The Staff states that, “the prohibition inItem 10(e) notwithstanding,” when management believes that the creditagreement is material and that an adjusted EBIT/EBITDA financial covenantis material to understanding the agreement and the issuer’s financial con-dition and/or liquidity, then the issuer may be required to disclose the meas-ure in the MD&A. The interpretation also provides that the disclosurearound the measure should probably also address: (1) the material terms ofthe credit agreement, including the covenant; (2) the amount or limitrequired for compliance with the covenant; and (3) the actual or reasonablylikely effects of compliance or non-compliance with the covenant on theissuer’s financial condition and liquidity.

Liquidity and Capital Resources Disclosures

Effective September 28, 2010, the Staff provided interpretive guidance intendedto improve the discussion of liquidity and funding risks in MD&A. This guidancefocuses on disclosures related to liquidity, leverage ratios and the contractual obliga-tions table. The Staff has also proposed amendments to disclosure requirements related

104RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (117)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

to short-term borrowings, but these amendments have not yet been adopted. TheSEC’s interpretive release, SEC Release No. 33-9144 (September 17, 2010), empha-sizes that issuers are required to disclose known trends or demands, commitments,events or uncertainties that will result in, or that are reasonably likely to result in, amaterial change in the issuer’s liquidity. The release highlights a number of trends anduncertainties relating to liquidity that issuers should consider including in theirMD&A, including: difficulties in accessing the debt markets; reliance on commercialpaper or other short-term financing arrangements; maturity mismatches between bor-rowing sources and the assets funded by those sources; changes in terms requested bycounterparties; changes in the valuation of collateral; and counterparty risk. Issuersshould provide disclosure of any intra-period variations if their disclosure does nototherwise adequately convey their financing arrangements. In addition, if a repurchasetransaction is reasonably likely to result in the use of a material amount of cash orother liquid assets, it may be required to be disclosed in MD&A. The SEC also sug-gests that issuers consider describing cash management and risk management policiesthat are relevant to an assessment of their financial condition.

The interpretive release also addresses the inclusion of capital and leverage ratiosin MD&A. If a capital or leverage ratio financial measure is presented, the issuershould clearly state why the measure is useful to understanding its financial conditionand the measure should be accompanied by a clear explanation of the calculationmethodology. This explanation should include a discussion of any unusual, infrequentor non-recurring inputs, or any inputs that are adjusted so that the ratio is calculateddifferently from directly comparable measures. Issuers should also consider whetherthe measure differs from other measures used in their industry; if so, additional dis-cussion may be required to ensure that the disclosure is not misleading. Any non-GAAP financial measure, including any non-GAAP capital or leverage ratio, that isdisclosed in an issuer’s filing should comply with SEC rules and guidance related tothe inclusion of non-GAAP financial measures.

In its interpretive release, the SEC recognizes that different approaches to thecontractual obligations table have developed. The SEC declines to provide specificpresentation requirements or guidance on the treatment of certain items; instead, itstates that issuers should provide a presentation that is clear, understandable and notmisleading, and that appropriately reflects the obligations that are meaningful to theissuer. The format and content of the disclosure should support the purpose of the dis-closure in this section, which is to provide aggregated information about contractualobligations in a single location in order to improve transparency of an issuer’s liquidity

105RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (118)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

and capital resource needs, and to provide context for assessing the role of off-balancesheet arrangements. Issuers should use footnotes, in the SEC’s view, to provideinformation necessary for an understanding of the timing and amount of specifiedcontractual obligations. Additional narrative disclosure should be provided if neces-sary to explain what the table does and does not include and to promote understandingof the information provided in the table.

Cybersecurity Disclosure

On October 13, 2011, the SEC’s Division of Corporation Finance issued dis-closure guidance to assist publicly-traded companies “in assessing what, if any, dis-closures should be provided about cybersecurity matters in light of each registrant’sspecific facts and circ*mstances.” CF Disclosure Guidance Topic No. 2 reviews theapplicability of existing SEC disclosure requirements to today’s cybersecurity con-cerns, noting that: (i) businesses increasingly focus or rely on internet communicationsand remote data storage; (ii) risks and potential costs associated with cyber attacks andinadequate cyber security are increasing; and (iii) as with other operational and finan-cial risks and events, companies should on an ongoing basis review the adequacy ofdisclosure relating to cybersecurity risks and other cyber incidents. The Staff furthernotes that the guidance is meant to be consistent with disclosure considerations for anybusiness risk, and that any disclosure should not compromise cybersecurity efforts.The Staff highlights a number of critical considerations, including: (i) potential costsand other negative consequences, such as increased protection costs (e.g., additionalpersonnel, training, third party consultants), remediation costs, liability for stolenassets or information, the repair of damaged systems and incentives for customers tomaintain business relationship after cyber attack; (ii) lost revenues arising from theunauthorized use of proprietary information, and the failure to retain or attract custom-ers; (iii) litigation; and (iv) reputational damage.

Specifically with respect to risk factors disclosures, the Staff notes that issuers shouldconsider the probability that cyber incidents will occur in the future, and the potential costsand other consequences that could result. In this regard, issuers must evaluate prior cyberincidents, including the severity and frequency of such incidents, as well as the probabilityof cyber attacks occurring. To the extent material, risk factor disclosure of potential cyberincidents may be necessary and may include aspects of a company’s operations that giverise to or mitigate these cyber risks. The Staff indicates that issuers should not disclose“boilerplate” risks that generally apply to all public companies, and should not discloseany information in a risk factor that would increase a company’s cybersecurity risks.

106RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (119)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

With regard to disclosures in MD&A, the Staff indicates that issuers shouldaddress cybersecurity risks or incidents if the costs or other impact of a known cyberrisk or incident represents a material event, trend or uncertainty that is reasonablylikely to have a material effect on the company’s results of operations, financial con-dition or liquidity. MD&A disclosure may be required even if a past cyber incident didnot have a material effect on the company’s financial condition if the incident causedthe company to materially increase its cybersecurity expenditures.

As for business disclosures, the Staff indicates that issuers should evaluate theimpact of cyber incidents or cybersecurity risks on each reportable business segment,and if a cyber incident or cybersecurity risk materially impacts a company’s (or busi-ness segment’s) relationships with customers or suppliers, or materially impacts thecompetitive landscape, a company should summarize the cyber risk or incident and itsimpact in the description of that company’s business. In the context of legal proceed-ings disclosure, issuers should discuss any material pending legal proceeding related toa cyber incident to which a company is a party.

The Staff notes that with regard to disclosure controls and procedures, issuersshould evaluate the extent to which cyber incidents pose a risk to the company’s abil-ity to record, process, summarize and report information that is required to be dis-closed in SEC filings. If it is reasonably possible that information would not beproperly recorded, processed, summarized or reported due to a cyber incident, issuersmust evaluate how cybersecurity risks impact the company’s disclosure controls andprocedures, whether these controls and procedures are effective and whether anyremedial measures are required.

With respect to an issuer’s financial statement disclosures, issuers shouldconsider accounting principles that may be important when summarizing the impact ofa cyber incident on the company’s financial statements, including: (i) costs incurred toprevent cyber incidents; (ii) costs incurred to mitigate damages from a cyber incident;(iii) loss contingencies related to cyber incidents; (iv) impairment of certain assets; and(v) subsequent event disclosures.

Cybersecurity continues to be an area of interest for members of Congress, andthey continue to look for opportunities to mandate disclosure or escalate the SEC Staffguidance to Commission guidance. In May 2013, Senator Rockefeller (Chairman ofthe Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation) and SEC Chair Whiteexchanged letters on the topic of cybersecurity disclosure, and Chair White indicatedthat this issue continues to be a disclosure priority for the Division of Corporation

107RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (120)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

Finance. She further indicated that, at that time, the Staff had issued about fifty com-ment letters to issuers asking about their cybersecurity disclosure.

In October 2014, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce sent a letter to SEC ChairWhite requesting that the SEC not adopt regulations that would mandate specific dis-closures about cybersecurity. The Chamber was reacting to calls by those in Congresswho have encouraged the SEC to beef up its rules about cybersecurity disclosure.

The Staff’s comments on cybersecurity risk factor disclosure address a number ofareas:

• Disclosure of Cybersecurity Risks. When the Staff has found no disclosureabout cybersecurity risks, the Staff has issued a comment asking whether theissuer has considered the guidance in CF Disclosure Guidance Topic No. 2.In drafting this risk factor disclosure, issuers should address the risk thatcyber incidents may go undetected for a long period of time. Issuers alsotypically address any preventative measures that have been established forthe purpose of addressing cyber risks, and the risk that such measures maynot be effective to avoid an incident. Moreover, risk factor disclosure shouldaddress the particular risks that may arise as a result of third-party access toan issuer’s information technology systems. Risk factor disclosure aboutcybersecurity also addresses when an issuer has insurance coverage forcyber incidents, and the extent to which costs of a cyber attack could exceedthat insurance coverage. The risk factor disclosure will also typically high-light the potential consequences of a cyber attack, which could includethings like reputational harm, costs to remediate the impact of the attack, andcosts for implementing protective measures.

• Unbundling the Cybersecurity Risk. The Staff has often asked that an issuerbreak out cybersecurity risks into a separate risk factor, rather than includingthe risk in one risk factor that addresses a variety of other concerns that theissuer faces.

• Context for the Risk Factor. A frequent Staff comment has been to ask thatan issuer address in the risk factor any security breaches, cyber attacks orother cyber incidents that have been experienced in the past, even if thosewere not major breaches or did not have a material adverse impact on theissuer’s business. In the Staff’s view, this disclosure is important to anunderstanding of the extent to which an issuer faces threats.

108RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (121)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

• Post-Breach Disclosure. In general, as outlined in CF Disclosure GuidanceTopic No. 2, the Staff is looking for disclosures about the costs and con-sequences of the incident, including: (i) the scope and magnitude of thebreach; (ii) whether the incident was material; (iii) any known or potentialremediation or other costs; and (iv) preventative measures to address the riskof future incidents.

Issuers should also consider the extent to which investors will be looking for thecybersecurity topic to be addressed in the proxy statement. Proxy advisor recom-mendations against directors of issuers who experienced cyber attacks have focusedattention on cybersecurity as a governance issue, as investors consider what role theboard should play in overseeing an issuer’s cybersecurity program. Issuers are increas-ingly disclosing in their proxy statements the extent to which the board and itscommittees oversee cybersecurity risks, particularly in the context of those issuers whohave experienced a significant cyber incident.

Guidance on European Debt Exposures

On January 6, 2012, the SEC’s Division of Corporation Finance issued guidanceregarding disclosures about exposure to the debt of sovereign and non-sovereignissuers in Europe. Topic No. 4 of the SEC Staff’s new “CF Disclosure Guidance” ser-ies addresses specific concerns about the adequacy of public disclosures made princi-pally by financial institutions regarding their European debt exposures, and thepotential consequences of such exposures on those issuers. The Staff encouragesaffected issuers to consider this guidance in preparing their SEC reports, including inthe upcoming annual reports for calendar year-end issuers.

The Staff has focused its attention on disclosure about European debt exposureincluded (or required to be included) in risk factors, MD&A, qualitative and quantita-tive disclosure about market risks (“Market Risk Disclosure”), as well as IndustryGuide 3 disclosures required of bank holding companies and similar lending anddeposit-taking financial institutions (“Guide 3”). The Staff’s guidance in Topic No. 4is directed at both U.S. and non-U.S. financial institutions, and the Staff notes that, todate, disclosures about the nature and extent of direct or indirect exposure to Europeansovereign debt “have been inconsistent in both substance and presentation.” For thisreason, the Staff lays out a very specific structure for evaluating what disclosures maybe necessary regarding the exposures, based on the Staff’s own experience incommenting on those disclosures that it has, to date, found to be lacking.

109RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (122)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

In providing its guidance, the Staff has not specifically identified the countries inEurope that are of principal concern, noting the specific countries may change overtime. However, the Staff does indicate that issuers should focus on those countriesexperiencing “significant economic, fiscal and/or political strains such that the like-lihood of default would be higher than would be anticipated when such factors do notexist.” The Staff encourages issuers to identify the basis for determining which coun-tries are included in the disclosure.

In comments issued by the Staff in its review of periodic reports filed in 2011,enhanced disclosure was requested, separately by country, as to: (i) gross sovereign,financial institutions, and non-financial corporations’ exposure; (ii) quantified dis-closure explaining how gross exposures are hedged; and (iii) a discussion of the cir-c*mstances under which losses may not be covered by purchased credit protection.

In addition to providing the disclosure separately by country as indicated above,the Staff has requested that issuers segregate between sovereign debt and non-sovereign debt exposures, and by financial statement category, in order to arrive at thegross funded exposure. In addition, the Staff has asked that issuers consider separatelyproviding disclosure of gross unfunded commitments made. Further, the Staff suggeststhat information regarding hedges be provided in order to present an amount of netfunded exposure. As discussed below, the Staff has provided a wide-ranging outlinefor assessing what qualitative and quantitative disclosures may be necessary regardingdirect or indirect exposures to the European debt crisis.

The Staff believes that the disclosures outlined in Topic No. 4 are called for underexisting, principles-based disclosure requirements. In this regard, the Staff notes thefollowing applicable disclosure requirements and how they should be interpreted whenevaluating what disclosure is necessary regarding European debt exposures:

• MD&A. Issuers must identify know trends or known demands, commitments,events or uncertainties that will result, or that are reasonably likely to result, ina material increase or decrease in liquidity, and issuers must also discuss anyknown trends or uncertainties that have had, or that the issuer reasonablyexpects may have, a material favorable or unfavorable impact on income.

• Guide 3. Item III.C.3 of Guide 3 calls for issuers to identify cross-borderoutstandings to borrowers in each foreign country where the exposuresexceed one percent of total assets, as well as disclosure where “current con-ditions in a foreign country give rise to liquidity problems which are

110RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (123)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

expected to have a material impact on the timely repayment of principal orinterest on the country’s private or public sector debt,” including tabulardisclosure of changes in outstandings, and in some situations tabular dis-closure of restructured outstandings.

• Risk Factors and Market Risk Disclosure. Issuers must provide disclosure ofmaterial risks, including in risk factors disclosure and in specific MarketRisk Disclosures, and the Staff indicates that such disclosures should not begeneric “boilerplate” and should rather be tailored to the issuer’s specificfacts and circ*mstances.

In Topic No. 4, the Staff provides a highly detailed outline for preparing the typesof disclosure called for by the guidance. This outline provides considerations to beused when determining, in light of an issuer’s specific facts, what disclosure should beprovided in a manner that is consistent with the guidance. The outline is as follows:

I. Gross Funded Exposure

a. Countries

i. The basis for the countries selected for disclosure.

ii. The basis for determining the domicile of the exposure.

b. Type of Counterparty

i. Separate categories of exposure to sovereign and non-sovereigncounterparties.

1. Sovereign exposures consist of financial instruments enteredinto with sovereign and local governments.

2. Non-sovereign exposures comprise exposure to corporationsand financial institutions. To the extent material, separate dis-closure may be required between financial and non-financialinstitutions.

c. Categories of Financial Instruments

i. Categories to be considered for disclosure include loans and leases,held-to-maturity securities, available-for-sale securities, trading secu-rities, derivatives, and other financial exposures to arrive at gross-funded exposure.

111RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (124)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

1. For loans and leases, the gross amount prior to the deduction ofthe impairment provision and the net amount after the impair-ment provision.

2. For held-to-maturity securities, the amortized cost basis and thefair value.

3. For available-for-sale securities, the fair value, and if material,the amortized cost basis.

4. For trading securities, the fair value.

5. For derivative assets, the fair value, except that amount could beoffset by the amount of cash collateral applied if separate foot-note disclosure quantifying the amount of the offset is provided.

6. For credit default contracts sold, the fair value and the notionalvalue of protection sold, along with a description of the eventsthat would trigger payout under the contracts.

7. For other financial exposures, to the extent carried at fair value,the fair value. To the extent carried at amortized cost, the grossamount prior to the deduction of impairment and the net amountafter impairment.

II. Unfunded Exposure

a. The amount of unfunded commitments by type of counterparty and by coun-try.

b. The key terms and any potential limitations of the counterparty being able todraw down on the facilities.

III. Total Gross Exposure (Funded and Unfunded)

a. The effect of gross funded exposure and total unfunded exposure should besubtotaled to arrive at total gross exposure as of the balance sheet date, sepa-rated between type of counterparty and by country.

b. Appropriate footnote disclosure may be provided highlighting additional keydetails, such as maturity information for the exposures.

112RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (125)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

IV. Effects of Credit Default Protection to Arrive at Net Exposures.

a. The effects of credit default protection purchased separately by counterpartyor country.

b. The fair value and notional value of the purchased credit protection.

c. The nature of payout or trigger events under the purchased credit protectioncontracts.

d. The types of counterparties that the credit protection was purchased fromand an indication of the counterparty’s credit quality.

e. Whether credit protection purchased has a shorter maturity date than thebonds or other exposure against which the protection was purchased. If thecredit protection has a shorter maturity date, clarifying disclosure should beprovided about this fact, as well as the risks presented by the mismatch ofthe maturity.

V. Other Risk Management Disclosures

a. How management is monitoring and/or mitigating exposures to selectedcountries, including any stress testing that is being performed.

b. How management is monitoring and/or mitigating the effects of indirectexposure in the analysis of risk. Disclosure should explain how the issueridentifies their indirect exposures, provide examples of the identifiedexposures, along with the level of the indirect exposures.

c. Current developments (rating downgrades, financial relief plans forimpacted countries, widening credit spreads, etc.) of the identified countries,how those developments, or changes to them, could impact the issuer’sfinancial condition, results of operations, liquidity or capital resources.

VI. Post-Reporting Date Events

a. Significant developments since the reporting date and the effects of thoseevents on the reported amounts.

As noted in the “Supplementary Information” section of Topic No. 4, the state-ments in the CF Disclosure Guidance represent views of the Staff, and do not con-stitute a new rule, regulation or statement of the SEC. Nonetheless, financial

113RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (126)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

institutions preparing disclosure for their SEC reports should carefully consider thedisclosure that should be provided in response to the Staff’s expectations, as the Staff’soutline included in Topic No. 4 will likely serve as a roadmap for the type of com-ments that the Staff will issue when reviewing the annual reports of any issuers withEuropean credit exposure in 2012. While the Staff has not sought to provide a “one-size-fits-all” approach for these disclosures, Topic No. 4 does seek to provide keyprinciples that need to be considered when evaluating and describing European debtexposures in upcoming SEC reports.

Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012

The Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012 (the “ITR Act”),was enacted on August 10, 2012. This law added Exchange Act Section 13(r), requir-ing disclosure by issuers and the filing of a notice with the SEC. If an issuer or any ofits affiliates have engaged in any of the activities referenced in Section 13(r), the issu-er’s periodic reports must include disclosure of: (i) the nature and extent of the activ-ity; (ii) the gross revenues and net profits, if any, attributable to the activity; and(iii) whether the issuer or affiliate intends to continue to engage in the activity. If anissuer or an affiliate of the issuer has knowingly engaged in any of the subject activ-ities, then, in addition to the required disclosure, the issuer must submit a publicly-available notice to the SEC under the new EDGAR form type “IRANNOTICE.” TheSEC must send the notice to the President and certain Congressional committees.

The activities referenced in Section 13(r) focus in particular on transactions andinvestments relating to the petrochemical, petroleum and marine transport industries,activities relating to weapons of mass destruction and other military capabilities,financial and other transactions with those whose assets are frozen and certain speci-fied Iranian entities, activities relating to the transfer of goods, technologies or serviceslikely to be used by the government of Iran (as defined in U.S. sanctions laws) tocommit human rights abuses, and any transactions or dealings with the government ofIran without the specific authorization of a Federal department or agency.

Section 13(r) did not require any SEC rulemaking. On December 4, 2012, theStaff of the SEC’s Division of Corporation Finance updated its Exchange Act SectionsCompliance and Disclosure Interpretations to include seven interpretations thataddress the implementation of Section 13(r).

The Staff notes in Exchange Act Sections Compliance and Disclosure Inter-pretations Question 147.01 that if a periodic report is due after February 6, 2013 but

114RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (127)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

the issuer chooses to file the report prior to that date, the issuer is still subject to theSection 13(r) disclosure requirements for that report, and, as noted in Exchange ActSections Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations Question 147.02, the disclosuremust cover activities that took place over the entire fiscal year (e.g., January 1 throughDecember 31, 2012), even if those activities pre-dated the August 10, 2012 enactmentdate of Section 13(r).

In the event an issuer has not identified any reportable activities during the rele-vant period, the Staff indicates in Exchange Act Sections Compliance and DisclosureInterpretations Question 147.04 that an issuer is not required to include disclosure inits periodic reports. Disclosure is only required if any of the covered activitiesoccurred during the reporting period.

One of the requirements of Exchange Act Section 13(r) is that issuers must dis-close any dealings by the issuer or its affiliates with the government of Iran, even ifthose activities are not sanctionable, unless the activity is conducted under a specificauthorization from a U.S. federal government department or agency. The Staff statedin Exchange Act Sections Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations Question 147.05that this exception is only available when the activity was authorized by a U.S.government agency or department, not an equivalent foreign governmental authority.Both general and specific licenses from the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC)for transactions can qualify, so long as all of the conditions of the license are strictlyobserved, as noted in Exchange Act Sections Compliance and Disclosure Inter-pretations Question 147.06.

In Exchange Act Sections Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations Question147.07, the Staff notes that the disclosure made under Section 13(r) is public whenfiled with the SEC, and the notice of the disclosure that is filed on EDGAR would alsobe publicly available upon filing (as noted in the SEC’s notice regarding the newEDGAR form type). The SEC has not prescribed the form of the notice, other than tosay that notice should be a separate document that includes the information requiredby Section 13(r).

The Staff stated in Exchange Act Sections Compliance and Disclosure Inter-pretations Question 147.03 that Section 13(r) applies to both the issuer and its affili-ates, and for this purpose “affiliate” has the same meaning as in 1934 Act Rule 12b-2.Rule 12b-2’s definition of affiliate is typically read to include directors and officers,therefore issuers must determine whether any such persons have engaged in the activ-ities regarding Iran that are specified in Section 13(r). While no consensus has

115RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (128)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

emerged as to whether specific questions about Iran activities should be included inthe D&O questionnaire, some issuers have included questions with varying degrees ofdetail regarding this disclosure item.

Unbundling

Litigation by shareholder activists alleging violations of the SEC’s rules whichconcern the “unbundling” of separate matters that are submitted to a shareholder voteby an issuer or any other person soliciting proxy authority has focused attention on thepresentation of matters in the proxy statement. Exchange Act Rule 14a-4(a)(3) requiresthat the form of proxy “identify clearly and impartially each separate matter intendedto be acted upon, whether or not related to or conditioned on the approval of othermatters.” Rule 14a-4(b)(1) further requires that the form of proxy provide separateboxes for shareholders to choose between approval, disapproval or abstention “withrespect to each separate matter referred to therein as intended to be acted upon.” Theserules are intended to provide a means for shareholders to communicate their views tothe board of directors on each matter to be acted upon. In Exchange Act Rule 14a-4(a)(3) Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations published on January 24, 2014, theSEC Staff addressed a number of specific proposals and whether the matters con-templated by those proposals must be unbundled under Rule 14a-4(a)(3).

In Exchange Act Rule 14a-4(a)(3) Compliance and Disclosure InterpretationsQuestion 101.01, the Staff addresses a situation where management of an issuer hasnegotiated concessions from holders of a series of its preferred stock to reduce the divi-dend rate on the preferred stock in exchange for an extension of the maturity date. TheStaff indicates that a single proposal submitted by management to holders of the issuer’scommon stock to approve a charter amendment containing these modifications need notbe unbundled into separate proposals under Rule 14a-4(a)(3) (i.e., one relating to thereduction of the dividend rate, and another relating to the extension of the maturity date).In this regard, the Staff notes that multiple matters that are so “inextricably intertwined”as to effectively constitute a single matter need not be unbundled. The Staff would viewthe matters relating to the terms of the preferred stock as being inextricably intertwined,“because each of the proposed provisions relates to a basic financial term of the sameseries of capital stock and was the sole consideration for the countervailing provision.”The Staff notes, however, that it would not view two separate matters as being inex-tricably intertwined “merely because the matters were negotiated as part of a transactionwith a third party, nor because the matters represent terms of a contract that one or theother of the parties considers essential to the overall bargain.”

116RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (129)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

In Exchange Act Rule 14a-4(a)(3) Compliance and Disclosure InterpretationsQuestion 101.02, the Staff addresses a situation where management of an issuerintends to present an amended and restated charter to shareholders for approval at anannual meeting, with proposed amendments that would change the par value of thecommon stock, eliminate provisions relating to a series of preferred stock that is nolonger outstanding and is not subject to further issuance, and declassify the board ofdirectors. The Staff indicated that under Rule 14a-4(a)(3), these individual amend-ments that are part of the restatement would not need to be unbundled into separateproposals. In this regard, the Staff notes that it would not ordinarily object to the bun-dling of any number of immaterial matters with a single material matter. The Staffindicates that while there is no bright-line test for determining materiality in the con-text of Rule 14a-4(a)(3), issuers should consider whether a given matter substantivelyaffects shareholder rights. Therefore, in this particular example, while the declas-sification amendment would be material given its impact on shareholder rights, theamendments relating to par value and preferred stock do not substantively affectshareholder rights, and therefore both of these amendments ordinarily could beincluded in a single restatement proposal together with the declassification amend-ment. The Staff notes, however, that “if management knows or has reason to believethat a particular amendment that does not substantively affect shareholder rights never-theless is one on which shareholders could reasonably be expected to wish to express aview separate from their views on the other amendments that are part of the restate-ment, the amendment should be unbundled.” Further, the Staff notes that the analysisunder Rule 14a-4(a)(3) is not governed by the fact that, for state law purposes, theseamendments could be presented to shareholders as a single restatement proposal.

In Exchange Act Rule 14a-4(a)(3) Compliance and Disclosure InterpretationsQuestion 101.03, the Staff addresses a single proposal covering an omnibus amend-ment to a registrant’s equity incentive plan. The Staff indicated that the separatechanges need not be unbundled into separate proposals, when those changes included:(i) an increase to the total number of shares reserved for issuance under the plan;(ii) an increase in the maximum amount of compensation payable to an employeeduring a specified period for purposes of meeting the requirements for qualifiedperformance-based compensation under Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code;(iii) the addition of restricted stock to the types of awards that can be granted under theplan; and (iv) an extension of the term of the plan. The Staff notes that while it gen-erally will object to the bundling of multiple, material matters into a single proposal –provided that the individual matters would require shareholder approval under state

117RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (130)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

law, the rules of a national securities exchange, or the registrant’s organizationaldocuments if presented on a standalone basis – the Staff will not object to the pre-sentation of multiple changes to an equity incentive plan in a single proposal. See Sec-tion III of SEC Release No. 34-33229 (November 22, 1993). The Staff notes that thisis the case even if the changes can be characterized as material in the context of theplan and the rules of a national securities exchange would require shareholder approvalof each of the changes if presented on a standalone basis.

The Staff of the Division of Corporation Finance recently published revised guid-ance regarding the “unbundling” of matters presented for shareholder votes in con-nection with mergers and acquisitions. The guidance is contained in new ExchangeAct Rule 14a-4(a)(3) Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations Questions 201.01 and201.02, which replace unbundling interpretations that the Staff issued in 2004.

Under the revised guidance, if the acquiring company is required to present aproposed amendment to its organizational documents separately on its form of proxyfor shareholder approval, then a target company subject to the SEC’s proxy rules alsomust present this proposed amendment separately on the form of its proxy for approvalby its own shareholders. This vote is required even if a separate vote is not requiredunder state law or if the proposed amendment is the only matter that the acquiringcompany is submitting for a shareholder vote. In the Staff’s view, unbundling isrequired because the proposed amendment is a term of the transaction and wouldeffect a material change to the equity securities that the target company’s shareholdersare receiving in the transaction. As a result, these shareholders should be allowed toexpress their separate views on changes that would establish their substantive share-holder rights. The Staff indicated that only material matters must be unbundled,including amendments to a classified or staggered board, limitations on the removal ofdirectors and supermajority voting provisions. Matters that the Staff would view asimmaterial (and thus would not require unbundling) include changes to the company’sname, restatements of charters and technical changes. A target company also is notrequired to separately present a proposed amendment to increase the number ofauthorized shares of the acquiring company’s equity securities as long as the increaseis limited to the number of shares reasonably expected to be issued in the transaction.Companies are permitted to condition the completion of a transaction on shareholderapproval of any separate proposals. In this case, the company must clearly disclosesuch conditions in the proxy materials submitted to shareholders.

118RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (131)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

The revised unbundling guidance also applies to transactions in which the partiesform a new entity to act as an acquisition vehicle and issue equity securities in thetransaction. Under these circ*mstances, the party whose shareholders are expected toown the largest percentage of equity securities of the acquisition entity following thecompletion of the transaction would be considered the acquiring company for purposesof the unbundling analysis. The acquiring company must separately submit for share-holder approval any material provision of the acquisition entity’s organizationaldocuments if: (1) those provisions are material changes from the acquiring company’sorganizational documents; and (2) the changes would require approval of the acquiringcompany’s shareholders. This position does not apply in the context of provisions thatare required by the law of the governing jurisdiction of the acquisition entity. If theacquiring company must present separately any provision of the acquisition entity’sorganizational documents for approval by its shareholders (or would be required to doso if it were conducting a solicitation subject to the proxy rules), then the target com-pany must also present such provisions separately for its shareholders.

CHANGES TO THE SEC’S REVIEW PROGRAM

In 2010, the SEC announced a restructuring of the Division of Corporate Financethat created three new offices, including an office for large and significant financialservices companies. Although most public companies were not subject to review bythat office, it is important to note that the office employed a “continuous review”approach that the Division of Corporation Finance has been developing over the pastfew years. In 2015, this office was combined with the office responsible for reviewingthe filings of financial institutions.

The shift towards continuous review by the Staff is also evident in another recenttrend. Some issuers have received follow-up letters on their proxy statements, eventhough the Staff had already completed its review of the issuer’s Form 10-K before theproxy statement was filed. If a continuous review model is adopted more broadly bythe Staff, it could result in issuers spending more time responding to Staff comments.

In addition to the shift towards continuous review, the Staff has indicated that itwill begin reviewing documents outside of an issuer’s filings. This has been madeclear in the updates to the Staff’s statements in connection with the non-GAAP meas-ures guidance discussed above. The Staff has expressed concern that issuers’ SEC fil-ings seem to have become “compliance” documents, rather than communicative toolsthat provide useful information to shareholders, and has suggested that it will lookoutside of an issuer’s filings in its review of the issuer’s risk factors and MD&A. The

119RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (132)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

Staff has stated that it will focus on ensuring that the story an issuer is telling in itsSEC filings is consistent with the story being told elsewhere, including in earningsreleases, presentations, statements, news coverage and analyst reports. As a result,issuers are now more likely to see comments that reference disclosure made in otherforums that raise questions or issues about the disclosures in filings.

In 2012, the Division of Corporation Finance announced the establishment of anOffice of Disclosure Standards. The stated responsibilities of this office include evalu-ating the outcomes of the Division’s selective review of various materials filed underthe federal securities laws, with a view towards enhancing the standards and policiesfor those reviews to enhance their effectiveness and efficiency, and conductingongoing program assessments to evaluate the effectiveness of the internal supervisorycontrols, and to ensure the Division’s filing reviews are consistently performed withprofessional competence and integrity.

AUDIT COMMITTEE DISCLOSURE

There is an increasing focus on the role played by the audit committee of theboard of directors and the audit committee-auditor relationship. In October 2014, SECChair White announced an ongoing SEC effort to address a variety of issues raisedabout, e.g., the role that audit committees play and the information that issuers provideabout their audit committee’s efforts. In addition, the Investor Advisory Group of thePCAOB issued a report requesting that the PCAOB and SEC consider requiring thatthe audit committee report on its role, as well as considering whether auditors oranother third party should assess and report on the duties and operational effectivenessof the audit committee. In 2013 a consortium of audit and governance groups (e.g., theCenter for Audit Quality, Corporate Board Member, and the NACD), calling itself the“Audit Committee Collaboration,” published a report entitled “Enhancing the AuditCommittee Report: A Call to Action.” In December 2014, the Center for Audit Qualityand Audit Analytics launched the “Audit Committee Transparency Barometer,” whichpresented the results of an analysis of 2014 proxy statement disclosures about auditcommittees and auditors.

The Call to Action report noted that increased transparency through enhancedaudit committee reporting about the audit committee’s role and responsibilities was ameans for increasing investor confidence in the work of the audit committee. Thatreport cited instances where issuers had included expanded disclosure about the auditcommittee function and the audit committee’s oversight of the auditor in 2013 proxy

120RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (133)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

statement disclosures. The report indicated that issuers could follow those examples toprovide voluntary disclosures that

• clarify the scope of the audit committee’s duties;

• clearly define the audit committee’s composition; and

• provide information about: (1) factors considered when selecting orreappointing an audit firm; (2) selection of the lead audit engagement part-ner; (3) factors considered when determining auditor compensation; (4) howthe committee oversees the auditor; and (5) the evaluation of the auditor.

Issuers must carefully consider whether and how to present any voluntary addi-tional disclosures called for by these initiatives, particularly given current investorexpectations and concerns about effective governance.

On July 1, 2015, the SEC issued SEC Release No. 33-9862 (July 1, 2015), AuditCommittee Oversight, which solicits comment regarding potential disclosures about anumber of areas relating to the audit committee’s relationship with the auditor. TheSEC is considering whether a number of new disclosure requirements should addressthe level of oversight that the audit committee exercises over the auditor. The SECstates that this disclosure would provide insight into the quality of oversight, whichcould potentially allow investors to understand the potential differences in perform-ance or quality of financial reporting among issuers. The areas for which the SECseeks input include:

• Communications with the Auditor. The SEC seeks comment on whetherdisclosure might include some discussion of the audit committee’s consid-eration of communications that are required of auditors under applicableauditing standards, such as: (1) communications regarding the auditors over-all audit strategy, timing and significant risks identified; (2) the nature andextent of specialized skills used in the audit; (3) the use of other firms orother persons, including internal audit; (4) the basis for determining that theauditor is able to serve as the issuer’s principal auditor; and (5) the results ofthe audit.

• Auditor/Audit Committee Meetings. The SEC seeks comment on whether itshould expand currently required disclosure about the frequency of auditcommittee meetings to include additional disclosure about the frequency of

121RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (134)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

private meetings or topics discussed with the auditor which could serve toprovide additional insight about the audit committee’s oversight of the auditor.

• Audit Quality Considerations. Comments are solicited regarding additionalrequired disclosure, which could include a description of the nature of any dis-cussions held with the auditor regarding the results of the audit firm’s internalquality review, as well as the PCAOB’s most recent inspection. This disclosurecould address whether the audit committee discussed with the auditor theinspection report matters that are set forth in PCAOB Rel. No. 2012-003,Information for Audit Committees about the PCAOB Inspection Process (2012).

• Assessing and Selecting the Auditor. The SEC seeks comment on whetherdisclosure should be provided regarding the steps that the audit committeetook in its process for assessment of the auditor, and the specific elements ofthe criteria considered by the committee.

• Consideration of Proposals. If an issuer has gone through a request for pro-posal process, the SEC seeks comment on whether the disclosure shouldinclude a discussion of the number of auditors asked to make proposals, howthey were selected and the information that was used by the audit committeein making its decision.

• Ratification of Auditor Selection. The SEC indicates that the disclosureprovided regarding a ratification of auditor proposal should “provide usefulinformation to shareholders as to how and why the board is seeking rat-ification of the auditor, as well as the implication of the shareholder votebeing solicited.”

• Disclosure about the Audit Engagement Team. The concept release seeksinput on whether disclosure should be provided regarding the audit engage-ment team, including the name of the engagement partner, as well as poten-tially the names of the other key members of the engagement team. Inaddition, the disclosure might include information about how long theindividuals have served in their respective roles, as well as their relevantexperience (e.g., the number of prior audit engagements performed andwhether they were in the same industry).

• Audit Partner Selection. The SEC indicates that disclosure could be providedregarding the involvement of the audit committee in the selection of the

122RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (135)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

audit engagement partner. It is believed that any input the audit committeehas in this selection could provide “transparency and insight into theexercise of the audit committee’s responsibilities in overseeing the auditor.”

• Auditor Tenure. The concept release solicits comment on whether auditortenure disclosure should be required. The SEC indicates that disclosure ofthis information “could provide insight into the audit committee’s overalldecision to engage or retain the auditor.”

• Involvement of Other Firms. The SEC seeks comment on whether disclosureshould address the names, locations and responsibilities of accounting firmsaffiliated with the auditor, as well as non-affiliated accounting firms andother third party participants involved in the audit (such as actuaries, taxadvisors, consultants).

The concept release also seeks comment as to whether disclosure of this typeshould remain voluntary, where the disclosure should appear, and whether additionaldisclosures should be required of all issuers. The release also seeks comment on whetheraudit committees should be required to report on other areas of oversight, such as riskgovernance, whistleblower complaints, cyber risk, or information technology risk.

DIRECTOR ELECTION VOTING STANDARD DISCLOSURE

The Staff of the Division of Corporation Finance has recently observed thatissuers should review the disclosure in their proxy statements about the voting stan-dard for director elections. The Staff’s focus on the issue was prompted by a rule-making petition filed by the Council of Institutional Investors (“CII”), which requestedthat the SEC require companies to clarify the voting standards for the election of direc-tors because, in CII’s view, issuers that use the state law default plurality rule, coupledwith a policy that requires the director to submit a resignation if the director does notreceive a majority of votes in favor, should not be permitted to state that their directorsare elected by majority voting standards. The United Brotherhood of Carpenters pre-viously submitted a supplement to a petition filed in 2011 which addressed a similarproblem. The SEC Staff in the Division of Economic and Risk Analysis found numer-ous examples where companies which described their director election voting stan-dards in a confusing manner, such as by referring to a “plurality-plus” voting standardas “majority voting” for director elections.

123RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (136)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

SEC ENFORCEMENT ACTIONS

On September 10, 2014, the SEC announced settlements with officers, directors, andsignificant shareholders for violating federal securities laws requiring information abouttheir transactions in issuer stock. In addition, issuers settled charges with the SEC for con-tributing to filing failures by insiders and failing to report their insiders’ filing delin-quencies. Notable for its departure from the SEC’s previous practice of generally bringingsuch charges only in cases in which insiders were also being charged with other violations,these actions signal increased attention by the SEC on the compliance obligations ofinsiders and large shareholders of reporting issuers.

Settlements by Insiders

The SEC charged insiders with violations of the federal securities laws, specifi-cally violations of Sections 16(a), 13(d) and 13(g) of the Exchange Act. The SEC’scases naming insiders included cease-and-desist proceedings against officers, direc-tors, and major shareholders. Such officers included CEOs, CFOs, Presidents, GeneralCounsels, and Vice Presidents. Major shareholders charged were individuals, regis-tered investment advisors, and entities providing investment management services toinvestment vehicles. The charges against these insiders revealed significant delin-quencies in terms of filing the required Forms 4, Forms 5, Schedules 13D, Schedules13G, or applicable amendments.

The details of each case and the degree of non-compliance with the beneficialownership reporting requirements varied significantly. For example, insiders werecharged with the untimely filing of between nine and 70 Forms 4 and 5, with an aver-age number of 30 untimely filings. Regarding the degree of untimeliness, Forms 4were generally filed approximately six months late in the cases brought by the SEC,but some forms were filed up to four years late. Late-reported transactions hadaggregate market values of between $1 million and $182 million. The SEC proceed-ings also addressed several instances in which beneficial owners failed to file requiredamendments to Schedules 13D and 13G disclosing changes in beneficial ownership.

For corporate insiders settling these violations with the SEC, monetary penaltiesranged from $25,000 to $120,000, with the average penalty being just over $72,000among the 28 insiders. Larger penalties—ranging from $60,000 and up—were asso-ciated with a greater number of missing reports (for example, 25 untimely beneficialownership reports being filed) and/or extreme untimeliness in filing (for example, fil-ing a required report three years late).

124RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (137)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

Officers and directors charged with violations of Sections 16(a), 13(d), and 13(g)of the Exchange Act by the SEC often claimed that the violations were the result of thefailure of their publicly-traded issuer employer to file beneficial ownership reports andrequired amendments on their behalf. In turn, their publicly-traded issuer employeroften blamed such violations on lack of internal staffing or the late receipt of necessaryinformation from the corporate insider. The major shareholders charged by the SECindicated that the violations were the result of the failure of outside counsel to cor-rectly advise them on their reporting obligations.

When such defenses were brought by corporate insiders, the SEC noted in thecease-and-desist orders that reliance on an employer, outside personnel, or counsel tomake the required beneficial ownership filings or provide correct advice does notexcuse the charged violations, as an insider retains legal responsibility for compliancewith the filing requirements.

Such defenses proved unpersuasive to the SEC and ultimately unsuccessful to thecharged insiders because there is no state of mind requirement for violations of Sec-tions 16(a) and 13(d) and the rules thereunder. The failure to timely file a requiredreport, even if inadvertent, constitutes a violation.

Settlements by Issuers

In a series of settlements, the SEC issued cease-and-desist orders against, andcollected fines from, issuers for misstatements in, and failures to include, the requiredItem 405 disclosures. The misstatements and omissions were violations of Sec-tion 13(a) of the Exchange Act and Rule 13a-1 thereunder. In each matter, the SECnoted that the issuer “was required to review the forms filed and identify by name eachsuch insider who failed to file on a timely basis and set forth the number of late reportsand the number of transactions that were not reported on a timely basis.” Further, theSEC listed the annual disclosures by each issuer and then stated the facts whichshowed the inaccuracy of those disclosures. For example, the settlements noted thefollowing improper disclosures in response to Item 405:

• “Based solely upon a review of such reports and amendments thereto fur-nished to us and upon written representations of certain of such personsregarding their ownership of Common Stock, we believe that no personfailed to file any such report on a timely basis during 2010, except thatwithin the required two business day reporting requirement imposed by theSEC, the Company did not timely file one Form 4 report for [Section 16

125RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (138)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

Officer] with respect to the sale of 55 shares for which he has indirect benefi-cial ownership.” The SEC noted that, during the fiscal years described in thedisclosure, all of the company’s officers and directors filed untimely Forms4.

• “Based solely on a review of Forms 3, 4, and 5 and amendments theretofurnished to us, we know of no failure in Section 16(a) beneficial ownershipreporting compliance except that through inadvertence certain directors orexecutives filed late.” The SEC noted that, during each of the fiscal yearsdescribed in the disclosure, there were multiple failures by insiders to filereports on a timely basis.

• “During the fiscal year ended December 31, 201[X], our Directors, execu-tive officers and holders of more than ten percent of our common stockcomplied with all applicable Section 16(a) filing requirements.” The SECnoted that, during each of the fiscal years described in the disclosure, therewere multiple failures by insiders to file reports on a timely basis.

• “All Section 16(a) filing requirements applicable to its Directors, executiveofficers and greater than 10 percent beneficial owners were complied withfor the most recent fiscal year.” The SEC noted that, during each of the fiscalyears described in the disclosure, the issuer’s principal accounting officerfailed to file required Section 16(a) reports. The issuer later disclosed thatthe principal accounting officer had not filed those reports, stating that“because the Company failed to timely advise [the principal accountingofficer] that he was subject to the reporting requirements of Section 16 in hisposition as chief accounting officer.”

• “All officers, directors and 10% beneficial owners, known to the Company,had timely filed required forms reporting beneficial ownership of Companysecurities, based solely on review of Filed Forms 3 and 4 furnished to theCompany.” The SEC noted that, during each of the fiscal years described inthe disclosure, there were multiple failures by insiders to file reports on atimely basis.

In bringing actions against issuers for causing violations of Section 16(a) by theirinsiders, the SEC noted that—while it encourages issuers to assist insiders in comply-ing with Section 16(a) filing requirements—issuers that voluntarily accept certainresponsibilities and then act negligently in the performance of those tasks may be

126RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (139)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

liable for causing Section 16(a) violations by insiders. In each matter, the SEC notedthat the issuer had voluntarily agreed with its insiders to perform certain tasks in con-nection with the filing of Section 16(a) reports on their behalf, including the prepara-tion and filing of all such reports. After noting that the issuers had received therequired information in a timely manner, the SEC stated that issuer personnel respon-sible for tasks relating to the preparation and filing of Section 16(a) reports repeatedlyfailed to perform on a timely basis the tasks the company had agreed to perform. Thenumber of untimely filings ranged from 35 untimely filings over three years to 75untimely filings in a single year. The amount of the fines in these matters ranged from$75,000 to $150,000.

Fraud Settlements

The SEC’s charging of a publicly-traded issuer and corporate insiders for viola-tions of Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act in separately announced settlementsdemonstrates the SEC’s focus on these activities and the potential for fraud charges ifthese violations continue. The SEC charged a biotech issuer and its former CEO withdefrauding investors by failing to report his sales of company stock. Given the CEO’sfailure to file initial and annual beneficial ownership reports on Forms 3 and 5,respectively, the degree of untimeliness of the filing of several Forms 4 (up to 26months late), and the significant value of the late-reported sales, the SEC order foundthat the CEO’s “sales would have been viewed by a reasonable investor as sig-nificantly altering the total mix of available information given, among other things, hisposition as CEO, the frequency with which he was selling [company] stock, and thesize of his sales.” Due to his conduct, the CEO was charged with violating Sec-tion 16(a) of the Exchange Act, as well as various federal securities law provisionsrelating to committing fraud upon investors as a result of the CEO’s certification ofannual reports and signing of a proxy statement, which all included material misstate-ments regarding his compliance with Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act.

Related to the CEO’s violations of Section 16(a), the issuer was charged with fail-ing to provide the disclosures required by Item 405 of Regulation S-K in annualreports, in violation of Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act, and with various federalsecurities law provisions relating to committing fraud upon investors as a result ofsuch action.

Both the publicly-traded issuer and its former CEO settled with the SEC, andagreed to the imposition of significant monetary penalties, in the amounts of $175,000for the CEO and $375,000 for the issuer.

127RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (140)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

Key Observations

The actions undertaken by the SEC as discussed above give rise to a number ofimportant observations, as well as considerations for insiders, investors, and publiccompanies.

• Issuers almost universally assist their officers and directors with the filing ofSection 16 reports. Although the filing obligation ultimately rests with theindividuals, the SEC actions make clear that issuers who undertake to assisttheir insiders with Section 16 obligations will also be held responsible forsignificant failures in Section 16 compliance. Accordingly, issuers mustmaintain a robust compliance system reasonably designed to avoid late ormissed Section 16 filings.

• Likewise, the SEC actions make clear that insiders cannot rely solely on theirissuers or counsel for compliance with Section 16; they must understand theirreporting obligations. Periodic reminders and training are important to keepthese compliance obligations front of mind. (We also recommend that issuersprovide a short summary of the SEC’s actions to their directors and officers asenforcement actions often make good “teaching moments.”)

• It is very common for issuers to include in their Item 405 disclosure lan-guage that the disclosures are “based solely on a review of Forms 3, 4, and 5,and amendments thereto furnished to us.” It is clear from several of theactions that the issuers actually did not review the forms, or that theindividual reviewing the forms was unfamiliar with the legal requirementsunderlying them. As with other disclosures in an issuer’s periodic reports,there should be a procedure that covers this review and an appropriatelytrained individual should undertake such review.

• One of the actions included a settlement with an insider and the related pub-lic issuer that included violations of Section 17(a) of the Securities Act of1933, as amended. The SEC took the position that the insider and the issuerviolated the anti-fraud provisions of the securities laws by failing to fileSection 16(a) reports of securities transactions and holdings in a timely andaccurate manner, rendering the issuer’s annual reports and proxy statementsfalse and misleading. This settlement demonstrates the SEC’s belief that thefailure to file timely reports, and an issuer’s related materially inaccurateItem 405 disclosures, can serve as the basis of a fraud charge.

128RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (141)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

• The SEC noted the Enforcement Staff’s use of “quantitative data sources andranking algorithms” to identify late filers. The Staff has mentioned onnumerous occasions its increasing use of electronic methods to identifypotential issues. Expect to see more charges and settlements derived fromthese methods.

129RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (142)

CHAPTER 4

SHAREHOLDER ACTIVISMAND

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

130RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (143)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

SHAREHOLDER ACTIVISM AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

INTRODUCTION

Continued shareholder concerns over corporate governance and executive com-pensation issues will shape the outcome of votes in the 2016 proxy season. Issuers willneed to continue to focus on voting policies of institutional shareholders and proxyadvisory services when making corporate governance and executive compensationdecisions.

SHAREHOLDER PROPOSALS

TRENDS IN SHAREHOLDER PROPOSALS

Key trends in the 2015 proxy season for governance and executive compensationshareholder proposals were as follows:

• A continued focus on corporate governance issues, including:(i) independent chair proposals; (ii) declassification of the board of directors;and (iii) anti-takeover provisions, including the right to call a special meet-ing, super-majority voting provisions and the ability of shareholders to actby written consent;

• A reduced number of shareholder proposals on executive compensationproposals since the advent of Say-on-Pay; and

• A continuing focus on political contributions and lobbying disclosure andoversight.

Shareholder proposals in 2015 focused on:

• Proxy access shareholder proposals;

• Compensation-related proposals (i.e., pay-for-performance, clawbacks,compensation consultants, and conflicts of interest);

• Majority voting for directors (particularly at Russell 3000 companies);

• Shareholder ability to call special meetings and take action by written con-sent;

• Declassified board of directors;

131RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (144)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

• Disclosure, limits, board oversight, and shareholder approval or ratificationof political contributions; and

• Split chairman/CEO proposals.

PROXY ACCESS

Important developments with the SEC’s proxy access rule have resulted inincreased attention on proxy access shareholder proposals.

Section 971 of the Dodd-Frank Act provided the SEC with authority to promul-gate “proxy access” rules, allowing specified shareholders to include director nomi-nees in a company’s proxy materials. The Dodd-Frank Act did not prescribe specificstandards for these rules, and the SEC had in fact proposed proxy access rules prior toenactment of the Dodd-Frank Act. The SEC issued final rules facilitating shareholderdirector nominations on August 25, 2010, and such rules were scheduled to becomeeffective on November 15, 2010. However, the effectiveness of those rules was stayeddue to litigation challenging the rules.

Under Rule 14a-11 as adopted by the SEC, qualifying shareholders or groupsholding at least three percent of the voting power of a company’s securities, who hadheld their shares for at least three years, would have had the right to include directornominees in proxy materials upon meeting certain other requirements. An amendmentto Rule 14a-8 provided that companies may not exclude from their proxy materialsshareholder proposals for less restrictive proxy access procedures. However, on Sep-tember 29, 2010, the Business Roundtable and Chamber of Commerce of the UnitedStates of America filed a petition with the United States Court of Appeals for the Dis-trict of Columbia Circuit (the “Court”) seeking judicial review of the changes to theSEC’s proxy access rule, and on the same day filed with the SEC a request to stay theeffective date of Rule 14a-11. On October 4, 2010, the SEC granted the request for astay of the Rule 14a-11 and associated rules pending resolution of the petition forreview by the Court.

On July 22, 2011, the Court vacated Rule 14a-11. The Court held that the SECwas “arbitrary and capricious” in promulgating Rule 14a-11, based principally on theSEC’s failure to adequately address the economic effects of the rule. The Courtexpressed significant concerns about the conclusions that the SEC reached and theagency’s consideration of comments during the course of the rulemaking. The Courtdid not address the First Amendment challenge to the rule that had been raised by thepetitioners. On September 6, 2011, the SEC issued a statement indicating that it would

132RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (145)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

not seek rehearing of the Court’s decision, nor would it seek Supreme Court review ofthe decision; however, the SEC’s staff would continue to study the viability of a proxyaccess rule. The statement also indicated that the amendment to Rule 14a-8 referencedabove would go into effect when the Court’s mandate was finalized, which occurredon September 14, 2011. As a result, the amendments to Rule 14a-8 (along with otherrules adopted in connection with Rule 14a-11) became effective on September 20,2011, following the SEC’s publication of a notice announcing the effective date of therule changes.

The amendments to Rule 14a-8 have permitted the type of “private ordering” forproxy access through the shareholder proposal process that many commenters had sup-ported in the course of the proxy access rulemaking. Under Rule 14a-8(i)(8), asamended, a company may not exclude under this basis for exclusion a shareholder pro-posal that would amend or request that the company consider amending governingdocuments to facilitate director nominations by shareholders or disclosures related tonominations made by shareholders, as long as such proposal does not conflict with Rule14a-11 and is not otherwise excludable under some other procedural or substantive basisin Rule 14a-8. The SEC also codified some of the Staff’s historical interpretations of14a-8(i)(8) which permitted exclusion of a shareholder proposal that would: (i) seek todisqualify a nominee standing for election; (ii) remove a director from office before theexpiration of his or her term; (iii) question the competence, business judgment or charac-ter of a nominee or director; (iv) nominate a specific individual for election to the boardof directors, other than through the Rule 14a-11 process, an applicable state law provi-sion, or an issuer’s governing documents; or (v) otherwise affect the outcome of theupcoming election of directors.

While the SEC’s amendments to Rule 14a-8(i)(8) eliminated one basis to excludeproxy access shareholder proposals, there may be other options for seeking to excludeproxy access shareholder proposals. An issuer could: (i) argue that the proposal iscontrary to the proxy rules under Rule 14a-8(i)(3), i.e., the resolution contained in theproposal is inherently vague or indefinite; (ii) that by adopting its own proxy accessbylaw amendment, the shareholder’s proxy access proposal has been “substantiallyimplemented” under Rule 14a-8(i)(10); (iii) the shareholder proposal conflicts with asimilar company-sponsored proposal under Rule 14a-8(i)(9), however the Staff hasrecently issued SLB No. 14H which substantially reduced the ability to rely on thisbasis for exclusion; or (iv) other potential bases for exclusion that may be applicablebased on the wording of the proposal and supporting statement. Many companies have

133RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (146)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

been taking a “wait-and-see” approach with respect to amending their bylaws to permitproxy access in order to allow greater flexibility in responding to a future shareholderproposal, however pressure has begun to mount in 2015.

In November 2014, the Comptroller of the City of New York, on behalf of the NewYork City pension funds, launched a large-scale campaign for the 2015 proxy season tar-geting 75 issuers with a proxy access shareholder proposal. The campaign is called the“Boardroom Accountability Project.” The Comptroller’s office indicated this initiative ispart of a wider effort to implement universal proxy access through private ordering.

The New York City Comptroller indicated that the 75 Boardroom AccountabilityProject proposals were submitted to issuers that were selected based on three priorityissues: “climate change, board diversity, and excessive CEO pay.” Based on that analysis,the proposals were submitted to: (1) 33 carbon-intensive coal, oil and gas, and utilitycompanies; (2) 24 companies with few or no women directors, and little or no apparentracial or ethnic diversity; and (3) 25 companies that received significant opposition to their2014 say-on-pay votes. The 75 identical precatory proposals submitted by the Comptrollerrequested that the board of directors adopt, and present for shareholder approval, a bylawto give shareholders who meet a threshold of owning 3 percent of an issuer’s shares con-tinuously for three or more years the right to list their director candidates, representing upto 25 percent of the board, in the issuer’s proxy materials. The proposal contemplated thatthe nominating shareholder would provide notice to the issuer, within the time specified inthe bylaws, and would provide at that time the information required by the bylaws and theSEC’s rules about both the director nominee and the nominator. The proposal also con-templated that the nominating shareholder would certify that (1) it will assume liabilitystemming from any legal or regulatory violation arising out of the nominator’scommunications with the issuer’s shareholders; (2) it will comply with all applicable lawsand regulations if it uses soliciting material other than the issuer’s proxy materials; and(3) to the best of its knowledge, the required shares were acquired in the ordinary course ofbusiness and not to change or influence control of the issuer.

The proposal further provided that the nominating shareholder may submit a 500-word statement in support of the director nominee. The proposal would leave to theboard the ability to adopt procedures to deal with whether submissions are timely andadequate, as well as how to prioritize multiple nominees. The proposal’s supportingstatement was very limited, noting a 2014 CFA Institute study which concluded thatproxy access would “benefit both the markets and corporate boardrooms, with littlecost or disruption” and has the potential to raise overall US market-capitalization by

134RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (147)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

“up to $140.3 billion if adopted market-wide.” The supporting statement also notedthat votes for similar proposals averaged 55 percent through September 2014 and sim-ilar bylaws have been adopted by Chesapeake Energy, Hewlett Packard, WesternUnion and Verizon Communications.

During the 2015 proxy season, over 90 proxy access shareholder proposals appearedon ballots, and as of the end of 2015, approximately 100 issuers have adopted some formof proxy access, with much of this momentum prompted by the Boardroom AccountabilityProject. As the 2016 proxy season approaches, more and more larger issuers have beenconsidering the topic and deciding whether to implement proxy access.

Most proxy access bylaw provisions adopted this year have included a 3% owner-ship threshold, a 3-year continuous holding period, a 20% nomination limit and a 20member limit on groups of nominating shareholders. Issuers and shareholders continueto debate a number of other important provisions:

• Maximum number of nominees. The Boardroom Accountability Projectshareholder proposal and Rule 14a-11 both contemplated that the maximumnumber of proxy access nominees would be 25%, but many bylaw provi-sions include 20% maximum on the percentage of the board that may berepresented by proxy access nominees. CII’s proxy access best practicesdisfavor any percentage maximum which results in less than 2 nominees.

• Nominating Shareholder Groups. Shareholder proposals submitted to issuersduring the 2015 proxy season did not usually contemplate limitations on thenumber of shareholders who could aggregate their holdings to meet mini-mum ownership requirements. Recently adopted bylaw provisions havetended to include a limitation on the aggregation by up to 20 eligible share-holders to meet the 3%-for-3 years ownership threshold.

• Treatment of Loaned Shares. Consistent with the CII’s best practices, manyproxy access bylaws include provisions which treat loaned shares as con-tinuously owned for the purposes of the 3-year ownership requirement, pro-vided that the nominating shareholder has the right to recall the loanedshares and does so as of the date of the nomination notice, when thenominating shareholder is notified that the nominees will be included in theproxy materials, or in time to vote the securities at the meeting.

135RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (148)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

• Nominee Compensation. Also consistent with CII’s best practices, manyproxy access bylaws tend to allow proxy access nominees to have some formof compensation arrangement with a third party for serving as a director ofthe issuer, provided that such compensation arrangements are disclosed.Again, these provisions appear to be bringing adopted proxy access bylawprovisions more in line with the CII’s best practices.

• Proxy Access Nominees. Issuers are taking varied approaches to incumbentproxy access nominees, as well as restrictions on the eligibility of repeatnominating shareholders. In many cases, incumbent proxy access nomineeswill continue to count against the maximum number of permitted proxyaccess nominees. Some proxy access bylaws include a restriction that wouldprevent a shareholder (or group) from nominating further proxy accessnominees for at least two or three years if that shareholder (or group) alreadyhas a proxy access nominee serving on the board. In another example ofevolving practice, a significant number of proxy access bylaw provisionswould exclude nominees who received less than a certain level of support ina prior meeting during a period of up to two years. CII’s best practicesoppose any restriction on re-nomination due to the outcome of a prior vote.

• Other Terms. Some other relevant terms include director qualifications, aprohibition on nominating other nominees by the nominating shareholder, aprohibition on engaging in any sort of solicitation for any other shareholdernominee, a prohibition on entering into voting commitments or entering intovoting commitments without disclosure, and a prohibition on using the issu-er’s proxy statement if the issuer receives notice that the shareholder intendsto nominate a candidate at the issuer’s annual meeting.

KEY PROXY ADVISER VOTING GUIDELINES FOR 2016

The proxy advisory firms Glass Lewis and ISS released the 2016 updates to theirU.S. proxy voting guidelines. These updates do not reflect major revisions to policies,but rather reflect changes to specific areas of concern for the proxy advisory servicesand their institutional investor clients.

GLASS LEWIS UPDATES

Glass Lewis updated its 2016 proxy voting guidelines with the following notablechanges:

Conflicting Management and Shareholder Proposals. When analyzing and

136RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (149)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

determining whether to support conflicting management and shareholder proposals,Glass Lewis indicated that it will consider the following:

• The nature of the underlying issue;

• The benefit to shareholders for implementation of the proposal;

• The materiality of the differences between the terms of the shareholderproposal and management proposal;

• The appropriateness of the provisions in the context of a company’s share-holder base, corporate structure and other relevant circ*mstances; and

• An issuer’s overall governance profile and, specifically, its responsiveness toshareholders as evidenced by an issuer’s response to previous shareholderproposals and its adoption of progressive shareholder rights provisions.

Exclusive Forum Provisions. In its revised policies, Glass Lewis refined itsapproach to issuers that include exclusive forum provisions in their governing docu-ments in connection with an initial public offering. Specifically, Glass Lewis will nolonger recommend that shareholders vote against the chairman of the nominating andgovernance committees in such situations, but instead, for new public issuers, willweigh the presence of an exclusive forum provision in the bylaws in conjunction withother provisions that it believes will unduly limit shareholder rights. Such provisionsinclude supermajority vote requirements, a classified board or a fee-shifting bylawprovision. However, Glass Lewis’s policy to recommend voting against the chairmanof the nominating and governance committee when an issuer adopts an exclusiveforum provision without shareholder approval outside of a spin-off, merger or IPO willnot change.

Environmental and Social Risk Oversight. Glass Lewis codified its policyregarding the responsibilities of a board of directors for oversight of environmentaland social issues. In cases where the board or management, in Glass Lewis’s view, hasfailed to sufficiently identify and manage a material environmental or social risk thatdid or could negatively impact shareholder value, Glass Lewis will recommend share-holders vote against directors responsible for risk oversight in consideration of thenature of the risk and the potential effect on shareholder value.

Nominating Committee Performance. Glass Lewis revised its guidelines toclarify that it may consider recommending shareholders vote against the chair of the

137RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (150)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

nominating committee where the board’s failure to ensure the board has directors withrelevant experience, either through periodic director assessment or board refreshment,has contributed to a company’s poor performance.

Director Overboarding. Glass Lewis noted that, in 2016, it will closely reviewdirector board commitments and may note as a concern instances of directors servingon more than five total boards, for directors who are not also executives, and morethan two total boards for a director who serves as an executive of a public issuer.

Glass Lewis’s voting recommendations in 2016, however, will continue to bebased on the firm’s existing thresholds of three total boards for a director who servesas an executive of a public issuer, and six total boards for directors who are not publicissuer executives.

Glass Lewis indicated that, beginning in 2017, it generally will recommend vot-ing against a director who serves as an executive officer of any public issuer whileserving on a total of more than two public issuer boards, and any other director whoserves on a total of more than five public issuer boards.

ISS UPDATES

ISS released its voting policy changes for 2016, which are effective for share-holder meetings taking place on or after February 1, 2016. Among the notable changesto the guidelines included:

Director Overboarding. Current ISS policy considers a director “overboarded”if he or she sits on more than six public issuer boards—or, if he or she is also a CEO,more than two public issuer boards (not counting subsidiaries of the CEO’s “homeboard”). In its updated policy, ISS noted that, for most directors except for standingCEOs, the maximum number of public issuer boards that a director can sit on beforebeing considered “overboarded” is being reduced from six to five. ISS will allow aone-year grace period until 2017, giving directors and issuers sufficient time to makeany changes in advance of the 2017 proxy season, should they wish to do so. During2016, ISS will highlight if a director is on more than five public issuer boards, butadverse voting recommendations will not be issued under this new overboardingpolicy unless the current policy’s maximum of six boards is exceeded. For CEOs, thecurrent overboarding limit will remain at two outside directorships. ISS revised itspolicy in light of the increasing demands on public issuer directors over the decadesince its prior framework was first developed.

138RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (151)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

Unilateral Board Actions. When a unilateral board amendment of the articles orbylaws adversely affects shareholder rights, current ISS policy provides for adversevote recommendations on individual directors or the full board at the next annualmeeting. Unilateral board actions many include, among other things, “classifying theboard” or “establishing supermajority vote requirements for bylaw/charteramendments.”

ISS has updated its policy to distinguish between (i) unilateral board adoptions ofbylaw or charter provisions made prior to or in connection with an issuer’s initial pub-lic offering (IPO); and (ii) unilateral board amendments to those documents made afteran issuer’s IPO. For newly public issuers that have taken action to diminish share-holder rights prior to or in connection with the IPO, the updated policy calls for a case-by-case approach to withhold votes in subsequent years, with significant weight givento shareholders’ ability to change the governance structure in the future through asimple majority vote, and their ability to hold directors accountable through annualdirector elections. A public commitment by the issuer to put the adverse provisions toa shareholder vote within three years of the IPO can be a mitigating factor.

For established public issuers, ISS’s updated policy generally calls for continuingto withhold votes from directors who have unilaterally adopted a classified boardstructure, implemented supermajority vote requirements to amend the bylaws or char-ter, or eliminated shareholders’ ability to amend the bylaws altogether.

Compensation of Externally Managed Issuers. ISS had not historically consid-ered insufficient disclosure of compensation arrangements for executives at anexternally managed issuer as a problematic pay practice under ISS policy.

ISS had revised its policy to provide that an externally managed issuer’s failure toprovide sufficient disclosure for shareholders to reasonably assess compensation forthe named executive officers will be deemed a problematic pay practice, and generallywarrant a recommendation to vote against the say-on-pay proposal.

Proxy Access. ISS has not revised its fundamental approach to management andshareholder proposals to adopt proxy access and ISS will continue to vote case-by-casefor each director on the ballot in the case of a proxy contest or proxy access, consider-ing a variety of factors.

In updated Frequently Asked Questions published on December 18, 2015, ISSprovided further guidance on its approach to proxy access proposals and proxy accessnominees. Under ISS’s Board Responsiveness policy guidelines, ISS will evaluate a

139RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (152)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

board’s response to a majority supported shareholder proposal for proxy access byexamining whether the major points of the shareholder proposal are beingimplemented. Further, ISS will examine additional provisions that were not included inthe shareholder proposal in order to assess whether such provisions unnecessarilyrestrict the use of a proxy access right. Any vote recommendations driven by a board’simplementation of proxy access may pertain to individual directors, nominating/governance committee members, or the entire board, as appropriate.

ISS may issue an adverse recommendation if a proxy access policy implementedor proposed by management contains material restrictions more stringent than thoseincluded in a majority-supported proxy access shareholder proposal with respect to thefollowing, at a minimum:

• Ownership thresholds above three percent;

• Ownership duration longer than three years;

• Aggregation limits below 20 shareholders;

• A cap on nominees below 20 percent of the board.

In instances where the cap or aggregation limit differs from what was specificallystated in the shareholder proposal, the lack of disclosure by the issuer regarding share-holder outreach efforts and engagement may also warrant negative vote recom-mendations.

If an implemented proxy access policy or management proxy access proposalcontains restrictions or conditions on proxy access nominees, ISS will review theimplementation and restrictions on a case-by-case basis. Restrictions that would beviewed as problematic include:

• Prohibitions on resubmission of failed nominees in subsequent years;

• Restrictions on third-party compensation of proxy access nominees;

• Restrictions on the use of proxy access and proxy contest procedures for thesame meeting;

• How long and under what terms an elected shareholder nominee will counttowards the maximum number of proxy access nominees; and

140RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (153)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

• When the right will be fully implemented and accessible to qualifying share-holders.

ISS considers two types of restrictions to be especially problematic, because theyare so restrictive as to effectively nullify the proxy access right:

• Counting individual funds within a mutual fund family as separate share-holders for purposes of an aggregation limit; and

• The imposition of post-meeting shareholding requirements for nominatingshareholders.

Recognizing the differences between evaluating a candidate in a proxy accesssituation as compared to a proxy contest situation, ISS has created additional analyticallatitude for evaluating candidates nominated through proxy access. When evaluatingproxy access candidates, ISS will consider, among other factors:

• Nominee/Nominator specific factors:

• Nominators’ rationale;

• Nominators’ critique of management/incumbent directors; and

• Nominee’s qualifications, independence, and overall fitness for director-ship.

• Issuer specific factors:

• Issuer performance relative to its peers;

• Background to the contested situation (if applicable);

• Board’s track record and responsiveness;

• Independence of directors/nominees;

• Governance profile of the company;

• Evidence of board entrenchment;

• Current board composition (skill sets, tenure, diversity, etc.); and

• Ongoing controversies, if any.

141RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (154)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

• Election specific factors:

• Whether the number of nominees exceeds the number of board seats; and

• Vote standard for the election of directors.

HEDGING AND PLEDGING POLICIES

Over the past few years, considerable attention has been focused on policiesaddressing the hedging and pledging of securities by an issuer’s employees, executivesand directors. In particular, significant market volatility has brought to light some keyissues arising from the pledging of issuer securities by employees, executives anddirectors of issuers, including concerns as to whether an individual’s interests remainaligned with shareholders through his or her pledging of equity awards or other sharesowned to secure loans. Similar concerns have been raised with regard to hedging andmonetization arrangements, where employees, executives or directors may seek tocontinue to own issuer securities obtained through the company’s benefit plans orotherwise, but without the full risks and rewards of ownership.

BACKGROUND

Hedging or monetization transactions can be accomplished through a number ofpossible mechanisms, including, but not limited to, through the use of financialinstruments such as exchange funds, prepaid variable forwards, equity swaps, puts,calls, collars, forwards and other derivative instruments, or through the establishmentof a short position in the issuer’s securities. In addition, individuals may seek to secureloans by pledging the issuer’s stock as collateral for the loan, including through the useof traditional margin accounts with a broker. Because securities held in a marginaccount as collateral for a margin loan may be sold by the broker without the custom-er’s consent if the customer fails to meet a margin call, and securities pledged (orhypothecated) as collateral for a loan may be sold in foreclosure if the borrowerdefaults on the loan, significant concerns have been raised when the margin sale orforeclosure sale may occur at a time when the pledgor is aware of material nonpublicinformation or otherwise is not permitted to trade in the issuer’s securities. The issuermay also face potentially adverse public perceptions when employees, executives anddirectors engage in these types of transactions.

REGULATORY DEVELOPMENTS

The Dodd-Frank Act directed the SEC to adopt rules requiring disclosure ofwhether any employee or director is permitted to purchase financial instruments that

142RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (155)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

are designed to hedge or offset any decrease in the market value of equity securitiesgranted as compensation or held directly or indirectly by the employee or director.While the SEC has not yet adopted rules implementing this directive, public compa-nies have felt pressure from institutional investors and proxy advisory firms to disclosethe issuer’s policies about hedging and monetization transactions. Meanwhile, the SECfirst required disclosure of shares pledged by the highest paid executive officers andthe company’s directors beginning in 2006, focusing additional attention on thesearrangements in the context of an issuer’s overall corporate governance and compensa-tion policies and practices.

ISS POLICY

ISS adopted policy changes for the 2013 proxy season that focused additional atten-tion on pledging and hedging activities when ISS is conducting its analysis for determiningvote recommendations on the election of directors. This policy change reflected the resultsof ISS’s 2012-13 policy survey, where 49% of institutional respondents and 45% of com-pany respondents indicated that any pledging of issuer stock by executive officers or direc-tors is significantly problematic. ISS takes a case-by-case approach in determining whetherpledging of company stock rises to a serious concern for shareholders, and has includedsignificant pledging of issuer stock as a failure of risk oversight for which directors shouldbe held accountable (as opposed to as a consideration relevant to making a recommendationon a say-on-pay proposal). In determining vote recommendations for the election of direc-tors at companies who currently have executives or directors with pledged common stock,ISS considers the following factors: (i) the presence in the issuer’s proxy statement of ananti-pledging policy that prohibits future pledging activities; (ii) the magnitude of aggregatepledged shares in terms of the total common shares outstanding or the market value or trad-ing volume of the common stock; (iii) disclosure of progress (or lack thereof) in reducingthe magnitude of aggregate pledged shares over time; (iv) disclosure in the proxy statementthat stock ownership or holding requirements do not include pledged company stock; and(v) any other relevant factors. With regard to hedging, the updated policy notes that hedgingcompany stock “severs the ultimate alignment with shareholders’ interests,” therefore anyamounts hedged will be considered a problematic practice potentially warranting a negativevoting recommendation on the election of directors.

ADOPTING OR REVISITING POLICIES

The increasing level of disclosure, the heightened investor scrutiny and the consid-eration accorded by proxy advisory firms has caused many issuers to adopt policiesabout hedging, monetization or pledging transactions, or revisit existing policies to

143RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (156)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

consider whether the scope or coverage of such policies should be changed. Theoptions that issuers have pursued include:

• Prohibiting hedging, monetization and/or pledging transactions for executiveofficers and directors, or perhaps even for all employees and directors;

• Subjecting hedging, monetization and/or pledging transactions to a pre-approval process;

• Restricting the types of hedging, monetization and/or pledging transactionsthat may be undertaken; or

• Permitting hedging, monetization or pledging transactions without any spe-cific policy on their use.

The variation in approaches reflects how situations differ substantially fromcompany to company, and from individual to individual. In some cases, hedging,monetization or pledging transactions may serve legitimate tax planning or other pur-poses, thereby making a complete prohibition on such transactions unworkable. Forthis reason, some issuers have chosen to address the situation though a pre-clearanceprocess, which provides compliance personnel within the organization the ability tocarefully analyze a transaction before an individual proceeds with the transaction.Other issuers may choose to restrict only certain types of transactions, particularlywhere it is perceived that the risks to the company and the participating individualsmay be high.

Another key area of consideration is the extent of coverage for these policies. TheDodd-Frank Act disclosure requirement will seek disclosure with respect policiesconcerning all employees and directors, while in many cases issuers have adoptedpolicies that are specifically limited to the issuer’s executive officers and directors.Issuers are often concerned that adopting policies broadly applicable to all employeesand directors may be difficult to communicate and enforce.

Some issuers have also sought to extend prohibitions to other types of short-termor speculative transactions, such as trading in exchange traded puts and calls on theissuer’s securities, or short-term trading transactions (i.e., buying and selling the issu-er’s securities within six months).

144RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (157)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

LOCATION OF POLICIES

Very often, policies with regard to hedging, monetization or pledging areincluded in an issuer’s insider trading policy. Some issuers have adopted standalonepolicies addressing some or all of these topics, while others have incorporated theseconcepts into the issuer’s code of conduct, stock ownership guidelines and corporategovernance guidelines.

CONCLUSION

With the advent of advisory votes on executive compensation and increased dis-closure regarding a wide variety of “hot button” issues for shareholders, we will con-tinue to see issuers adopting or revisiting their policies concerning hedging,monetization and/or pledging transactions.

FORM OF HEDGING AND PLEDGING POLICY

[Note: This policy may be incorporated into other policies of the company,such as the insider trading policy]

INTRODUCTION

Hedging or monetization transactions can be accomplished through a number ofpossible mechanisms, including, but not limited to, through the use of financialinstruments such as exchange funds, prepaid variable forwards, equity swaps, puts,calls, collars, forwards and other derivative instruments, or through the establishmentof a short position in the Company’s securities. Such hedging and monetization trans-actions may permit an [employee,] officer or director to continue to own the securitiesof [Company Name] (the “Company”) obtained through Company’s benefit plans orotherwise, but without the full risks and rewards of ownership. When that occurs, thedirector, officer or employee may no longer have the same objectives as the Compa-ny’s other stockholders. Moreover, certain short-term or speculative transactions in theCompany’s securities by [employees,] officers and directors create the potential forheightened legal risk and/or the appearance of improper or inappropriate conductinvolving the Company’s securities.

OBJECTIVES

The objectives of this Policy are to: (1) prohibit the Company’s [employees,] officersand directors from directly or indirectly engaging in hedging or monetization trans-

145RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (158)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

actions, through transactions in the Company’s securities or through the use of finan-cial instruments designed for such purpose; and (2) prohibit [employees,] officers anddirectors from engaging in short-term or speculative transactions in the Company’ssecurities that could create heightened legal risk and/or the appearance of improper orinappropriate conduct by the Company’s employees, officers or directors.

APPLICABILITY

This policy applies to all of the Company’s [employees,] officers and directors. TheBoard of Directors may determine whether the policy should apply to otherindividuals, including consultants and contractors to the Company.

POLICY

The Company’s [employees,] officers and directors may not engage in any hedg-ing or monetization transactions with respect to the Company’s securities, including,but not limited to, through the use of financial instruments such as exchange funds,prepaid variable forwards, equity swaps, puts, calls, collars, forwards and otherderivative instruments, or through the establishment of a short position in the Compa-ny’s securities. Further, the Company’s [employees,] officers and directors may notengage in the following in short-term or speculative transactions in the Company’ssecurities that could create heightened legal risk and/or the appearance of improper orinappropriate conduct by the Company’s employees, officers or directors:

• Short-Term Trading. Short-term trading of the Company’s securities may bedistracting to the person and may unduly focus the person on the Company’sshort-term stock market performance, instead of the Company’s long-termbusiness objectives. For these reasons, any [employee,] officer or director ofthe Company who purchases the Company’s securities in the open marketmay not sell any Company securities of the same class during the six monthsfollowing the purchase (or vice versa).

• Short Sales. Short sales of the Company’s securities (i.e., the sale of a secu-rity that the seller does not own) may evidence an expectation on the part ofthe seller that the securities will decline in value, and therefore have thepotential to signal to the market that the seller lacks confidence in theCompany’s prospects. In addition, short sales may reduce a seller’s incentiveto seek to improve the Company’s performance. For these reasons, shortsales of the Company’s securities by [employees,] officers or directors are

146RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (159)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

prohibited. Short sales arising in certain types of hedging transactions aregoverned by this Policy’s prohibition on hedging transactions, as describedabove.

• Publicly-Traded Options. Given the relatively short term of publicly-tradedoptions, transactions in options may cause an [employee,] officer or directorto focus on short-term performance at the expense of the Company’s long-term objectives. Accordingly, this Policy prohibits transactions by[employees,] officers or directors in put options, call options or otherderivative securities related to the Company’s securities, on an exchange orin any other organized market. Transactions in options arising in certaintypes of hedging transactions are governed by this Policy’s prohibition onhedging transactions, as described above.

Margin Accounts and Pledged Securities. Securities held in a margin account ascollateral for a margin loan may be sold by the broker without the customer’s consentif the customer fails to meet a margin call. Similarly, securities pledged (orhypothecated) as collateral for a loan may be sold in foreclosure if the borrowerdefaults on the loan. Because a margin sale or foreclosure sale may occur at a timewhen the pledgor is aware of material nonpublic information or otherwise is notpermitted to trade in the Company’s securities, [employees,] officers and directors areprohibited from holding the Company’s securities in a margin account or otherwisepledging the Company’s securities as collateral for a loan. Pledges of Company Secu-rities arising from certain types of hedging transactions are governed by this Policy’sprohibition on hedging transactions, as described above. [An exception to this prohib-ition may be granted where a person covered by this Policy wishes to pledge theCompany’s securities as collateral for a loan (not including margin debt) and clearlydemonstrates the financial capacity to repay the loan without resort to the pledgedsecurities. Any person seeking an exception from this policy must submit a request forpre-approval to the [designated Compliance Officer] at least two weeks prior to thecontemplated transaction and the person should be advised that any sale of stock bythe pledgee will be deemed a sale by the pledgor for purposes of the short-swing profitrecovery provisions of Section 16 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended(the “Exchange Act”), and the prohibition on insider trading in Rule 10b-5 under theExchange Act.]

147RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (160)

CHAPTER 5

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONSABOUT SHAREHOLDER PROPOSALS

AND PROXY ACCESS

148RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (161)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT SHAREHOLDERPROPOSALS AND PROXY ACCESS

SHAREHOLDER PROPOSALS

Shareholder proposals are matters that shareholders of an issuer seek to haveacted on at an annual or other meeting of the issuer. In accordance with the require-ments specified in state corporation laws and in an issuer’s organizational documents,a shareholder could seek to have a matter voted on by raising the matter at a meetingof shareholders. Alternatively, a qualifying shareholder could seek to include theproposal in the issuer’s proxy statement under Rule 14a-8 adopted under Section 14(a)of the Exchange Act, and thereby have the issuer solicit proxies with respect to theproposal that would be presented at the meeting. The following Questions andAnswers address many of the common issues that arise with regard to shareholderproposals and proxy access.

SHAREHOLDER PROPOSALS GENERALLY

Who submits shareholder proposals to companies?

Shareholder proposals come from a wide variety of shareholders, sometimesreferred to as “proponents.” Shareholder proponents may be individual investors whoare seeking to raise a particular issue or implement a policy at an issuer, corporate“gadflies” who seek to bring about changes to corporate activity through the share-holder proposal process, activist investors who are seeking to bring about a change-in-control or a change in the strategy or policies of the company, and institutionalinvestors who may be focused on particular corporate governance or social issues.

Who regulates the shareholder proposal process?

The SEC has adopted Rule 14a-8 as a means to control the process wherebyproponents seek to have shareholder proposals included in the proxy statements ofissuers, and the SEC Staff is involved in considering the arguments of companies thatseek to exclude shareholder proposals based on the operation of Rule 14a-8 through aprocess whereby companies typically seek a “no-action letter” from the Staff withregard to whether the company may exclude the shareholder proposal. Under Rule14a-8, an issuer must include a shareholder proposal in its proxy materials unless itviolates one of the rule’s eligibility and procedural requirements or falls within one ofthe rule’s thirteen substantive bases for exclusion.

149RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (162)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

THE SCOPE OF RULE 14A-8

Does Rule 14a-8 require that all shareholder proposals be included in an issuer’sproxy statement?

Under Rule 14a-8, an issuer must include a shareholder proposal in its proxymaterials unless it violates one of the rule’s eligibility and procedural requirements, orone of the thirteen substantive bases for exclusion specified in the rule.

What are the eligibility and procedural requirements for shareholder proposalsunder Rule 14a-8?

Rule 14a-8 imposes several eligibility and procedural requirements on share-holders who rely on the rule. A shareholder may only submit one proposal per meet-ing, must own at least $2,000 or 1% of securities entitled to vote on the proposal andmust limit its proposal to 500 words. A shareholder must submit the proposal at least120 days before the date of the issuer’s proxy statement for the previous year’s annualmeeting (or a reasonable time before the issuer begins to print and mail its proxy mate-rials if the issuer did not have an annual meeting during the previous year, or if thedate of the annual meeting has been changed by more than 30 days from the date ofthe previous year’s annual meeting). An issuer that intends to rely on the rule toexclude a proposal must submit its “no-action” request 80 days in advance of the datethat it proposes to file its definitive proxy materials.

What are the substantive requirements under Rule 14a-8?

Under paragraph (i) of Rule 14a-8, an issuer may exclude a shareholder proposalfrom its proxy materials if the proposal falls into one of thirteen specific substantivebases for exclusion. These substantive bases represent areas that the SEC hasdetermined over the years to not be appropriate matters for consideration by share-holders through the shareholder proposal process. To exclude a proposal, an issuermust first notify the SEC, which is typically done through a request for a “no-action”letter. In the no-action letter request, an issuer may argue that the subject shareholderproposal can be excluded under more than one basis for exclusion.

How does the no-action letter process work with respect to shareholder proposals?

The central component of the Rule 14a-8 process is the no-action letter. A no-action letter is a letter from the Staff that provides the Staff’s informal view regardingwhether it would recommend enforcement action to the SEC if the issuer takes thecourse of action described in the no-action request. No-action letters reflect the Staff’s

150RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (163)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

views concerning the application of securities laws to a particular set of facts. In thecontext of Rule 14a-8, no-action letters often serve as a key hurdle for shareholdersthat hope to include a proposal in an issuer’s proxy materials.

There is no rule that requires the submission of no-action requests, nor is there arule that requires that the Staff respond to such requests. Issuers submit requests tocomply with Rule 14a-8(j), which requires that issuers “file their reasons” with theSEC. The Staff responds to such requests as a convenience to both issuers and share-holders, and in order to assist both issuers and shareholders in complying with theproxy rules. While the Staff’s no-action letters typically address whether the issuer hasa basis to exclude the proposal, there also may be times when the Staff will say thatthere appears to be some basis for the issuer’s objection, but the problem can be curedif the proponent changes the proposal in some specific way, for example, the propo-nent makes a mandatory proposal into a nonbinding proposal, or deletes certain wordsor sentences in the proposal to avoid vagueness.

Some issuers have elected to submit a notice to the SEC of the company’sintention to exclude the proposal, and then file suit in federal court seeking a declara-tory judgment as to whether the proposal may be excluded under Rule 14a-8(i)(8).

THE ELIGIBILITY AND PROCEDURAL REQUIREMENTS OF RULE 14A-8

What are the requirements as to ownership for submitting shareholder proposals?

A shareholder proposal may be submitted under Rule 14a-8 by a proponent whohas held at least $2,000 worth of the issuer’s stock (or 1% of the shares eligible tovote, whichever figure is smaller) continuously for at least one year before the date theproposal is submitted to the issuer. Further, the proponent must hold the securitiesthrough the date of the annual meeting.

How does a proponent demonstrate that the ownership requirements have beensatisfied?

Under Rule 14a-8(b), at the time a shareholder submits a proposal, the share-holder must prove eligibility by being a record holder of the securities that the issuercould verify on its own, or by submitting either:

• A written statement from the record holder of the securities (usually a brokeror bank that is a DTC participant) verifying that, at the time the shareholdersubmits the proposal, the shareholder continuously held at least $2,000 inmarket value or 1% of the company’s securities entitled to vote on the pro-

151RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (164)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

posal at the meeting for at least one year by the date the shareholder sub-mitted the proposal; or

• A copy of a Schedule 13D, Schedule 13G, Form 3, Form 4, Form 5, oramendments to those documents or updated forms, reflecting the share-holder’s ownership of the shares as of or before the date on which the one-year eligibility period begins.

Rule 14a-8(b)(2)(i) provides that, in addition to the proof of ownership, “You [theshareholder proponent] must also include your own written statement that you intendto continue to hold the securities through the date of the meeting of shareholders.”

What must a proponent submit if the proponent is not the record holder of thesecurities?

Usually, a proponent would submit a written statement from the “record” holderof the securities (usually a broker or bank that is a DTC participant) verifying that, atthe time the shareholder submits the proposal, the shareholder continuously held atleast $2,000 in market value or 1% of the company’s securities entitled to vote on theproposal at the meeting for at least one year by the date the shareholder submitted theproposal. In Staff Legal Bulletin No. 14F (“SLB 14F”), the Staff clarified that onlyDTC participants should be viewed as “record” holders of securities that are depositedwith DTC. In Staff Legal Bulletin No. 14G (“SLB 14G”) the Staff states that “forpurposes of Rule 14a-8(b)(2)(i), a proof of ownership letter from an affiliate of a DTCparticipant satisfies the requirement to provide a proof of ownership letter from a DTCparticipant.”

In accordance with this guidance, a shareholder that owns shares through a brokeror bank that is not a DTC participant or an affiliate of a DTC participant must obtainand submit two proof of ownership statements – one from the shareholder’s broker orbank confirming the shareholder’s ownership and one from the DTC participant or anaffiliate of the DTC participant through which the securities are held confirming theownership of the shareholder’s broker or bank.

An issuer that seeks to exclude a shareholder proposal from its proxy materials onthe basis of proof of ownership now must take at least the following steps:(i) determine whether the shareholder is a registered shareholder by checking its list ofregistered shareholders; (ii) review the proof of ownership to see if the bank or brokerproviding such proof is a DTC participant by comparing such bank or broker’s name

152RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (165)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

against the list of DTC participants; and (iii) notify the shareholder that the person thatprovided proof of ownership is not a DTC participant and request that the shareholderobtain a second letter demonstrating proof of ownership from the bank or broker that isa DTC participant through which the other bank or broker holds shares.

Is there particular language that a proponent should have its broker or bank usewhen providing the proof of ownership information?

SLB 14F also suggests that a shareholder proponent use the following format tohave its broker or bank provide the required proof of ownership as of the date theshareholder plans to submit the proposal: “As of [date the proposal is submitted],[name of shareholder] held, and has held continuously for at least one year, [number ofsecurities] shares of [company name] [class of securities].” Noting situations whereproof of ownership letters that do not verify a proponent’s beneficial ownership for theentire one-year period preceding and including the date the proposal was submitted, asrequired by Rule 14a-8(b)(1), the Staff made clear in SLB 14G that a notice of defectin these situations would not satisfy the notice requirement unless the notice actuallymentions the discrepancy in the period of ownership covered by the proponent’s proofof ownership letter.

How does a proponent determine the market value of the securities held for thepurposes of eligibility to submit a proposal under Rule 14a-8?

The Staff noted in Staff Legal Bulletin No. 14 (“SLB 14”) that, in order todetermine whether the shareholder satisfies the $2,000 threshold, the Staff looks atwhether, on any date within the 60 calendar days before the date the shareholder sub-mits the proposal, the shareholder’s investment is valued at $2,000 or greater, based onthe average of the bid and ask prices. If bid and ask prices are not available, then themarket value is determined by multiplying the number of securities the shareholderheld for the one-year period by the highest selling price during the 60 calendar daysbefore the shareholder submitted the proposal. The Staff notes that a security’s highestselling price is not necessarily the same as its highest closing price.

How many proposals may a shareholder proponent submit?

Under Rule 14a-8(c), a proponent may submit no more than one proposal for aparticular shareholders’ meeting.

153RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (166)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

How long can a shareholder proposal be?

Under Rule 14a-8(d), the proposal, including any accompanying supporting state-ment, may not exceed 500 words.

The Staff notes, in SLB 14, that any statements which are arguments “in supportof the proposal” are considered to be part of the supporting statement, therefore, anytitle or heading in the proposal meeting that test may be counted toward the 500-wordlimitation. In general, the reference to a website address does not violate the 500 wordlimitation by virtue of indirectly including the content of the website in the proposaland supporting statement. In SLB 14, the Staff indicated that it counts a websiteaddress as one word for purposes of the 500-word limitation because the Staff does notbelieve that a website address raises the concern that Rule 14a-8(d) was intended toaddress.

What is the deadline for submitting a shareholder proposal?

Rule 14a-8(e)(2) requires that proposals for a regularly scheduled annual meetingbe received at the issuer’s principal executive offices by a date not less than 120calendar days before the date of the company’s proxy statement released to share-holders in connection with the previous year’s annual meeting. The deadline forshareholder proposals is included in the issuer’s proxy statement, and is determined by(i) starting with the release date disclosed in the previous year’s proxy statement;(ii) increasing the year by one; and (iii) counting back 120 calendar days.

Must a proponent or a proponent’s designee attend the meeting to present theproposal?

Rule 14a-8(h)(1) requires that the proponent or the proponent’s qualified repre-sentative attend the shareholders’ meeting to present the proposal. Rule 14a-8(h)(3)provides that an issuer may exclude a proponent’s proposals for two calendar years ifthe issuer included one of the proponent’s proposals in its proxy materials for a share-holders’ meeting, neither the proponent nor the proponent’s qualified representativeappeared and presented the proposal, and the proponent did not demonstrate “goodcause” for failing to attend the meeting or present the proposal.

If a proponent voluntarily provides a written statement evidencing an intention toact contrary to Rule 14a-8(h)(1) and not attend the meeting, Rule 14a-8(i)(3)(discussed below) may serve as a basis for the issuer to exclude the proposal becausethe proponent’s actions are contrary to the proxy rules.

154RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (167)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

What must a company do if it seeks to exclude a proposal based on the failure of theproponent to meet one these eligibility and procedural requirements?

If a shareholder fails to follow the eligibility or procedural requirements of Rule14a-8, Rule 14a-8(f) provides that an issuer may exclude a proposal from its proxymaterials due to eligibility or procedural defects if (i) within 14 calendar days ofreceiving the proposal, the company provides the shareholder with written notice ofthe defect or defects with the proposal, including the time frame for responding; and(ii) the shareholder fails to respond to this notice within 14 calendar days of receivingthe notice of the defect or defects, or the shareholder timely responds but does not curethe eligibility or procedural defect(s). If the shareholder does not timely respond orremedy the defect(s) and the issuer intends to exclude the proposal, the issuer muststill submit, to the Staff and the shareholder, a copy of the proposal and the reasons forexcluding the proposal.

The issuer does not need to provide the shareholder with a notice of defect if thedefect cannot be remedied; however, the issuer must still submit its reasons regardingexclusion of the proposal to the Staff and the shareholder. The shareholder may, but isnot required to, submit a reply to the Staff with a copy sent to the company.

Under what circ*mstances must a company accept a revised shareholder proposal?

Under guidance provided in SLB 14F, if a shareholder proponent submits arevised proposal before the issuer’s deadline for shareholder proposals, the issuer mustaccept the revised proposal. If a shareholder submits a revised proposal after the issu-er’s deadline, the company does not have to accept the revised proposal.

Does the Staff provide responses to no-action requests by e-mail?

The Staff indicated in SLB 14F that it now transmits Rule 14a-8 no-actionresponses by e-mail to issuers and proponents, provided that they include e-mailaddresses for recipients in their correspondence.

Can a no-action letter be withdrawn?

If an issuer determines that it does not want to obtain a Staff response to a pend-ing no-action request, because, for example, the company has negotiated with theproponent to withdraw the proposal or the issuer has elected to include the proposal inits proxy statement, then the issuer should submit a letter to the Staff requesting with-drawal of the no-action request.

155RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (168)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

THE SUBSTANTIVE BASES FOR EXCLUSION OF SHAREHOLDER PROPOSALS UNDER

RULE 14A-8

Rule 14a-8(i)(1) provides that a proposal is excludable when it is not a propersubject for action by shareholders under the laws of the jurisdiction of the issuer’sorganization. Under what circ*mstances is this basis for exclusion applicable?

Rule 14-8(i)(1) focuses on proposals that would not be a proper subject for share-holder action. With respect to subjects and procedures for shareholder votes, most statecorporation laws provide that a corporation’s charter or bylaws can specify the typesof proposals that are permitted to be brought before the shareholders for a vote at anannual or special meeting. The SEC indicates that, depending on the subject matter, aproposal that would bind the issuer if approved by shareholders may not be consideredproper under state law. Proposals cast as recommendations or requests that the boardof directors take specified action, however, are generally considered proper under statelaw. As a result, the Staff will assume that a proposal drafted as a recommendation orsuggestion is proper unless the company demonstrates otherwise. The Staff will let aproponent amend a proposal to make it a “precatory” recommendation if the companyobjects to the mandatory nature of the proposal.

The Staff has consistently granted no-action relief to corporations under Rule14a-8(i)(1) where a shareholder proposal mandates action that, under state law, fallswithin the powers of the board of directors. For example, the Staff has allowed issuersto exclude proposals that would require a board to declassify a staggered board, whilethe Staff has permitted proposals requesting company “take the steps necessary” todeclassify staggered board.

Issuers must provide a supporting opinion of counsel when the reason forexclusion is based on matters of state or foreign law. Further, under a 2007 amendmentto Delaware law, the SEC may request a legal interpretation from the DelawareSupreme Court. In June 2008, the SEC certified to the Supreme Court questions aboutthe propriety under state law of a shareholder proposal submitted to CA by theAFSCME pension plan.

Rule 14a-8(i)(2) provides that a proposal is excludable when the proposal would, ifimplemented, cause the issuer to violate any state, federal or foreign law to which itis subject. Under what circ*mstances is this basis for exclusion applicable?

Rule 14a-8(i)(2) focuses on situations where the implementation of the share-holder proposal would result in a violation of any state, federal or foreign law. Such a

156RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (169)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

violation could include a violation of applicable corporate law, or it could include theviolation of other laws applicable to the company and its operations. For example, theStaff has allowed an issuer exclude a proposal that would require mandatory boardretirement age, where doing so would violate a state age discrimination law. A note toRule 14a-8(i)(2) provides that an issuer cannot exclude a proposal on the basis that itwould violate foreign law if compliance with that law would result in violation of stateor federal law. As with requests to exclude under Rule 14a-8(i)(1), the Staff will per-mit a proponent to amend a proposal to make it a “precatory” recommendation if thecompany objects to the mandatory nature of the proposal as a potential violation ofstate corporate law.

As with Rule 14a-8(i)(1), companies must provide a supporting opinion of coun-sel when the reason for exclusion is based on matters of state or foreign law. Further,under a 2007 amendment to Delaware law, the SEC may request a legal interpretationfrom the Delaware Supreme Court.

Rule 14a-8(i)(3) provides that a proposal is excludable when the proposal orsupporting statement is contrary to any of the SEC’s proxy rules, including Rule14a-9, which prohibits materially false or misleading statements in proxy solicitingmaterials. Under what circ*mstances is this basis for exclusion applicable?

The Staff has indicated that reliance on Rule 14a-8(i)(3) to exclude or modify astatement may be appropriate where: (i) statements directly or indirectly impugn char-acter, integrity, or personal reputation, or directly or indirectly make charges concern-ing improper, illegal, or immoral conduct or association, without factual foundation;(ii) the company demonstrates objectively that a factual statement is materially false ormisleading; (iii) the resolution contained in the proposal is so inherently vague orindefinite that neither the shareholders voting on the proposal, nor the issuerimplementing the proposal (if adopted), would be able to determine with any reason-able certainty exactly what actions or measures the proposal requires – this objectionalso may be appropriate where the proposal and the supporting statement, when readtogether, have the same result; and (iv) substantial portions of the supporting statementare irrelevant to a consideration of the subject matter of the proposal, such that there isa strong likelihood that a reasonable shareholder would be uncertain as to the matteron which it is being asked to vote.

By contrast, in Staff Legal Bulletin No. 14B (“SLB 14B”), the Staff indicated thatit would not be appropriate for issuer to exclude supporting statement language and/or

157RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (170)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

an entire proposal in reliance on Rule 14a-8(i)(3) in the following circ*mstances:(1) the issuer objects to factual assertions because they are not supported; (2) the issuerobjects to factual assertions that, while not materially false or misleading, may bedisputed or countered; (3) the issuer objects to factual assertions because those asser-tions may be interpreted by shareholders in a manner that is unfavorable to the com-pany, its directors, or its officers; and/or (4) the company objects to statements becausethey represent the opinion of the shareholder proponent or a referenced source, but thestatements are not identified specifically as such.

Under these standards, a request to exclude a proposal in its entirety under Rule14a-8(i)(3) is unlikely to be granted.

Rule 14a-8(i)(4) provides that a proposal is excludable when the proposal relates tothe redress of a personal claim or grievance against the issuer or any other person,or is designed to result in a benefit to the shareholder, or to further a personalinterest, which is not shared by the other shareholders at large. Under whatcirc*mstances is this basis for exclusion applicable?

Rule 14a-8(i)(4) focuses on proposals involving matters that are deemed not torise to the level that shareholders as a whole should vote on as a shareholder proposal.For example, if a proponent is involved in litigation with the issuer, and the proposaldeals with a matter being litigated, that could serve as grounds to exclude the proposalon the theory that the proponent is pursuing its own agenda. The SEC has stated thatRule 14a-8(i)(4) is designed to “insure that the security holder proposal process [is]not abused by proponents attempting to achieve personal ends that are not necessarilyin the common interest of the issuer’s shareholders generally.” See SEC ReleaseNo. 34-20091 (August 16, 1983).

In considering exclusion requests under Rule 14a-8(i)(4), the Staff often looks tothe particular motives of proponent. However, a proponent’s particular objectives neednot be apparent from a proposal’s plain language in order to be excludable under Rule14a-8(i)(4). Rather, proposals phrased in broad terms that “might relate to matterswhich may be of general interest to all security holders” may be omitted from proxymaterials “if it is clear from the facts…that the proponent is using the proposal as atactic designed to…further a personal interest.” See SEC Release No. 34-19135(October 14, 1982). These types of exclusion requests often involve proposals by dis-gruntled former employees of a company relating to personal issues that the formeremployees have with the issuer.

158RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (171)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

Rule 14a-8(i)(5) provides that a proposal is excludable when the proposal relates tooperations that account for less than 5% of the issuer’s total assets at the end of itsmost recent fiscal year, and for less than 5% of its net earnings and gross sales forits most recent fiscal year, and is not otherwise significantly related to the company’sbusiness. Under what circ*mstances is this basis for exclusion applicable?

Rule 14a-8(i)(5) is referred to as the “relevance rule.” A significant focus of theStaff is on whether the proposal relates to operations that are “not otherwise sig-nificantly related to the company’s business.” As a practical matter, the Rule 14a-8(i)(5) exclusion has not been frequently raised successfully in recent years, becauseproponents have been able to frame issues in a way that adequately establishes thesignificance of an issue, even if the economic impact may be minimal. The SEC statedin SEC Release No. 34-19135 (October 14, 1982):

Historically, the Commission staff has taken the position that certainproposals, while relating to only a small portion of the issuer’s operations,raise policy issues of significance to the issuer’s business…For example,the proponent could provide information that indicates that while a partic-ular corporate policy which involves an arguably economically insignif-icant portion of an issuer’s business, the policy may have a significantimpact on other segments of the issuer’s business or subject the issuer tosignificant contingent liabilities.

The Staff has typically been relatively permissive when the Rule 14a-8(i)(5) basisfor exclusion has been raised by issuers, permitting proposals to be included in proxystatements when they are deemed to be of social or political “significance” and some-how related to the issuer’s business, even in some instances where 5% asset and grosssales thresholds were not met.

Rule 14a-8(i)(6) provides that a proposal is excludable when the company wouldlack the power or authority to implement the proposal. Under what circ*mstances isthis basis for exclusion applicable?

Rule 14a-8(i)(6) focuses on proposals requesting that a board of directors dosomething that it lacks the power or authority to implement. For example, the Staff hasallowed exclusion of a proposal that would require an issuer to breach existing con-tracts; however, the Staff has permitted revisions to such a proposal so that it appliedonly to future contracts. Further, the Staff has held that Rule 14a-8(i)(6) applies to a

159RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (172)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

shareholder proposal that, if adopted by the issuer’s shareholders, would cause theissuer to violate applicable state law. With respect to shareholder proposals that, ifadopted by the issuer’s shareholders, would cause the company to violate applicablestate law, see Noble Corporation (January 19, 2007); SBC Communications Inc.(January 11, 2004); Xerox Corp. (February 23, 2004). As with Rule 14a-8(i)(1) andRule 14a-8(i)(2), issuers must provide a supporting opinion of counsel when the rea-son for exclusion is based on matters of state or foreign law. Further, under a 2007amendment to Delaware law, the SEC may request a legal interpretation from theDelaware Supreme Court.

Rule 14a-8(i)(7) provides that a proposal is excludable when the proposal deals witha matter relating to the issuer’s ordinary business operations. Under whatcirc*mstances is this basis for exclusion applicable?

The SEC has explained that the analysis under the “ordinary business” exclusionis based on two key considerations. First, certain tasks “are so fundamental tomanagement’s ability to run a company on a day-to-day basis that they could not, as apractical matter, be subject to direct shareholder oversight.” Examples that the SEChas cited include employee hiring, promotion and termination decisions, decisions onproduction quality or quantity, or the retention of suppliers. Even so, some proposals“focusing on sufficiently significant social policy issues” (such as employmentdiscrimination policies) transcend day-to-day operational matters and raise issues “sosignificant” that shareholders should be afforded the opportunity to express theirviews. The second key consideration relates to “the degree to which the proposal seeksto ‘micro-manage’ the company by probing too deeply into matters of a complexnature upon which, shareowners, as a group, would not be in a position to make aninformed judgment.” Examples cited were proposals involving “intricate detail” orseeking to impose “specific timeframes or methods for implementing complexpolicies.”

Most of the no-action letters under Rule 14a-8(i)(7) arise because the fact that aproposal relates to ordinary business matters does not conclusively establish that anissuer may exclude the proposal from its proxy materials. As the SEC stated in SECRelease No. 34-40018 (May 21, 1988), proposals that relate to ordinary business mat-ters but that focus on “sufficiently significant social policy issues would not beconsidered to be excludable because the proposals would transcend the day-to-daybusiness matters.” Among the areas considered to be significant social policy issuesare: renewable energy generation; antibiotics in foods; health care reform;

160RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (173)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

collateralization of derivatives; loan foreclosures; risk oversight; CEO successionplanning; executive compensation; auditor rotation; environmental matters; SouthAfrica; Myanmar; human rights; net neutrality; and predatory lending.

Rule 14a-8(i)(8) provides that a proposal is excludable when the proposal relates toan election for membership on the issuer’s board of directors or analogousgoverning body. Under what circ*mstances is this basis for exclusion applicable?

The SEC adopted amendments to Rule 14a-8 in 2010 in connection with its “proxyaccess” rulemaking. Rule 14a-11, the SEC’s proxy access rule, was vacated, but theamendments to Rule 14a-8(i)(8) recently became effective. Rule 14a-8(i)(8) has permit-ted the type of “private ordering” for proxy access through the shareholder proposalprocess that many commenters had supported in the course of the proxy access rule-making. Under Rule 14a-8(i)(8), as amended, an issuer may not exclude under this basisa shareholder proposal that would amend or request that the issuer consider amendinggoverning documents to facilitate director nominations by shareholders or disclosuresrelated to nominations made by shareholders, as long as such proposal does not conflictwith Rule 14a-11 and is not otherwise excludable under some other procedural or sub-stantive basis in Rule 14a-8. The SEC also codified some of the Staff’s historical inter-pretations of Rule 14a-8(i)(8) which permitted exclusion of a shareholder proposal thatwould: (i) seek to disqualify a nominee standing for election; (ii) remove a director fromoffice before the expiration of his or her term; (iii) question the competence, businessjudgment, or character of a nominee or director; (iv) nominate a specific individual forelection to the board of directors, other than through the Rule 14a-11 process, an appli-cable state law provision, or an issuer’s governing documents; or (v) otherwise affect theoutcome of an upcoming election of directors.

Rule 14a-8(i)(9) provides that a proposal is excludable when the proposal directlyconflicts with one of the issuer’s own proposals to be submitted to shareholders atthe same meeting. Under what circ*mstances is this basis for exclusion applicable?

An issuer may properly exclude a proposal from its proxy materials under Rule14a-8(i)(9) “if the proposal directly conflicts with one of the company’s own proposalsto be submitted to shareholders at the same meeting.” Prior to the 2015 proxy season,Rule 14a-8(i)(9) has been used to exclude shareholder proposals addressing topicssuch as compensation plan provisions, proxy access, shareholders’ ability to call aspecial meeting, and shareholders’ ability to take action by written consent. On Jan-uary 16, 2015, Chair Mary Jo White directed the SEC’s Division of CorporationFinance to review the proper scope and application of Rule 14a-8(i)(9), and the Staff

161RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (174)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

thereafter announced that it would express no view on no-action requests relating tothe exclusion of shareholder proposals in reliance on Rule 14a-8(i)(9). Without havingthe ability to seek the Staff’s concurrence to exclude a shareholder proposal based onRule 14a-8(i)(9), issuers pursued a number of alternative methods for addressingshareholder proposals that conflicted with management proposals. The most commonalternative methods were (i) including both the shareholder proposal and the manage-ment proposal in the proxy statement, with an explanation to shareholders regardingany differences in scope of applicability and recommending that shareholders vote infavor of the management proposal; and (ii) including only the shareholder proposal,and recommending that shareholders vote against that proposal.

In SLB 14H, the Staff expressed the view that there is a “direct conflict” betweena shareholder proposal and management proposal only where “a reasonable share-holder could not logically vote in favor of both proposals, i.e., a vote for one proposalis tantamount to a vote against the other proposal.” The Staff noted that this analysis“more appropriately focuses on whether a reasonable shareholder could vote favorablyon both proposals, or whether they are, in essence, mutually exclusive proposals.” Incommunicating this interpretation, the Staff focused on the principle that Rule 14a-8(i)(9) is designed to ensure that the shareholder proposal process is not used as ameans to circumvent the SEC’s proxy rules governing solicitations.

In SLB 14H, the Staff provided the following examples to provide a better under-standing of the Staff’s focus on “whether a reasonable shareholder could logically votefor both proposals.”

• Direct Conflict Exists. The Staff stated that (i) “where a company seeksshareholder approval of a merger, and a shareholder proposal asks share-holders to vote against the merger;” or (ii) “a shareholder proposal that asksfor the separation of the company’s chairman and CEO would directly con-flict with a management proposal seeking approval of a bylaw provisionrequiring the CEO to be the chair at all times,” the Staff “would agree thatthe proposals directly conflict.”

• Direct Conflict Does Not Exist. In illustrating those circ*mstances in whicha direct conflict would not exist for purposes of Rule 14a-8(i)(9), the Staffprovided the following examples: (i) “if a company does not allow share-holder nominees to be included in the company’s proxy statement, a share-holder proposal that would permit a shareholder or group of shareholders

162RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (175)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

holding at least 3% of the company’s outstanding stock for at least 3 years tonominate up to 20% of the directors would not be excludable if a manage-ment proposal would allow shareholders holding at least 5% of the compa-ny’s stock for at least 5 years to nominate for inclusion in the company’sproxy statement 10% of the directors;” and (ii) “a shareholder proposal ask-ing the compensation committee to implement a policy that equity awardswould have no less than four-year annual vesting would not directly conflictwith a management proposal to approve an incentive plan that gives thecompensation committee discretion to set the vesting provisions for equityawards.” The Staff noted that these situations would not present a “directconflict” because “a reasonable shareholder, although possibly preferringone proposal over the other, could logically vote for both.”

With respect to the proxy access example described above, the Staff stated thatthere would be no direct conflict because “both proposals generally seek a similarobjective, to give shareholders the ability to include their nominees for director along-side management’s nominees in the proxy statement, and the proposals do not presentshareholders with conflicting decisions such that a reasonable shareholder could notlogically vote in favor of both proposals.” The Staff analyzed the compensation exam-ple similarly, stating that “a reasonable shareholder could logically vote for a compen-sation plan that gives the compensation committee the discretion to determine thevesting of awards, as well as a proposal seeking implementation of a specific vestingpolicy that would apply to future awards granted under the plan.”

The Staff noted that SLB 14H could impose “a higher burden for some compa-nies seeking to exclude a proposal to meet than had been the case under our previousformulation.” As a result, issuers may turn to Rule 14a-8(i)(10) in seeking to exclude ashareholder proposal that is very similar to a management proposal or action. Rule14a-8(i)(10) provides an exclusion from an issuer’s obligation to include shareholderproposals from eligible shareholders in the issuer’s proxy statement if the issuer’sexisting policies and practices “substantially implement” the shareholder proposal.

Rule 14a-8(i)(10) provides that a proposal is excludable when the issuer has alreadysubstantially implemented the proposal. Under what circ*mstances is this basis forexclusion applicable?

Rule 14a-8(i)(10) permits an issuer to exclude a shareholder proposal from itsproxy materials if the issuer has “substantially implemented” the proposal.

163RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (176)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

Interpreting the predecessor to Rule 14a-8(i)(10), the SEC stated in ReleaseNo. 34-12598 (July 7, 1976) that the rule was “designed to avoid the possibility ofshareholders having to consider matters which have already been favorably acted uponby the management.” To be excluded, the proposal does not need to be implemented infull or exactly as presented by the proponent. Instead, the standard for exclusion issubstantial implementation. See SEC Release No. 34-40018 (May 21, 1998, note 30and accompanying text); see also SEC Release No.34-20091 (August 16, 1983).

The Staff has stated that, in determining whether a shareholder proposal has beensubstantially implemented, it will consider whether an issuer’s particular policies,practices, and procedures “compare favorably with the guidelines of the proposal,” andnot where those policies, practices, and procedures are embodied. Texaco, Inc. (March28, 1991). The Staff has provided no-action relief under Rule 14a-8(i)(10) where anissuer has satisfied the essential objective of the proposal, even if the issuer (i) did nottake the exact action requested by the proponent, (ii) did not implement the proposal inevery detail or (iii) exercised discretion in determining how to implement the proposal.See, e.g., Exelon Corp. (February 26, 2010); and Anheuser-Busch Companies, Inc.(January 17, 2007). In these cases, the Staff concurred with the issuer’s determinationthat the proposal was substantially implemented in accordance with Rule 14a-8(i)(10)when the issuer had taken actions that included modifications from what was directlycontemplated by the proposal, including in circ*mstances when the issuer had policiesand procedures in place relating to the subject matter of the proposal, or the companyhad otherwise implemented the essential objectives of the proposal.

Rule 14a-8(i)(11) provides that a proposal is excludable when the proposalsubstantially duplicates another proposal previously submitted to the issuer byanother shareholder that will be included in the issuer’s proxy materials for thesame meeting. Under what circ*mstances is this basis for exclusion applicable?

Rule 14a-8(i)(11) creates a means to ensure that only one shareholder proposalrelating to substantially the same matter is included in the company’s proxy statement.The shareholder proposal that is the first submitted is the one that is included (absentsome other basis for exclusion). In this regard, management cannot choose amongmultiple proposals. Rule 14-8(i)(11) involves three elements: (i) substantially duplica-tive proposals; (ii) the order in which such proposals were received; and (iii) theinclusion of the first-received proposal in the proxy materials. The purpose of Rule14a-8(i)(11) is to avoid shareholder confusion and to prevent various proponents fromincluding in proxy materials several versions of essentially the same proposal.

164RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (177)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

Rule 14a-8(i)(12) provides that a proposal is excludable when the proposal dealswith substantially the same subject matter as another proposal or proposals thatpreviously has or have been included in the issuer’s proxy materials within aspecified time frame and did not receive a specified percentage of the vote. Underwhat circ*mstances is this basis for exclusion applicable?

Rule 14a-8(i)(12) operates as follows:

• The issuer should look back three calendar years to see if it previouslyincluded a proposal or proposals dealing with substantially the same subjectmatter. If it has not, Rule 14a-8(i)(12) is not available as a basis to exclude aproposal from this year’s proxy materials.

• If it has, the issuer should then count the number of times that a proposal orproposals dealing with substantially the same subject matter was or wereincluded over the preceding five calendar years.

• The issuer should look at the percentage of the shareholder vote that a pro-posal dealing with substantially the same subject matter received the lasttime it was included.

Only votes for and against a proposal are included in the calculation of the share-holder vote of that proposal. Abstentions and broker non-votes are not included in thiscalculation. This basis for exclusion is not frequently utilized because the minimumprevious thresholds for support (3%, 6%, or 10%, depending on how frequently theproposal was proposed during previous five calendar years) are so low.

Rule 14a-8(i)(13) provides that a proposal is excludable when the proposal relates tospecific amounts of cash or stock dividends. Under what circ*mstances is this basisfor exclusion applicable?

The basis for exclusion in Rule 14a-8(i)(13) is viewed as a function of the boardof directors, not shareholders. For example, the Staff has allowed exclusion of ashareholder proposal seeking declaration of a dividend of 75% of earnings per share.Proposals seeking that company’s distribute specific amounts of cash or stock divi-dends have been relatively uncommon in recent years.

165RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (178)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

PROXY ACCESS

What is “proxy access” or “shareholder access”?

Under the SEC’s proxy solicitation rules, only the issuer’s director nominees areincluded in the company’s proxy statement and proxy card. If shareholders want tonominate their own candidates, then, in addition to complying with applicable statecorporation law and the issuer’s charter and bylaws, a nominating shareholder mustprepare its own proxy statement and proxy card and conduct its own proxy solicitationfor the director candidates. This is referred to as a “proxy contest.” The terms “proxyaccess” or “shareholder access” refers to an alternative approach whereby directornominees from qualifying shareholders must be included in the company’s proxystatement and on the issuer’s proxy card.

Did the Dodd-Frank Wall Act require that the SEC adopt a proxy access rule?

Section 971 of the Dodd-Frank Act provided the SEC with the authority to prom-ulgate “proxy access” rules, allowing specified shareholders to include director nomi-nees in a company’s proxy materials. The Dodd-Frank Act did not prescribe specificstandards for these rules, and the SEC had in fact proposed proxy access rules prior toenactment of the Dodd-Frank Act.

Did the SEC adopt a proxy access rule and what is the status of that rule?

The SEC issued final rules facilitating shareholder director nominations onAugust 25, 2010, and such rules were scheduled to become effective on November 15,2010. However, the effectiveness of those rules was stayed due to litigation challeng-ing the rules.

Under Rule 14a-11 as adopted by the SEC, qualifying shareholders or groupsholding at least 3% of the voting power of an issuer’s securities, who had held theirshares for at least three years, would have had the right to include director nominees inproxy materials upon meeting certain other requirements. An amendment to Rule 14a-8 provided that issuers may not exclude from their proxy materials shareholder pro-posals for less restrictive proxy access procedures.

On September 29, 2010, the Business Roundtable and Chamber of Commerce ofthe United States of America filed a petition with the United States Court of Appealsfor the District of Columbia Circuit (the “Court”) seeking judicial review of thechanges to the SEC’s proxy access rule, and on the same day filed with the SEC arequest to stay the effective date of Rule 14a-11. On October 4, 2010, the SEC granted

166RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (179)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

the request for a stay of the Rule 14a-11 and associated rules pending resolution of thepetition for review by the Court. On July 22, 2011, the Court vacated Rule 14a-11. TheCourt held that the SEC was “arbitrary and capricious” in promulgating Rule 14a-11,based principally on the SEC’s failure to adequately address the economic effects ofthe rule. The Court expressed significant concerns about the conclusions that the SECreached and the agency’s consideration of comments during the course of the rule-making. The Court did not address the First Amendment challenge to the rule that hadbeen raised by the petitioners.

On September 6, 2011, the SEC issued a statement indicating that it would not seekrehearing of the Court’s decision, nor would it seek Supreme Court review of the deci-sion; however, the Staff would continue to study the viability of a proxy access rule. Thestatement also indicated that the amendment to Rule 14a-8 referenced above would gointo effect when the Court’s mandate was finalized, which occurred on September 14,2011. As a result, the amendments to Rule 14a-8 (along with other rules adopted inconnection with Rule 14a-11) became effective on September 20, 2011, following theSEC’s publication of a notice announcing the effective date of the rule changes.

What changes did the SEC make to the shareholder proposal rule and what is thestatus of those changes?

The amendments to Rule 14a-8 that the SEC adopted in 2010, which becameeffective on September 20, 2011, have served to facilitate, the type of “private order-ing” for proxy access through the shareholder proposal process that many commentershad supported in the course of the proxy access rulemaking.

Under Rule 14a-8(i)(8), as amended, an issuer may not exclude a shareholderproposal that would amend or request that the issuer consider amending governingdocuments to facilitate director nominations by shareholders or disclosures related tonominations made by shareholders, as long as such proposal does not conflict withRule 14a-11 and is not otherwise excludable under some other procedural or sub-stantive basis in Rule 14a-8. The SEC also codified some of the Staff’s historicalinterpretations of Rule 14a-8(i)(8) which permitted exclusion of a shareholder proposalthat would: (i) seek to disqualify a nominee standing for election; (ii) remove a direc-tor from office before the expiration of his or her term; (iii) question the competence,business judgment or character of a nominee or director; (iv) nominate a specificindividual for election to the board of directors, other than through the Rule 14a-11process, an applicable state law provision, or an issuer’s governing documents; or(v) otherwise affect the outcome of an upcoming election of directors.

167RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (180)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

Are there other bases under which companies could exclude a shareholder proposalseeking to establish proxy access at a company?

While the SEC’s amendments to Rule 14a-8(i)(8) eliminated one basis to excludeproxy access shareholder proposals, there may be other options for seeking to excludeproxy access shareholder proposals. An issuer could argue (i) that the proposal is con-trary to the proxy rules under Rule 14a-8(i)(3), i.e., the resolution contained in theproposal is inherently vague or indefinite; (ii) that by adopting its own proxy accessbylaw amendment, the shareholder’s proxy access proposal has been “substantiallyimplemented” under Rule 14a-8(i)(10); (iii) the shareholder proposal directly conflictswith a similar company-sponsored proposal under Rule 14a-8(i)(9), however the Staffhas recently issued SLB No. 14H which substantially reduced the ability to rely on thisbasis for exclusion; or (iv) that another basis for exclusion specified in Rule 14a-8(i)applies, based on the specific language of the proposal and the supporting statement orthe particular circ*mstances of the company or the proponent.

Are issuers adopting a proxy access bylaw as a result of the prospect of shareholderproposals seeking to establish proxy access?

Up until the 2015 proxy season, many issuers had been taking a “wait-and-see”approach with respect to amending their bylaws to permit proxy access in order toallow greater flexibility in responding to future shareholder proposals. In November2014, the Comptroller of the City of New York, on behalf of the New York City pen-sion funds, launched a large-scale campaign for the 2015 proxy season targeting 75issuers with a proxy access shareholder proposal. The Comptroller’s office hasindicated this initiative is part of a wider effort to implement universal proxy accessthrough private ordering.

The New York City Comptroller indicated that the 75 Boardroom AccountabilityProject proposals were submitted to issuers that were selected based on three priorityissues: “climate change, board diversity, and excessive CEO pay.” Based on thatanalysis, the proposals were submitted to: (1) 33 carbon-intensive coal, oil and gas,and utility companies; (2) 24 companies with few or no women directors, and little orno apparent racial or ethnic diversity; and (3) 25 companies that received significantopposition to their 2014 say-on-pay votes. The 75 identical precatory proposals sub-mitted by the Comptroller requested that the board of directors adopt, and present forshareholder approval, a bylaw to give shareholders who meet a threshold of owning 3percent of an issuer’s shares continuously for three or more years the right to list theirdirector candidates, representing up to 25 percent of the board, in the issuer’s proxy

168RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (181)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

materials. The proposal contemplated that the nominating shareholder would providenotice to the issuer, within the time specified in the bylaws, and would provide at thattime the information required by the bylaws and the SEC’s rules about both the direc-tor nominee and the nominator. The proposal also contemplated that the nominatingshareholder would certify that (1) it will assume liability stemming from any legal orregulatory violation arising out of the nominator’s communications with the issuer’sshareholders; (2) it will comply with all applicable laws and regulations if it uses solic-iting material other than the issuer’s proxy materials; and (3) to the best of its knowl-edge, the required shares were acquired in the ordinary course of business and not tochange or influence control of the issuer.

The proposal further provided that the nominating shareholder may submit a 500-word statement in support of the director nominee. The proposal would leave to theboard the ability to adopt procedures to deal with whether submissions are timely andadequate, as well as how to prioritize multiple nominees. The proposal’s supportingstatement was very limited, noting a 2014 CFA Institute study which concluded thatproxy access would “benefit both the markets and corporate boardrooms, with littlecost or disruption” and has the potential to raise overall US market-capitalization by“up to $140.3 billion if adopted market-wide.” The supporting statement also notedthat votes for similar proposals averaged 55 percent through September 2014 and sim-ilar bylaws have been adopted by Chesapeake Energy, Hewlett Packard, WesternUnion and Verizon Communications.

During the 2015 proxy season, over 90 proxy access shareholder proposalsappeared on ballots, and as of the end of 2015, approximately 100 issuers haveadopted some form of proxy access, with much of this momentum prompted by theBoardroom Accountability Project. As the 2016 proxy season approaches, more andmore larger issuers have been considering the topic and deciding whether to imple-ment proxy access.

Most proxy access bylaw provisions adopted this year have included a 3% owner-ship threshold, a 3-year continuous holding period, a 20% nomination limit and a 20member limit on groups of nominating shareholders. Issuers and shareholders continueto debate a number of other important provisions:

• Maximum number of nominees. The Boardroom Accountability Projectshareholder proposal and Rule 14a-11 both contemplated that the maximumnumber of proxy access nominees would be 25%, but many bylaw provi-sions include 20% maximum on the percentage of the board that may be

169RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (182)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

represented by proxy access nominees. CII’s proxy access best practicesdisfavor any percentage maximum which results in less than 2 nominees.

• Nominating Shareholder Groups. Shareholder proposals submitted to issuersduring the 2015 proxy season did not usually contemplate limitations on thenumber of shareholders who could aggregate their holdings to meet mini-mum ownership requirements. Recently adopted bylaw provisions havetended to include a limitation on the aggregation by up to 20 eligible share-holders to meet the 3%-for-3 years ownership threshold.

• Treatment of Loaned Shares. Consistent with the CII’s best practices, manyproxy access bylaws include provisions which treat loaned shares as con-tinuously owned for the purposes of the 3-year ownership requirement, pro-vided that the nominating shareholder has the right to recall the loanedshares and does so as of the date of the nomination notice, when thenominating shareholder is notified that the nominees will be included in theproxy materials, or in time to vote the securities at the meeting.

• Nominee Compensation. Also consistent with CII’s best practices, manyproxy access bylaws tend to allow proxy access nominees to have some formof compensation arrangement with a third party for serving as a director ofthe issuer, provided that such compensation arrangements are disclosed.Again, these provisions appear to be bringing adopted proxy access bylawprovisions more in line with the CII’s best practices.

• Proxy Access Nominees. Issuers are taking varied approaches to incumbentproxy access nominees, as well as restrictions on the eligibility of repeatnominating shareholders. In many cases, incumbent proxy access nomineeswill continue to count against the maximum number of permitted proxyaccess nominees. Some proxy access bylaws include a restriction that wouldprevent a shareholder (or group) from nominating further proxy accessnominees for at least two or three years if that shareholder (or group) alreadyhas a proxy access nominee serving on the board. In another example ofevolving practice, a significant number of proxy access bylaw provisionswould exclude nominees who received less than a certain level of support ina prior meeting during a period of up to two years. CII’s best practicesoppose any restriction on re-nomination due to the outcome of a prior vote.

• Other Terms. Some other relevant terms include director qualifications, aprohibition on nominating other nominees by the nominating shareholder, a

170RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (183)

THE PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE

prohibition on engaging in any sort of solicitation for any other shareholdernominee, a prohibition on entering into voting commitments or entering intovoting commitments without disclosure, and a prohibition on using the issu-er’s proxy statement if the issuer receives notice that the shareholder intendsto nominate a candidate at the issuer’s annual meeting.

171RR DONNELLEY

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (184)

APPENDIX A

A-1

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (185)

COMPLIANCE CHECKLIST

SCHEDULE 14A

FOR AN ANNUAL MEETING OF STOCKHOLDERS

January 2016

This checklist is a summary of the proxy rules that are generally applicable to proxystatements for annual stockholder’ meetings. This checklist should not replace acareful review of the proxy rules and requirements, including, without limitation,Schedule 14A and Rule 14a-1 through Rule 14b-2 of the Securities Exchange Act of1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). References to Items herein are referencesto Items of Schedule 14A unless otherwise noted, and references to rules herein arereferences to rules under the Exchange Act unless otherwise noted.

Item 1. Date, Time and Place Information

• The date, time, and place of the annual meeting.

• The complete mailing address of the company’s principal offices, includ-ing the zip code.

• The approximate date on which the proxy statement and form of proxyare being sent to stockholders must appear on the first page of the proxystatement as delivered to stockholders.

• The deadline for submitting shareholder proposals for inclusion in thecompany’s proxy statement for the following year (calculated accordingto Rule 14a-8(e)).

• The date after which a notice of shareholder proposal submitted outsidethe process of Rule 14a-8 is considered untimely.

Item 2. Revocability of Proxy

State whether or not the proxies are revocable. If the right to revoke islimited in any way or subject to compliance with any formal procedures,briefly describe such limitation or procedure.

Item 3. Dissenters’ Rights of Appraisal

• Briefly outline the appraisal rights or similar rights of the dissenters withrespect to any proposal to be acted on, and indicate the procedures thatmust be followed by a stockholder, including a deadline, if any, toexercise or perfect such rights.

A-2

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (186)

• Indicate whether a stockholder’s failure to vote against a proposal willconstitute a waiver of appraisal or similar rights and whether a voteagainst a proposal will be deemed to satisfy any notice requirements.

Item 4. Persons Making the Solicitation

• State that the company (or its board of directors, on behalf of the com-pany) is soliciting the proxy.

• If any director has informed the company that he or she intends tooppose a proposal, state the name of the director and the proposal atissue.

• State who will pay the costs of solicitation.

• If proxy solicitors are to be used, disclose the material terms of theircontract, the anticipated costs, and who is paying the costs.

• If the solicitation is to be made in a manner other than through the mail,describe the methods to be used.

• If the proxy is being filed in connection with a proxy contest by a personin opposition to management’s slate, see Item 4(b) for additional dis-closure requirements.

Item 5. Interest of Certain Persons in Matters to be Acted Upon

• Briefly describe any substantial interest, direct or indirect, by securityholdings or otherwise, of each of the following persons in any matter tobe acted upon, other than elections to office:

➣ each person who has been a director or executive officer of thecompany at any time since the beginning of the last fiscal year;

➣ each nominee for election as a director of the company; and

➣ each associate of any of the foregoing persons.

Item 6. Voting Securities and Principal Holders Thereof

• For each class of voting stock entitled to vote at the meeting, state thenumber of shares outstanding and the number of votes to which eachclass is entitled.

• State the record date for the annual meeting.

A-3

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (187)

• If action is to be taken with respect to the election of directors and thestockholders have the right to cumulative voting, state the existence ofthe rights, briefly describe the rights, and state the conditions to theexercise of the rights.

• If the company has undergone a change of control since the beginning ofits last fiscal year, see Item 6(e) for required disclosure.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management(Item 403 of Reg. S-K)

The following people must be listed in this table:

• Beneficial owners of more than 5% of any class of voting securities;

• Directors and director nominees; and

• Named executive officers (as defined under Item 402(a)(3)).

The table must include columns listing the following:

• Class of security;

• Name of beneficial owner (and home or business address for 5%shareholders);

• Amount and nature of beneficial ownership;

• Percentage of class owned; and

Any arrangement known to the company, including any pledge of thecompany’s securities, which might result in a change of control must bedescribed. See Item 403(c) of Regulation S-K.

Item 7. Directors and Executive Officers

If action is to be taken with respect to the election of directors, the follow-ing information must be included for each director, executive officer,person chosen to become an executive officer and director nominee, usingtables where possible (Item 401 of Reg. S-K):

• Name and age;

• All positions and offices held with the company;

• Term of service with the company;

A-4

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (188)

• A brief description of the person’s business experience during the pastfive years, including the name and principal business of employers andwhether or not these employers are parents, subsidiaries or affiliates ofthe company;

• Other public company directorships held or held during the last 5 years;

• A brief description of any arrangement or understanding with any otherperson by which the director was selected and the identity of such otherperson;

• Any involvement in certain legal proceedings during the last 10 years,including, without limitation, bankruptcy petitions, criminal convictions,orders limiting business practices or securities law violations amongothers (see Item 401(f) of Reg. S-K);

• Any material proceedings where any directors, nominees, executive offi-cers or any of their associates is an adverse party to the company or anyof its subsidiaries (see Instruction 4 to Item 103 of Reg. S-K);

• If the company has gone public in the last year, additional disclosuremay be required for promoters or “control persons” (see Item 401(g) ofReg. S-K); and

• Briefly describe any family relationships between any director, executiveofficer, person chosen to become an executive officer or director nomi-nee.

Related Person Transactions (see Item 404 of Reg. S-K)

Describe any transaction or series of related transactions, since the begin-ning of the company’s last fiscal year, or any currently proposed trans-action, in which the company was or is to be a participant and the amountinvolved exceeds $120,000 (for smaller reporting companies, the dis-closure is required if the transaction amount exceeds the lesser of$120,000 or 1% of the company’s total assets, and transactions must bereported for the prior two years), and in which any director, executiveofficer, person chosen to become an executive officer, director nominee or5% stockholder (or family member of any of the foregoing) had or willhave a direct or indirect material interest. Such description must includethe following information regarding the transaction:

• The name of the related person and the basis on which the person is arelated person.

A-5

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (189)

• The related person’s interest in the transaction, including the relatedperson’s position(s) or relationship(s) with, or ownership in, a firm,corporation, or other entity that is a party to, or has an interest in, thetransaction.

• The approximate dollar value of the amount involved in the transaction.

• The approximate dollar value of the amount of the related person’s inter-est in the transaction, which shall be computed without regard to theamount of profit or loss.

• In the case of indebtedness, the amount involved in the transaction shallinclude the largest aggregate amount of principal outstanding during theperiod for which disclosure is provided, the amount thereof outstandingas of the latest practicable date, the amount of principal paid during theperiods for which disclosure is provided, the amount of interest paidduring the period for which disclosure is provided, and the rate oramount of interest payable on the indebtedness.

• Any other material information regarding the transaction or the relatedperson in the context of the transaction.

Review and Approval of Related Party Transactions (not required forsmaller reporting companies)

• Describe the company’s policies and procedures for the review, appro-val, or ratification of any transaction required to be reported as a relatedparty transaction, such as, among other things:

➣ The types of transactions that are covered by such policies andprocedures;

➣ The standards to be applied pursuant to such policies and proce-dures;

➣ The persons or groups of persons on the board of directors orotherwise who are responsible for applying such policies andprocedures; and

• Identify any related party transaction that was required to be reportedsince the beginning of the company’s last fiscal year where such policiesand procedures did not require review, approval or ratification or wheresuch policies and procedures were not followed.

A-6

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (190)

Compliance with Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act

• Identify any person required to file reports under Section 16 of theExchange Act that failed to timely file a report under Section 16 duringthe last fiscal year, including:

➣ The number of late reports;

➣ The number of transactions that were not timely reported; and

➣ Any known failure to file a required report.

Corporate Governance

• Director Independence (see Item 407(a) of Regulation S-K)

➣ Identify each director and nominee for director that isindependent under applicable listing standards (if the company isnot listed on an exchange, the definition of independence for anynational securities exchange may be used, but the definition usedshould be noted);

➣ State the total number of board meetings that took place duringthe last fiscal year;

➣ Name each director who attended less than 75% of the aggregateof (i) the total number of board meetings and (ii) the total numberof meetings of committees on which he or she served; and

➣ Describe the company’s policy, if any, with respect to boardmember attendance at annual stockholders’ meetings.

• State whether or not the company has the following committees;

➣ Audit committee;

➣ Compensation committee; and

➣ Nominating committee.

• For each of these committees:

➣ Describe briefly the functions performed by the committee;

➣ Identify each committee member, and whether each member isindependent under applicable listing standards and heightenedstandards for audit committee members, if applicable;

A-7

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (191)

➣ State whether the committee has a charter, and if so, whether itcan be found on the company’s website or is otherwise available;

➣ State the number of committee meetings held during the last fis-cal year; and

➣ List the members of the audit committee that qualify as an “auditcommittee financial expert,” (as defined in Item 407(d)(5) ofRegulation S-K).

Nominating Committee (see Item 407(c) of Regulation S-K)

• If the company does not have a nominating committee, state the basis forthe board’s view that it does not need one, and identify each director whoparticipates in the consideration of director nominees.

• If the company has a policy concerning shareholder nominees for direc-tor, discuss the material terms of such policy, and the procedures forshareholders who want to nominate a director; if the company has nosuch policy, state the basis for the board’s view that it does not need one.

• Describe the nominating committee’s procedures for identifying andevaluating director nominees, and any differences in procedures withrespect to shareholder nominees, including any minimum qualificationsfor serving on the board and how the nominating committee considersdiversity in evaluating nominees.

• With regard to each nominee for director (other than current directors orexecutive officers), disclose the source of the nomination: stockholder,director, CEO, other executive officer, third party search firm, or othersource.

• Disclose any fees paid to a third-party search firm.

• If the nominating committee received a shareholder nomination from astockholder or group of stockholders holding in the aggregate 5% ofmore of the company’s outstanding stock, disclose that fact.

Audit Committee Requirements (see Item 407(d) of Regulation S-K)

Include an Audit Committee Report, stating:

➣ Whether the audit committee has reviewed and discussed theaudited financials with management;

A-8

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (192)

➣ Whether the audit committee has discussed with the auditors thematters required to be discussed by Auditing Standard No. 16 asadopted by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board[which replaced SAS 61 (Codification of Statements of AuditingStandards, AU § 380), as adopted by the Public CompanyAccounting Oversight Board in Rule 3200T];

➣ Whether the audit committee has received the requiredindependence-of-auditor letter from the accountants and has haddiscussions with the accountants regarding their independence;

➣ Whether the audit committee has recommended to the Board thatthe audited financials be included in the company’s 10-K; and

➣ The name of each member of the audit committee must be setforth below the report.

Compensation Committee

• Describe the committee’s processes and procedures for determiningexecutive compensation, including:

➣ The scope of authority of the compensation committee (or per-sons performing the equivalent functions);

➣ The extent to which the compensation committee may delegateany authority, specifying what authority may be so delegated andto whom;

➣ The role of executive officers in determining or recommendingthe amount or form of executive and director compensation; and

➣ The role of compensation consultants in determining or recom-mending the amount or form of executive and director compensa-tion.

• The fees paid to any compensation consultant used by the compensationcommittee, if the company paid such consultant fees in excess of$120,000 during the last fiscal year for services other than consulting onexecutive compensation.

• With regard to any compensation consultant identified in response toItem 407(e)(3)(iii) whose work has raised any conflict of interest, dis-close the nature of the conflict and how the conflict is being addressed.

A-9

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (193)

• Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation (seeItem 407(e)(4) of Regulation S-K – must be separately captioned)

➣ Identify each person who served on the compensation committeeduring the last fiscal year who was an employee of the companyduring the last fiscal year, was ever an officer of the company, orhad a relationship during the last fiscal year requiring disclosureunder Item 404(a) of Regulation S-K, describing such relation-ship.

➣ If an executive officer of the company served as a director (or onthe compensation committee) of another entity during the pastyear, and an executive officer of the other entity serves on thecompany’s board or compensation committee, identify the direc-tors and describe the relationships.

• Compensation Committee Report (see Item 407(e)(5) of Regulation S-K– must be separately captioned)

➣ State that the compensation committee has reviewed the CD&Aand recommended it for inclusion in the Form 10-K.

➣ The name of each compensation committee member must be setforth below the report.

Shareholder Communications (see Item 407(b) and (f) of Regulation S-K)

• Describe the manner in which stockholders may send communications tomembers of the board.

• If company does not have a process for stockholders to communicate withthe board, explain why.

• If all security holder communications are not sent directly to board members,describe the company’s process for determining which communications willbe relayed to board members.

Board Leadership and Role in Risk Oversight (see Item 407(h) ofRegulation S-K)

• Disclose whether the same person serves as CEO and board chairman.

• Describe why the company has chosen to combine or separate the CEOand board chairman positions, as well as the reasons why the company

A-10

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (194)

believes that this board leadership structure is the most appropriate struc-ture for the company at the time of the applicable filing.

• Where there is a combined CEO and board chairman but also a leadindependent director, disclose whether and why the company has a leadindependent director and the specific role that the lead independentdirector plays in the leadership of the company.

• Disclose the extent of the board’s role in risk oversight.

➣ Disclose the effect that the board’s role in the oversight of riskhas on the leadership structure.

Item 8. Compensation of Directors and Executive Officers

Furnish the following information if action is to be taken with respect to(a) the election of directors; or (b) any compensation plans in whichexecutive officers or directors participate.

The compensation disclosure required by Item 8 is extensive and detailed.A high level summary of the requirements is below, however we stronglyadvise you to consult Item 402 of Regulation S-K for the specific dis-closure requirements (smaller reporting companies and emerging growthcompanies have scaled reporting requirements which are set forth in Items402(l) – (r)).

• Compensation Discussion and Analysis

➣ Objectives of the company’s compensation program;

➣ What the compensation program is designed to reward;

➣ Each element of compensation;

➣ Why the company chooses to pay each element;

➣ How the company determines the amount (and, where applicable,the formula) for each element;

➣ How each element and the company’s decisions regarding thatelement fits into the overall compensation objectives and affectsdecisions regarding other elements; and

➣ Whether, and if so, how, the company has considered the resultsof the most recent shareholder advisory vote on executive com-pensation (as required by Section 14A of the Exchange Act or

A-11

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (195)

Exchange Act Rule 14a-20) in determining compensation poli-cies and decisions and, if so, how that consideration has affectedthe company’s compensation decisions and policies.

• Summary Compensation Table

• Grants of Plan-Based Awards Table

• Narrative Disclosure to the Summary Compensation Table and theGrants of Plan-Based Awards Table – Describe material factors neces-sary to understand tables, including:

➣ Material terms of each named executive officer’s employmentarrangements, whether written or unwritten;

➣ Material modifications to options or other equity-based awards,including repricings;

➣ Material terms of any plan-based award disclosed in the tables,including formulas to be applied in determining amounts andvesting schedules; and

➣ An explanation of the amount of salary and bonus in proportionto total compensation.

• Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year-End Table

• Option Exercises and Stock Vested Table

• Pension Benefits Table

• Nonqualified Deferred Compensation Table

• Potential Payments Upon Termination or Change in Control

➣ Describe and explain the specific circ*mstances that would trig-ger payments or other benefits, including perquisites and health-care benefits;

➣ Describe and quantify estimated payments and benefits;

➣ Describe how payment and benefit levels are determined undervarious circ*mstances;

➣ Describe material obligations or conditions to receipt of pay-ments or benefits, e.g., non-compete, non-solicitation or non-disparagement agreements; and

➣ Any other material factors.

A-12

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (196)

• Director Compensation Table

• Narrative to Director Compensation Table – Describe material factorsnecessary to understand the table, including:

➣ A description of standard compensation arrangements (such asfees for retainer, committee service, service as chairman of theboard or a committee, and meeting attendance); and

➣ Whether any director has a different compensation arrangement,identifying that director and describing the terms of thatarrangement.

• Narrative of the Company’s Compensation Policies and Practices as theyRelate to Risk Management

➣ If risks arising from the company’s compensation policies andpractices for its employees are reasonably likely to have amaterial adverse effect on the company, disclose the company’spolicies and practices of compensating its employees, includingnon-executive officers, as they relate to risk management practi-ces and risk-taking incentives.

Item 9. Independent Public Accountants.

• If the meeting involves (1) election of directors or (2) approval or rat-ification of the company’s accountant, include the following:

➣ The name of the accountant selected or being recommended forapproval or ratification;

➣ The name of the accountant for the last fiscal year if differentfrom the accountant being recommended for approval or rat-ification, or if no accountant is being named for the current year;

➣ Whether or not representatives of the accountant will be presentat the annual meeting;

➣ Whether or not the representatives of the accountant will have theopportunity to make a statement at the meeting if they desire todo so; and

➣ Whether or not the representatives of the accountant will be avail-able at the meeting to answer questions.

• If the accountant has changed during the last two years, additional dis-closure may be required under Item 9(d).

A-13

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (197)

Accountant Fee Disclosure (see Item 9(e))

• Under the caption “Audit Fees” list the aggregate fees billed by theaccountant for the preparation of the annual financials for each of the lasttwo fiscal years and the financials included in the company’s 10-Qs forthose fiscal years.

• Under the caption “Audit-Related Fees” list the aggregate fees billed foreach of the last two fiscal years for assurance and related services by theaccountant that are reasonably related to the audit or review of thecompany’s financial statements and are not reported as “Audit Fees.”

• Under the caption “Tax Fees” list the aggregate fees billed for each ofthe last two fiscal years for professional services rendered by theaccountant for tax compliance, tax advice, and tax planning and describethe nature of the services provided.

• Under the caption “All Other Fees” list the aggregate fees billed for eachof the last two fiscal years by the accountant for all other services nototherwise described and identify the nature of the services provided.

• Describe the audit committee’s pre-approval policies and procedures.

• Describe the percentage of services other than Audit Fees that wereapproved by the audit committee pursuant to the “de minimis” exceptionin Regulation S-X Rule 2.01(c)(7)(1)(C).

• If more than 50% of the audit work was performed by persons other thanthe accountant’s full-time employees, list the percentage of work doneby these people.

Item 10. Compensation Plans.

If any action is to be taken with regard to any compensation plan (cash ornoncash) provide the information listed below. If a plan is being amended,provide the information for the amended plan and note any materialdifferences from the existing plan.

• Briefly describe the material features of the plan being acted on, includ-ing (i) each class of persons that will be entitled to participate, (ii) theapproximate number of people in each class and (iii) the basis for partic-ipation.

A-14

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (198)

• Using the form of table specified in Item 10(a)(2)(i), disclose the benefitsor amounts under the plan that will be received by or allocated to, subjectto shareholder approval, each of the following:

➣ Each named executive officer;

➣ All current executive officers as a group;

➣ All current directors who are not executive officers as a group;and

➣ All employees, including all current officers who are not execu-tive officers, as a group.

• If the plan grants options or warrants disclose:

➣ The title and amount of securities underlying the options or war-rants;

➣ The price, expiration date and other material conditions forexercising the options or warrants;

➣ The consideration received or to be received by the company ongrant of the options or warrants;

➣ The market value of the securities underlying the options orwarrants as of the latest practicable date; and

➣ In the case of options, the federal income tax consequences of theissuance and exercise of the options for the recipient and thecompany.

• The options received or to be received by the following people must belisted separately:

➣ Each named executive officer;

➣ All current executive officers as a group;

➣ All current directors who are not executive officers as a group;

➣ Each nominee for director;

➣ Each associate of any such director, executive officer or nominee;

A-15

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (199)

➣ Each other person who will receive 5% of the options under theplan; and

➣ All employees, including all current officers who are not execu-tive officers, as a group.

• If the plan is a written, it must be filed as an appendix to the proxy state-ment in the SEC filing. See Instruction 3 to Item 10. The plan does notneed to be included in the printed version of the proxy statement sent tostockholders.

• Equity Compensation Plan Table (Item 10(c) of Schedule 14A andItem 201(d) of Regulation S-K)

Item 21. Voting Procedures.

As to each matter which is to be submitted to a vote of security holders,furnish the following information:

• The vote required for approval or election, other than for the approval ofauditors.

• The method by which votes will be counted, including the treatment andeffect of abstentions and broker non-votes under applicable state law aswell as the company’s organizational documents.

• Items 11 through 20 of Schedule 14A set forth disclosure requirementsapplicable when action is being taken with respect to specific matterssuch as issuance of securities, modification or exchange of securities,mergers, consolidations or similar matters, restatement of accounts andamendment of charter or bylaws among other matters. Please refer toItems 11 through Item 20 to determine whether those requirements areapplicable to your particular circ*mstances.

Item 23. Delivery of Documents to Security Holders Sharing an Address.

If one annual report, proxy statement or notice of availability of proxymaterials is being delivered to multiple stockholders at the same address:

• State that only one annual report, proxy statement or notice of internetavailability of proxy materials, as applicable, is being delivered to multi-ple security holders sharing an address unless the company has receivedcontrary instructions from one of the security holders.

A-16

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (200)

• Promptly deliver a separate copy of the applicable materials, ifrequested.

• Provide a phone number and mailing address for stockholders to contactif they wish to receive a separate copy of such materials in the future.

• Provide instructions on how stockholders can request delivery of a singlecopy if they are receiving multiple copies.

• Provide instructions on how a stockholder can request separate copies inthe future.

Item 24. Shareholder Approval of Executive Compensation (Item 24 does not apply toemerging growth companies).

Companies that are required to provide any of the separate shareholdervotes pursuant to Exchange Act Rule 14a-21 shall disclose:

• That they are providing such vote as required pursuant to Section 14A ofthe Exchange Act;

• A brief explanation of the general effect of each vote, such as whethereach such vote is non-binding;

• Where applicable, the current frequency of advisory votes on executivecompensation as required by Exchange Act Rule 14a-21(a) and when thenext such shareholder advisory vote will occur.

A-17

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (201)

APPENDIX B

B-1

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (202)

CONFIDENTIAL

[INSERT COMPANY NAME]DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS QUESTIONNAIRE

DATE:NAME:

This Questionnaire is being furnished to you to obtain information to prepare andfile [the Proxy1 Statement and an Annual Report on Form 10-K (collectively, the“Annual Report”) of [Insert Company Name] (the “Company”) with the Secu-rities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) covering the fiscal year ended[Insert Date of Last Fiscal Year End] (“Fiscal Year [Insert Last Fiscal Year]”)]for [Insert Company Name] (the “Company”)]. The Questionnaire will also assistthe Company’s board of directors in assessing each of its members’ independence (asdefined by the SEC and [Nasdaq] [the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”)]).As used in this Questionnaire, the term “Company” includes any affiliate of theCompany, [including [Insert Applicable Entities]]. “You” also refers to any entity onwhose behalf you are responding. Certain terms are italicized, and definitions of thoseterms are provided at the end of the Questionnaire.

Important Note: Please note several of the questions contained in this Ques-tionnaire have changed from prior years as a result of recent SEC rule changes,including changes requiring additional disclosure related to your professionalbackground and compensation.

Unless otherwise directed, please answer every question. If the Company hascompleted portions of the Questionnaire on your behalf, please confirm the accu-racy of that information. If your answer to a question is “None” or “Not Applicable,”please so state. If you do not provide an answer to a question, the Company willassume the answer is “None” or “No,” as applicable. Unless otherwise stated, youranswers should be given as of the date you sign the Questionnaire. Please note thatcertain questions are necessarily broad in scope, so if you have doubts regardingwhether something should be included in your response please err on the side of over-inclusion. The Company may have additional follow-up questions for you in con-nection with preparing the Annual Report. It is important that you review the draft(s)of the Annual Report that are presented to you to confirm that the information aboutyou is accurate.

1 If preparing for Schedule 14C, replace “Proxy” with “Information.”

B-2

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (203)

Once you have completed the Questionnaire, please sign it to indicate: (i) yourconsent for the Company to use the information provided in its Annual Report;(ii) your acknowledgment that material misstatements or omissions in the AnnualReport may give rise to civil and criminal liabilities to the Company, each officer anddirector of the Company signing the Annual Report, the officers providing certifi-cations pursuant to Sections 302 and 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, and other personsassociated with the preparation and filing of the Annual Report; (iii) your agreement tonotify the Company of any misstatement of a material fact in the Annual Report, andof the omission of any material fact necessary to make the statements contained in theAnnual Report not misleading, promptly after you become aware of any suchmisstatement or omission; (iv) your agreement to promptly notify the Company of anychanges in information provided in the Questionnaire occurring after the date you signthe Questionnaire; and (v) your confirmation that the information contained in theQuestionnaire is true and correct, to the best of your knowledge and belief after a rea-sonable investigation, as of the date you sign the Questionnaire.

Please complete the Questionnaire and return it, along with a copy of your currentresume, by [Insert date—should allow at least two weeks]. Please return the com-pleted Questionnaire by overnight delivery to [Insert Address], Attention: [InsertContact]. If you have any questions with respect to these matters, please call [InsertContact Name] at [Insert Telephone Number].

THE EXISTENCE AND CONTENTS OF THE QUESTIONNAIRE, ASWELL AS YOUR ANSWERS AND ALL NOTES AND DRAFTS PREPAREDBY YOU, ARE CONSIDERED EXTREMELY CONFIDENTIAL ANDPROPRIETARY BY THE COMPANY AND SHOULD BE TREATEDACCORDINGLY.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

QUESTION 1. Name, Birth Date, Address and Telephone Number2

(a) Your full name (as it should appear in the Company’s Annual Report):

(b) Please provide all previous, assumed or fictitious names or aliases:

2 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 401(a), (b) (c) andinstruction thereto.

B-3

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (204)

(c) Your birth date:

Business Address: Home Address:

Business Telephone: ( ) Home Telephone: ( )

E-Mail Address:

QUESTION 2. Arrangement for Selection

Is there any arrangement between you and any other person(s) pursuant to whichyou were or are to be selected as a director, nominee for directorship, or officer?3

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If your answer is “YES,” please describe:

QUESTION 3. Family Relationships

(a) Is there any “family relationship” between you and any director, executiveofficer, or person nominated or chosen to become a director or executive officer of theCompany?4 The term “family relationship” means any relationship by blood, marriageor adoption not more remote than first cousin.

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If your answer is “YES,” please describe:

3 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 401(a), (b) and instructionthereto.

4 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 401(d) and instructionthereto.

B-4

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (205)

(b) Are any of your family members employed by the Company or any of its affili-ates, or do any of your family members otherwise have business or other relationshipswith the Company or any of its affiliates? To your knowledge, does any group orentity with which any of your family members are affiliated have any business or otherrelationships with the Company or any of its affiliates?

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If your answer is “YES,” please describe:

QUESTION 4. Business Experience

(a) Please describe your business experience during the past five (5) years in thetable below (please attach additional pages as necessary), and note whether youremployer was an affiliate of the Company.5 (You may refer to your attached resume ifit provides the requested information.)

Time Period(Month/Year)From: To:

PrincipalOccupation

Position orOffice

Name andPrincipal

Business ofEmployer

Nature ofResponsibilities

Affiliateof the

Company?

‘ YES‘ NO

‘ YES‘ NO

‘ YES‘ NO

‘ YES‘ NO

‘ YES‘ NO

5 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 401(e)(1) and instructionthereto.

B-5

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (206)

(b) Please list in the table below all positions and offices (including board of direc-tors memberships) that you have held with the Company and/or any subsidiary duringthe past five (5) years (including your present position(s)), and the time periods inwhich you have held those positions or offices.6 (You may refer to your attachedresume to the extent that it provides the requested information.)

Positions/OfficesHeld

Time Period(Month and Year)

From: To:

QUESTION 5. Directorships

Have you served as a director of any entity besides the Company at any time inthe past five years, or have you been selected to serve in the future as a director of anysuch entity?7

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If your answer is “YES,” please list in the following table the name of each suchentity, the positions (including committee memberships) you have held or have beenselected to hold, your dates of service, and indicate if the applicable entity is a publiccompany or a registered investment company.

Entity

Positionsand/orBoard

Committees

Dates of Service(Month and Year)

Public Company/Registered

Investment CompanyFrom: To:

‘ YES ‘ NO

‘ YES ‘ NO

‘ YES ‘ NO

‘ YES ‘ NO

6 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 401(e)(1) and instructionthereto.

7 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 401(e)(2) and instructionthereto.

B-6

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (207)

QUESTION 6. Educational [and Other] Background8

(a) Please complete the following table regarding your educational background.(You may refer to your attached resume if it provides the requested information.)

Name and Address ofCollege, University orProfessional School

Attended

Dates of Attendance(Month and Year)

Area ofStudy

(Major)Degree

ReceivedFrom: To:

(b) [If you are a director, aside from any information provided in Questions 4through 6(a), above, please describe any specific experiences, qualifications or skillsthat qualify you to serve as a director.9 Such information may include informationabout your risk assessment skills or any particular area of expertise. (You may refer toyour attached resume if it provides the requested information.)]10

QUESTION 7. Involvement in Legal and Regulatory Proceedings

Have any of the following events occurred during the past [ten (10)]11 years?When computing the ten-year period, the date of an event should be the date on whichthe final order, judgment or decree was entered, or the date on which any rights of

8 Consider attaching the prior year’s disclosure for each recipient regarding background and includingspace for the recipient to update any changes.

9 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 401(e)(1) and instructionthereto.

10 Note, this information is required disclosure; however, consider whether or not this question shouldbe included in the Questionnaire or left to the Company and/or the nominating committee to addressthrough enhanced disclosure based on the background information otherwise obtained from directors inQuestions 4, 5 and 6(a). If this question is not included in the Questionnaire, please ensure that the appro-priate person at the Company is made aware of this disclosure requirement.

11 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 401(f) and instructionsthereto. See also Cal. Corp. Code § 1502.1(a)(6), (7) and § 2117.1(a)(6), (7). The ten year time period isrequired disclosure; however, to the extent that this Questionnaire is being used for a registration state-ment, consider removing the time limitation in an effort to elicit more expansive disclosure.

B-7

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (208)

appeal from preliminary orders, judgments, or decrees lapsed. Regarding bankruptcypetitions, the date should be the date of filing for uncontested petitions or the dateupon which approval of a contested petition became final. If your answer is “YES” toany of these questions, or if you are in doubt as to whether a question applies to a par-ticular proceeding, please provide details on a separate sheet and attach it to the Ques-tionnaire.12

(a) Was a petition under the federal bankruptcy laws or any state insolvency lawfiled by or against, or a receiver, fiscal agent or similar officer appointed by a court forthe business or property of: (i) you, (ii) any partnership in which you were a generalpartner within two (2) years before the time of the filing, or (iii) any corporation orbusiness association of which you were an executive officer at or within two (2) yearsbefore the time of the filing?13

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(b) Were you convicted in a criminal proceeding, or are you the named subject ina criminal proceeding that is presently pending (other than traffic violations and otherminor offenses), including, but not limited to, any felony or misdemeanor (i) in con-nection with the purchase or sale of any security; (ii) involving the making of any falsefiling with the SEC, or (iii) arising out of the conduct of the business of an under-writer, broker, dealer, municipal securities dealer, investment advisor or paid solicitorof purchasers of securities?14

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(c) Were you the subject of any court order, judgment or decree, not subsequentlyreversed, suspended or vacated, which permanently or temporarily enjoined you orotherwise limited you from any of the following activities:15

(i) Acting as a futures commission merchant, introducing broker, commoditytrading adviser, commodity pool operator, floor broker, leverage transaction merchant,any other person regulated by the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission, oran associated person of any of the foregoing; or as an investment adviser, underwriter,

12 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 401(f) and instructionsthereto.

13 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 401(f)(1) and instructionsthereto.

14 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 401(f)(2) and instructionsthereto. Additionally, see Rule 506(d)(1)(i) of Regulation D.

15 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 401(f)(3) and instructionsthereto.

B-8

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (209)

broker or dealer in securities, or as an affiliated person of any of the foregoing; or as adirector or employee of any investment company, bank, savings and loan associationor insurance company; or engaging in or continuing any conduct or practice in con-nection with such activity?16

(ii) Engaging in any type of business practice?17

(iii) Engaging in any activity in connection with the purchase or sale of anysecurity or commodity or in connection with any violation of federal or state securitieslaws or federal commodities laws?18

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(d) Were you the subject of any order, judgment or decree, not subsequentlyreversed, suspended or vacated, or any professional disciplinary proceeding, of anyfederal or state authority barring, suspending or otherwise limiting for more than sixty(60) days your right to engage in any of the activities described above or your right tobe associated with persons engaged in any such activities?19

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(e) Were you found by a court of competent jurisdiction in a civil action or by theSEC to have violated any federal or state securities law where the judgment or findinghas not subsequently been reversed, suspended or vacated?20

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(f) Were you found by a court of competent jurisdiction or by the U.S. Commod-ity Futures Trading Commission to have violated any federal commodities law wherethe judgment or finding has not been subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated?21

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

16 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 401(f)(3)(i).17 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 401(f)(3)(ii).18 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 401(f)(3)(iii).19 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 401(f)(4) and instructions

thereto.20 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 401(f)(5) and instructions

thereto.21 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 401(f)(6) and instructions

thereto.

B-9

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (210)

(g) Other than in connection with the settlement of a civil proceeding amongprivate litigants, were you the subject of, or a party to, any federal or state judicial oradministrative order, judgment, decree, or finding, not subsequently reversed, sus-pended or vacated, relating to any of the following?

(i) An alleged violation of any federal or state securities or commodities law orregulation?22

(ii) An alleged violation of any law or regulation respecting financialinstitutions or insurance companies including, but not limited to, a temporary orpermanent injunction, order of disgorgement or restitution, civil money penalty ortemporary or permanent cease-and-desist order, or removal or prohibition order?23

(iii) An alleged violation of any law or regulation prohibiting mail or wirefraud or fraud in connection with any business entity?24

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(h) Were you the subject of, or a party to, any sanction or order, not subsequentlyreversed, suspended or vacated, of any self-regulatory organization, any registeredentity, or any equivalent exchange, association, entity or organization that has dis-ciplinary authority over its members or persons associated with a member?25

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(i) Were you convicted of fraud?26

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(j) Were you named as a defendant in any action, or have you been the subject ofan action instituted by the SEC, in which it was alleged that you violated any securitieslaw, engaged in any fraudulent conduct, or violated any fiduciary obligations such asthat of an officer, director, trustee or partner of a corporation, trust or partnership?

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

22 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 401(f)(7)(i).23 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 401(f)(7)(ii).24 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 401(f)(7)(iii).25 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 401(f)(8). Self-regulatory

organization is defined by 15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(26); registered entity is defined by 7 U.S.C. 1(a)(29).26 To the extent that the Company is required to file Form SI-PT in California, the Questionnaire should

include this question regarding fraud convictions. Note reference change from to fn 11.

B-10

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (211)

(k) Have you ever been: (i) suspended or barred from being associated with anissuer or public accounting firm; or (ii) suspended or barred from appearing or practic-ing before the SEC?27

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(l) Are you subject to any order, judgment or decree entered into within the pastfive years that restrains or enjoins you from engaging or continuing to engage in anyconduct or practice: (i) in connection with the purchase or sale of any security,(ii) involving the making of any false filing with the SEC; or (iii) arising out of theconduct of the business of an underwriter, broker, dealer or municipal securitiesdealer, investment advisor or paid solicitor of purchasers of securities?28

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(m) Are you subject to a final order from any of the following entities that baryou from (i) associating with such entity; (ii) engaging in the business of securities,insurance or banking; or (iii) engaging in savings association or credit union activities?Was a final order entered against you within the past ten years by any of these entitiesthat prohibit fraudulent, manipulative or deceptive conduct?29

(i) State securities commissions;

(ii) State authorities that supervise or examines banks, savings associations orcredit unions;

(iii) State insurance commissions;

(iv) Federal banking agencies;

(v) The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission; or

(vi) The National Credit Union Administration?

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(n) Are you subject to an order of the SEC entered pursuant to Section 15(b) or15B(c) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”) or Section 203(e)or (f) of the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 that (i) suspends or revokes your

27 15 U.S.C. § 7215(c)(7)(B) (Sarbanes-Oxley Act § 105(c)(7)(B)).28 See Rule 506(d)(1)(ii) of Regulation D (to be included if the company anticipates relying on Rule

506 of Regulation D).29 See Rule 506(d)(1)(iii) of Regulation D (to be included if the company anticipates relying on Rule

506 of Regulation D).

B-11

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (212)

registration as a broker, dealer, municipal securities dealer or investment adviser;(ii) places limitations on your activities, functions or operations; or (iii) bars you frombeing associated with any entity or from participating in the offering of any pennystock?30

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(o) Are you subject to any order of the SEC entered within five years that ordersyou to cease and desist from committing or causing a violation or future violation of(i) any scienter-based anti-fraud provision of the federal securities laws, includingwithout limitation Section 17(a)(1) of the Securities Act of 1933 (the “Securities Act”),Section 10(b) of the Exchange Act and Rule10b-5, Section 15(c)(1) of the ExchangeAct and Section 206(1) of the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, or any other rule orregulation thereunder; or (ii) Section 5 of the Securities Act?31

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(p) Have you ever been suspended or expelled from membership in, or suspendedor barred from association with a member of, a registered national securities exchangeor a registered national or affiliated securities association for any act or omission to actconstituting conduct inconsistent with just and equitable principles of trade?32

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(q) Are you the subject of an investigation or proceeding to determine whether astop order or suspension order should be issued in connection with any registrationstatement or Regulation A offering statement filed with the SEC33

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

30 See Rule 506(d)(1)(iv) of Regulation D (to be included if the company anticipates relying on Rule506 of Regulation D).

31 See Rule 506(d)(1)(v) of Regulation D (to be included if the company anticipates relying on Rule506 of Regulation D).

32 See Rule 506(d)(1)(vi) of Regulation D (to be included if the company anticipates relying on Rule506 of Regulation D).

33 See Rule 506(d)(1)(vii) of Regulation D (to be included if the company anticipates relying on Rule506 of Regulation D).

B-12

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (213)

(r) Have you filed (as a registrant or issuer), or were or were named as an under-writer in, any registration statement or Regulation A offering statement filed with theSEC that, within the past five years, was the subject of a refusal order, stop order, ororder suspending the Regulation A exemption?34

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(s) Have you been subject to a United States Postal Service false representationorder during the past five years?35

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(t) Are you subject to a temporary restraining order or preliminary injunction withrespect to conduct alleged by the United States Postal Service to constitute a scheme ordevice for obtaining money or property through the mail by means of false representa-tions?36

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

QUESTION 8. [Promoters and Control Persons]37

To your knowledge, has one or more of the events listed in (a) through (f) inQuestion 8 occurred to any promoter or control person of the Company during thesame period referred to in Question 8?38

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

34 See Rule 506(d)(1)(vii) of Regulation D (to be included if the company anticipates relying on Rule506 of Regulation D).

35 See Rule 506(d)(1)(viii) of Regulation D (to be included if the company anticipates relying on Rule506 of Regulation D).

36 See Rule 506(d)(1)(viii) of Regulation D (to be included if the company anticipates relying on Rule506 of Regulation D).

37 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 401(g) and instructionsthereto. This question only needs to be included if the Company has not been subject to the reportingrequirements of Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act for the 12 months immediately prior to thefiling of the document to which this item is applicable, and if the Company had a promoter at any timeduring the past five fiscal years per Item 401(g) of Regulation S-K.

38 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 401(g).

B-13

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (214)

OFFICER COMPENSATION AND RELATED MATTERS

Note: Questions 10 through 19 should be completed by (i) all executive officersof the Company, (ii) anyone who served as the Company’s principal executive officer(or acted in a similar capacity) at any time during Fiscal Year [Insert Last FiscalYear], and (iii) anyone who served as the Company’s principal financial officer (oracted in a similar capacity) at any time during Fiscal Year [Insert Last Fiscal Year].39

QUESTION 9. Salary; Bonus; Earnings Under Non-Equity Incentive Plans(Officers Only)40

Please indicate in the table below the dollar value of the base salary (cash andnon-cash) and any bonus (cash and non-cash) you earned from the Company or any ofits affiliates during Fiscal Year [Insert Last Fiscal Year], whether or not you electedto forego any portion of such base salary or bonus amounts. If any amount of yoursalary or bonus earned is not presently calculable please so indicate in the table.41

If you elected to forego any portion of your salary or bonus and instead receivestock, equity-based or other forms of non-cash compensation from the Company,please describe such election below the table.42 Do not include the amount of salary orbonus taken instead as non-cash compensation in the “Salary” and “Bonus” columnsbelow, but instead note those amounts in your description of the election.43

Please also indicate in the table below the dollar value of all earnings for servicesperformed during Fiscal Year [Insert Last Fiscal Year] pursuant to awards under Non-Equity Incentive Plans and all earnings on any outstanding awards under those

39 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(a)(3). Please note thatcompensation disclosure under Item 402 of Regulation S-K is also required for up to two additionalindividuals for whom disclosure would have been required but for the fact that the individual was notserving as an executive officer of the registrant at the end of the last completed fiscal year – i.e., someonewho was hired as or promoted to an executive officer position after the end of the last fiscal year or wasterminated from an executive officer position prior to the end of the last fiscal year. See Regulation S-K,Item 402(a)(3)(iv). The Company will likely be required to rely on its own records for any such additionalperson who was terminated. Any new hires should be picked up by the “all executive officers” note in theintroduction to the Compensation section of the Questionnaire.

40 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(a) and (b)(2)(ii), (iii)(A)and (B) and instructions thereto.

41 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Instruction 1 to Item 402(c)(2)(iii)and (iv).

42 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Instruction 2 to Item 402(c)(2)(iii)and (iv).

43 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Instruction 2 to Item 402(c)(2)(iii)and (iv).

B-14

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (215)

plans.44(Please note that a “Non-Equity Incentive Plan” includes plans that are commonlythought of as “bonus” plans but that are designed to provide cash incentive for perform-ance to occur over a specified period of time, e.g., a management incentive plan or bonusplan where cash payouts are dependent on the satisfaction of financial or other targets.)

If the relevant performance measure(s) under a Non-Equity Incentive Plan weresatisfied during Fiscal Year [Insert Last Fiscal Year] (including for a single year in aplan with a multi-year performance measure), you should report the earnings in thetable below (even if they are not payable until a later date) and note the payment termsbelow the table.45 All earnings under Non-Equity Incentive Plans during Fiscal Year[Insert Last Fiscal Year] should be reported, whether the earnings were paid duringthe fiscal year, payable during the period but deferred at your election, or payable bytheir terms at a later date.46

Fiscal Year Salary BonusNon-Equity

Incentive Plans

[Insert Last Fiscal Year]

44 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(c)(2)(vii).45 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Instruction 1 to Item 402(c)(2)(vii).46 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Instruction 2 to Item 402(c)(2)(vii).

B-15

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (216)

QUESTION 10. Stock and Option/SAR Awards (Officers Only)

(a) Please indicate in the table below all awards of stock (including restrictedstock) that were granted to you during Fiscal Year [Insert Last Fiscal Year], includ-ing the date the particular grant was made, the number of shares subject to the award,the vesting period, forfeiture terms, and/or performance, market or other conditions (ifapplicable) of the award and any consideration you paid for the shares.47 Pleaseinclude and note any stock granted in lieu of cash compensation payments and indicatethe amount of compensation foregone.48 If any of the stock you were granted was notcommon stock, please so indicate.49

Stock Granted (#) Grant Date

Vesting and/orConditions

(if applicable)Consideration

Paid

(b) Please indicate in the table below all awards of stock options, with or withouttandem SARs, that were granted to you during Fiscal Year [Insert Last Fiscal Year],including the date the particular grant was made, the number of shares or SARs subjectto the award, the per share exercise or base price, any forfeiture terms, and/orperformance, market or other conditions (if applicable) of the award and the expirationdate of the stock options or SARs.50 You should include in the table any stock optionsor SARs that were granted to you but that you subsequently transferred.51

47 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(c)(2)(v).48 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(c)(1) and (2)(iii)-(iv) and

instructions thereto.49 Most grants will be of common stock, but it should be noted if that was not the case.50 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(c)(2)(vi).51 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(c)(2)(vi).

B-16

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (217)

If the exercise or base price is adjustable, please so indicate and describe theadjustment feature. If the Company made more than one grant to you during FiscalYear [Insert Last Fiscal Year], please use a separate line to note each grant. Stockoptions granted in connection with an option repricing transaction reported in Question12 should also be reported below. Please include and note any stock option granted inlieu of cash compensation payments and indicate the amount of compensation fore-gone.52

Options Granted (#) SARs Granted (#)

Exercise or BasePrice (DollarValue/Share)

ExpirationDate

QUESTION 11. Repricings

Was the exercise price of any of your outstanding stock option, SAR or otherequity-based awards adjusted or amended, whether through amendment, cancellation,replacement grants or other means, during Fiscal Year [Insert Last Fiscal Year]?53

Were the terms of any of your outstanding stock option, SAR or other equity-basedawards otherwise modified during Fiscal Year [Insert Last Fiscal Year]?54

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If your answer is “YES,” please describe:

52 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(c)(1) and (2)(iii)-(iv) andinstructions thereto.

53 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Instruction 2 to Item 402(c)(2)(v)-(vi).

54 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Instruction 2 to Item 402(c)(2)(v)and (vi). Only material modifications (and all repricings) must be disclosed, but the Questionnaire isdesigned to elicit information about any modifications so that the Company and the drafter can determinewhether the modifications are material. See also Regulation S-K, Item 402(e)(1)(ii).

B-17

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (218)

QUESTION 12. Pension and Non-Qualified Deferred Compensation Earn-ings (Officers Only)

(a) Did you participate in any defined benefit or other pension plans (includingsupplemental plans) of the Company during Fiscal Year [Insert Last Fiscal Year]?55

This would include any plan that provides for the payment of retirement benefits, orbenefits that will be paid primarily following retirement, including but not limited totax-qualified defined benefit plans (e.g., a plan that pays a life annuity at retirementbased on annual compensation at retirement and years of service) and supplementalexecutive retirement plans (e.g., a non-qualified deferred compensation plan that isrelated to a traditional pension plan), but would exclude any tax-qualified definedcontribution plans (e.g., a 401(k) or profit sharing plan) and nonqualified defined con-tribution plans (e.g., a traditional deferred compensation plan).56

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(b) Did you defer any compensation during Fiscal Year [Insert Last Fiscal Year]on a basis that was not tax qualified (i.e., generally other than through a 401(k) orprofit sharing plan)?57 If “YES,” please note the aggregate dollar amount of deferrals/contributions and the dollar amount of aggregate interest or other earning accruedduring the fiscal year58 below.

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(c) If you answered “YES” to question (b) above, did you receive above-marketor preferential earnings (or dividends in the case of deferred stock) on the compensa-tion you deferred?59 For purposes of this question, interest on deferred compensation isabove-market only if the rate of interest exceeds 120% of the applicable federal long-term rate, with compounding at the rate that corresponds most closely the rate under

55 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(c)(2)(viii)(A) andItem 402(h). This question is designed to elicit basic information to enable the drafter to, with assistancefrom the Company, draft disclosure responsive to both Items 402(c) and 402(h). With respect toItem 402(h), the Company will need to provide the majority of the data.

56 See Instruction 1 to Regulation S-K, Item 402(c)(2)(viii) and Instruction 1 to Item 402(h)(2).57 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(c)(2)(viii)(B) and

Item 402(i).58 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(i)(2)(iv).59 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(c)(2)(viii)(B) and the

instructions thereto. Only the above-market portion of the interest or dividends must be reported. TheCompany will likely need to calculate this amount. The Company will also need to identify whether therehas been a discretionary reset of the applicable interest rate. The calculation will also be different if therates vary depending upon conditions such as a minimum period of continued service. See Instruction 2 toItem 402(c)(2)(viii).

B-18

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (219)

the applicable plan at the time the interest rate or formula was set.60 If you are not surewhether you received above-market or preferential earnings, please indicate below.

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(d) If you answered “YES” to question (b) above, did the Company contributeany funds on your behalf to the plan(s) during Fiscal Year [Insert Last FiscalYear]?61 If “YES,” please note the aggregate dollar amount of contributions below.

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(e) If you answered “YES” to question (b) above, did you make any withdrawalsor receive any distributions from the plan(s) during Fiscal Year [Insert Last FiscalYear]?62 If “YES,” please note the aggregate dollar amount of withdrawals and dis-tributions below.

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(f) If you answered “YES” to question (b) above, please indicate below the totalbalance in your account(s) under each particular plan as of the end of Fiscal Year[Insert Last Fiscal Year].63

If you answered “YES” to any of the questions above, please elaborate on yourresponses by noting the specific plans, the amount deferred (i.e., contributed byyou), the amount the Company contributed or other information requestedabove:

60 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Instruction 2 to Item 402(c)(2)(viii).61 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(i)(2)(iii).62 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(i)(2)(v).63 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(i)(2)(vi).

B-19

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (220)

QUESTION 13. Other Officer Compensation (Officers Only)

Please indicate in the table below all other compensation (regardless of amount)awarded to, earned by, or paid to you during Fiscal Year [Insert Last Fiscal Year]that is not already reported under Questions 10-13 above64 (including compensationrelated to transactions between the Company or any of its affiliates and any third partywhere a purpose of the transaction was to furnish compensation to you or your familymembers). Such compensation would include, but is not limited to:

• Perquisites and other personal benefits, or property, [unless the aggregateamount of such compensation (based on its incremental cost to theCompany) was less than $10,000];65

• All “gross-ups” or other amounts reimbursed to you during the fiscal yearfor the payment of taxes;66

• Any security that you purchased from the Company or its subsidiaries(through deferral of salary or bonus, or otherwise) at a discount from themarket price of the security on the date of purchase, unless the discount isgenerally available either to all security holders of the Company or to all ofthe Company’s salaried employees;67

• Amounts you received or accrued in connection with a change of control ofthe Company;68

• Company contributions or other allocations to vested and unvested definedcontribution plans (e.g. matching contributions to a 401(k) plan);69

• The dollar value of any insurance premiums paid by, or on behalf of, theCompany during the fiscal year with respect to life insurance for your bene-fit;70 and

64 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(c)(2)(ix).65 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(c)(2)(ix)(A) and

Instruction 4 thereto. Note that the drafter may want to delete the exclusion of perquisites amounting toless than $10,000 to enable the Company to obtain information regarding all perquisites and then considerfor itself the proper valuation for disclosure purposes.

66 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(c)(2)(ix)(B).67 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(c)(2)(ix)(C).68 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(c)(2)(ix)(D)(2). Note that

under Item 402(c)(2)(ix)(D)(1) payments or accruals in connection with a Named Executive Officer’stermination of employment, including through retirement, resignation, severance or constructive termi-nation (including a change in responsibilities), must be reported, but someone in that position will notlikely be filling out a D&O questionnaire. The Company will need to provide the required information.

69 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(c)(2)(ix)(E).70 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(c)(2)(ix)(F).

B-20

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (221)

• The dollar value of any dividends or other earnings paid on stock or optionawards.71

The SEC has stated that among the factors to be considered in determiningwhether an item is a perquisite or other personal benefit are the following:72

• An item is not a perquisite if it is integrally and directly related to the per-formance of your duties. This factor should be interpreted narrowly.

• Otherwise, an item is a perquisite or personal benefit if it confers a direct orindirect benefit that has a personal aspect, without regard to whether it maybe provided for some business reason or for the convenience of the Com-pany, unless it is generally available on a non-discriminatory basis to allemployees. This factor should be interpreted broadly.

The following are some examples of items that would qualify as perquisites orother personal benefits: (i) club memberships not used exclusively for businessentertainment purposes; (ii) personal financial or tax advice; (iii) personal travel usingvehicles owned or leased by the Company; (iv) personal travel otherwise financed by theCompany; (v) personal use of other property owned or leased by the Company;(vi) housing and other living expenses (including but not limited to relocation assistanceand payments for you to stay at your personal residence); (vii) security provided at apersonal residence or during personal travel; (viii) commuting expenses (whether or notfor the Company’s convenience or benefit); and (ix) discounts on the Company’s prod-ucts or services not generally available to employees on a nondiscriminatory basis.73

Description of Other Fiscal Year[Insert Last Fiscal Year]

Compensation Dollar Value

71 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(c)(2)(ix)(G). Note thatthis only needs to be disclosed if the amounts were not factored into the grant date fair value required tobe reported for the stock or option award itself. The drafter will need to confirm with the Companywhether that was the case.

72 SEC Release 33-8732, 34-54302, p. 74 (August 29, 2006).73 Note that any item for which an executive officer has actually fully reimbursed the Company for its

total cost should not be considered a perquisite or other personal benefit. See Regulation S-K Complianceand Disclosure Interpretations, Question 119.07.

B-21

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (222)

QUESTION 14. Grants of Plan-Based Awards (Officers Only)

Did you receive any grants or awards under any Incentive Plan during FiscalYear [Insert Last Fiscal Year]?74 This would include grants or awards under bothNon-Equity Incentive Plans and Equity Incentive Plans, and would also include grantsor awards that you subsequently transferred.75

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If you answered “YES,” please briefly describe each grant or award (includingthe grant date and any threshold, target and maximum amounts applicable tothe awards) in the table below.76 If you paid any consideration for the particularaward, please note the amount you paid.77 You may cross reference to grants ofstock, stock options and SARs that you previously noted in response to Ques-tion 11 instead of repeating the information.

Date of Grant/Award Description of Grant/Award

QUESTION 15. Outstanding Equity Awards (Officers Only)

Please describe in the table below all outstanding equity awards (e.g., stockoptions, SARs, restricted stock, restricted stock units and similar instruments) that youheld as of the end of Fiscal Year [Insert Last Fiscal Year] (regardless of when theaward was granted to you).78 Please indicate the number of securities, vesting sched-ule, expiration date and exercise price, as applicable, for each award.79 If any of the

74 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(d).75 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(d)(1).76 This question is designed to elicit basic information to identify the particular grants and awards that

the grantee received. The attorney preparing the SEC disclosure will need to do additional diligence withthe Company to identify the remaining information that must be disclosed under Item 402(d), such asdeviations between the grant date and the date on which the award was approved, deviations between thestrike price of the award and the closing market price of the underlying security on the date of grant, etc.

77 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Instruction 5 to Item 402(d).78 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(f).79 This data is required to be disclosed per Item 402(f) to the extent it is applicable to the particular

award. This question is designed to elicit basic information to identify the particular grants and awardsthat the grantee held at the end of the subject fiscal year. The attorney preparing the disclosure will berequired to take the data the respondent provides here and work with the Company to assemble the relateddata that must be disclosed under Item 402(f), e.g., the market value of stock and equity incentive planawards of stock.

B-22

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (223)

awards have been transferred other than for value, please so indicate and describe thenature of the transfer.80 You may cross reference to grants of stock, stock options andSARs that you previously noted in response to Question 11 instead of repeating theinformation.

Date of Grant/Award Description of Grant/Award

If you have been granted any equity awards (e.g., stock options, SARs, restrictedstock, restricted stock units and similar instruments) since the end of Fiscal Year[Insert Last Fiscal Year], please note the grants below:

QUESTION 16. Option Exercises and Stock Vesting (Officers Only)

(a) Please describe in the table below each exercise of stock options, SARs andsimilar instruments that you had in during Fiscal Year [Insert Last Fiscal Year].81 Ifyou transferred any such securities for value, please indicate which securities weretransferred, when they were transferred and what you received as consideration for thetransfer.82

ExerciseDate

SecurityExercised(Option,

SAR, etc.)

GrantDate ofSecurity

ExercisedNumber

ExercisedSale Price

(if applicable)

(b) Please describe in the table below each grant of stock, including restrictedstock, restricted stock units and similar instruments, that you held at any point during

80 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Instruction 1 to Item 402(f)(2).81 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(g).82 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(g)(2)(iii).

B-23

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (224)

Fiscal Year [Insert Last Fiscal Year].83 To the extent that any or all of the grants thatwould be responsive to this question were already reported in response to Question 16above (because you held them at the end of the fiscal year), you may so indicateinstead of repeating the information. If you transferred any such securities for value,please indicate which securities were transferred, when they were transferred and whatyou received as consideration for the transfer.84

Security Grant Date Vesting Schedule

QUESTION 17. Termination and Change of Control Arrangements(Officers Only)

Do you have any contract, agreement, plan or other arrangement with the Com-pany, whether written or unwritten, that provides for payment(s) to you at, following,or in connection with any termination, including without limitation resignation, sev-erance, retirement or a constructive termination, or a change of control of the Com-pany or a change in your responsibilities?85 This question does not apply to contracts,agreements, plans or other arrangements to the extent they do not discriminate inscope, terms or operation in favor of executive officers of the Company and that areavailable generally to all salaried employees.86

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If you answered “YES,” please identify each such contract, agreement, plan orother arrangement:

83 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(g). The Company will berequired to disclose information regarding amounts realized upon vesting of outstanding stock options,restricted stock, etc., during the last fiscal year, which can be derived based on the data provided regard-ing the vesting schedules, etc. for the particular awards.

84 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(g)(2)(v).85 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(j). This question is

designed to elicit information regarding the existence of any such contract, agreement, plan or arrangement.If the respondent identifies any such agreement, the drafter will need to work with the respondent and theCompany to identify the information regarding that agreement that Item 402(j) requires to be disclosed.

86 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Instruction 5 to Item 402(j).

B-24

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (225)

QUESTION 18. Employment Agreements (Officers Only)

Except for any change of control agreement identified in response to Question 18,do you have any other contract, agreement, plan or arrangement with the Companywith respect to your employment (such as an employment agreement or offer letter)?

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If you answered “YES,” please identify each such contract, agreement, plan orarrangement:

DIRECTOR COMPENSATION AND RELATED MATTERS

QUESTION 19. Director Compensation (Directors only)

(a) Please provide a description of any arrangement (including the Company’sstandard arrangements with directors), stating amounts, pursuant to which you arecompensated for all services as a director, including any additional amounts payablefor committee participation or special assignments.87

(b) Please state the aggregate dollar amount of all fees you earned or were paid incash for services as a director during Fiscal Year [Insert Last Fiscal Year], includingannual retainer fees, committee and or chairmanship fees, and meeting fees.88

87 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(k)(3). The Company isrequired to disclose both its standard compensation arrangements with directors and whether any directorhas a non-standard arrangement. A copy of last year’s proxy statement could be used as a reference.

88 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(k)(2)(ii).

B-25

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (226)

(c) Please identify in the table below any awards of stock (including restrictedstock) and stock options (with or without tandem SARs) that you were granted duringFiscal Year [Insert Last Fiscal Year], the number of shares subject to the award, thevesting period, forfeiture terms, and/or performance, market or other conditions (ifapplicable) of the award and any consideration you paid for the shares.89 Please note inthe table any awards that you subsequently transferred.90

SecurityGranted

GrantDate

# Shares/Units

Vesting and/or Conditions(if applicable)

ConsiderationPaid (if

applicable)

(d) Please describe in the table below all outstanding stock option (with or with-out tandem SARs) and stock (including restricted stock) awards that you held as of theend of Fiscal Year [Insert Last Fiscal Year] (regardless of when the award wasgranted to you).91 You may cross reference to grants that you previously noted inresponse to Question 20(c) instead of repeating the information.

SecurityGranted

GrantDate

# Shares/Units

Vesting and/or Conditions(if applicable)

ConsiderationPaid (if

applicable)

(e) Did you participate in any Non-Equity Incentive Plan during Fiscal Year[Insert Last Fiscal Year]?92

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

89 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(k)(2)(iii) and (iv).90 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(k)(2)(iv).91 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Instruction to Regulation S-K, Item 402(k)(2)(iii)

and (iv). Unlike with respect to officers of the Company, only the aggregate number of stock awards andaggregate number of option awards outstanding at fiscal year end needs to be disclosed for directors.

92 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(k)(2)(v).

B-26

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (227)

If you answered “YES,” please identify the plan(s) and note the dollar value ofall earnings for services performed during Fiscal Year [Insert Last FiscalYear] and all earnings on outstanding awards under the plan(s), as applicable:

(f) Did you participate in any defined benefit or other pension plans (includingsupplemental plans) of the Company during Fiscal Year [Insert Last Fiscal Year]?93

This would include any plan that provides for the payment of retirement benefits, orbenefits that will be paid primarily following retirement, including but not limited totax-qualified defined benefit plans (e.g., a plan that pays a life annuity at retirementbased on annual compensation at retirement and years of service) and supplementalexecutive retirement plans (e.g., a non-qualified deferred compensation plan that isrelated to a traditional pension plan), but would exclude any tax-qualified definedcontribution plans (e.g., a 401(k) or profit sharing plan) and nonqualified defined con-tribution plans (e.g., a traditional deferred compensation plan).94

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(g) Did you defer any compensation during Fiscal Year [Insert Last Fiscal Year]on a basis that was not tax qualified (i.e., generally other than through a 401(k) orprofit sharing plan)?95

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(h) If you answered “YES” to question (g) above, did you receive above-marketor preferential earnings (or dividends in the case of deferred stock) on the compensa-tion you deferred?96 For purposes of this question, interest on deferred compensation is

93 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(k)(2)(vi)(A) and (B). Thisquestion is designed to elicit basic information to enable the drafter to, with assistance from the Company,draft responsive disclosure. With respect to Item 402(k)(2)(vi)(A), the Company will need to provide thedata.

94 See Instruction 1 to Regulation S-K, Item 402(c)(2)(viii). Certain instructions to Item 402(c) applyequally to Item 402(k) as well per Instruction to Item 402(k).

95 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(k)(2)(vi)(B).96 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(c)(2)(viii)(B) and the

instructions thereto. Certain instructions to Item 402(c) apply equally to Item 402(k) as well per theinstruction to Item 402(k). Only the above-market portion of the interest or dividends must be reported.The Company will likely need to calculate this amount. The Company will also need to identify whetherthere has been a discretionary reset of the applicable interest rate. The calculation will also be different ifthe rates vary depending upon conditions such as a minimum period of continued service. See RegulationS-K, Instruction 2 to Item 402(c)(2)(viii).

B-27

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (228)

above-market only if the rate of interest exceeds 120% of the applicable federal long-term rate, with compounding at the rate that corresponds most closely the rate underthe applicable plan at the time the interest rate or formula was set.97 If you are not surewhether you received above-market or preferential earnings, please indicate below.

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(i) Please indicate in the table below all other compensation (regardless ofamount) awarded to, earned by, or paid to you during Fiscal Year [Insert Last FiscalYear] that is not already reported in this Question 2098 (including compensationrelated to transactions between the Company or any of its affiliates and any third partywhere a purpose of the transaction was to furnish compensation to you or your familymembers). Such compensation would include, but is not limited to:

• Perquisites and other personal benefits, or property, unless the aggregateamount of such compensation (based on its incremental cost to the Com-pany) was less than $10,000;99

• All “gross-ups” or other amounts reimbursed to you during the fiscal yearfor the payment of taxes;100

• Any security that you purchased from the Company or its subsidiaries(through deferral of salary or bonus, or otherwise) at a discount from themarket price of the security on the date of purchase, unless the discount isgenerally available either to all security holders of the Company or to all ofthe Company’s salaried employees;101

• Amounts you received or accrued in connection with a change of control ofthe Company;102

• Company contributions or other allocations to vested and unvested definedcontribution plans (e.g. matching contributions to a 401(k) plan);103

97 See Regulation S-K, Instruction 2 to Item 402(c)(2)(viii).98 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(k)(2)(vii).99 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(k)(2)(vii)(A) and

Instructions 2 and 3 thereto.100 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(k)(2)(vii)(B).101 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(k)(2)(vii)(C).102 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(k)(2)(vii)(D)(2). Note

that under Item 402(k)(2)(vii)(D)(1) payments or accruals in connection with a director’s resignation,retirement or other termination must be reported, but someone in that position will not likely be filling outa D&O questionnaire. The Company will need to provide the required information.

103 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(k)(2)(vii)(E).

B-28

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (229)

• Consulting fees earned from, or paid or payable by the Company and/or itssubsidiaries (including joint ventures);104

• The annual costs of payments and promises of payments pursuant to directorlegacy programs and similar charitable award programs;105

• The dollar value of any insurance premiums paid by, or on behalf of, theCompany during the fiscal year with respect to life insurance for your bene-fit;106 and

• The dollar value of any dividends or other earnings paid on stock or optionawards.107

The SEC has stated that among the factors to be considered in determiningwhether an item is a perquisite or other personal benefit are the following:108

• An item is not a perquisite if it is integrally and directly related to the per-formance of your duties. This factor should be interpreted narrowly.

• Otherwise, an item is a perquisite or personal benefit if it confers a direct orindirect benefit that has a personal aspect, without regard to whether it maybe provided for some business reason or for the convenience of the Com-pany, unless it is generally available on a non-discriminatory basis to allemployees. This factor should be interpreted broadly.

104 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(k)(2)(vii)(F).105 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(k)(2)(vii)(G) and

Instruction 1 to Item 402(k)(2)(vii).106 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(k)(2)(vii)(H).107 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(k)(2)(vii)(I). Note that

this only needs to be disclosed if the amounts were not factored into the grant date fair value required tobe reported for the stock or option award itself. The drafter will need to confirm with the Companywhether that was the case.

108 SEC Release 33-8732, 34-54302, p. 74 (August 29, 2006).

B-29

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (230)

The following are some examples of items that would qualify as perquisites orother personal benefits: (i) club memberships not used exclusively for business enter-tainment purposes; (ii) personal financial or tax advice; (iii) personal travel usingvehicles owned or leased by the Company; (iv) personal travel otherwise financed bythe Company; (v) personal use of other property owned or leased by the Company;(vi) housing and other living expenses (including but not limited to relocation assis-tance and payments for you to stay at your personal residence); (vii) security providedat a personal residence or during personal travel; (viii) commuting expenses (whetheror not for the Company’s convenience or benefit); and (ix) discounts on the Compa-ny’s products or services not generally available to employees on a nondiscriminatorybasis.

Description of Other Fiscal Year[Insert Last Fiscal Year] Compensation Dollar Value

QUESTION 20. Director Legacy Program (Directors Only)

Does the Company have a “director legacy” or “charitable awards” program inwhich you participate?109 For the purposes of this question, programs in which theCompany has agreed to make donations to one or more charitable institutions in yourname, payable by the Company currently or on a designated event, such as yourretirement, (as well as similar programs) are considered “director legacy” or“charitable awards” programs.

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If your answer is “YES,” please provide a description of the material terms of,and the total dollar amounts payable under, each such program:

109 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 402(k)(2)(vii)(G) andInstruction 1 to Item 402(k)(2)(vii).

B-30

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (231)

QUESTION 21. Boards of Directors and Committees (Directors Only)110

(a) Please state whether you attended the prior year’s annual meeting of stock-holders.111

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(b) Please state below the total number of meetings of the board of directors(including regularly scheduled and special meetings) held during Fiscal Year [InsertLast Fiscal Year]:112

Number of meetings:

(c) During Fiscal Year [Insert Last Fiscal Year], did you attend all meetings ofthe board of directors of the Company? If your answer is “NO,” please indicate thenumber of meetings you missed.113

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

Number of meetings missed:

110 Schedule 14A, Item 7(d). See Regulation S-K, Item 407(b). This item also requires disclosure of theCompany’s policy regarding board members’ attendance at annual meetings.

111 Schedule 14A, Item 7(d). See Regulation S-K, Item 407(b)(1).112 Schedule 14A, Item 7(d). See Regulation S-K, Item 407(b)(1).113 Schedule 14A, Item 7(d). See Regulation S-K, Item 407(b)(1).

B-31

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (232)

(d) Please complete the table below regarding the committees of the Company’sboard of directors. Please specify if you served as a member of any committee of theboard of directors for less than the full fiscal year and complete the table for the por-tion of the fiscal year during which you served:114

Board HasCommittee

I am aMember

Number ofMeetings HeldDuring FiscalYear [InsertLast Fiscal

Year]

Number ofMeetings IAttended

During FiscalYear [InsertLast Fiscal

Year]

(i) Audit Yes ‘ No ‘ Yes ‘ No ‘

(ii) Compensation Yes ‘ No ‘ Yes ‘ No ‘

(iii) Nominating[/CorporateGovernance115] Yes ‘ No ‘ Yes ‘ No ‘

(iv) Other:(list name ofcommittee) Yes ‘ No ‘

(list name ofcommittee) Yes ‘ No ‘

114 Schedule 14A, Item 7(d). See Regulation S-K, Item 407(b)(1).115 Include if the Company is listed on the NYSE. See NYSE Listed Company Manual § 303A.04.

B-32

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (233)

SECURITY OWNERSHIP

QUESTION 22. Stock Ownership

(a) Please state in the table below the type and number of the Company’s equitysecurities beneficially owned by you and/or which you have the right to acquire (throughthe exercise of options, warrants or otherwise) on or before [Insert Date Sixty(60) Days After the Most Recent Practicable Date Prior to the Anticipated Filing].Include in this table all of the Company’s equity securities that are: (i) registered in yourname, including shares registered in your name as trustee, executor, custodian, pledgee,agent or nominee, either alone or with others; (ii) owned beneficially by you or anyassociate of yours; or (iii) registered in the name of a nominee or in street name, includ-ing any shares held for the account of any of the above.116 If you do not have sole votingand investment power over any of the securities, please so indicate in the table below.

Name ofRecord Owner

Type ofSecurity

Number ofShares

Type of Ownership(trust, partnership,

direct, personal, etc.)

(b) Please state the following information in the table below regarding all stockoptions you hold: (i) the grant date, (ii) the number of shares subject to the originallygranted options, (iii) the number of shares remaining subject to the options, and(iv) the schedule or terms of any vesting or exercise provisions.117

Grant Date

Number of SharesOriginally

Subjectto Option

Number of SharesRemaining

Subject to OptionVestingSchedule

116 Form 10-K, Item 12; Schedule 14A, Item 6. See Regulation S-K, Item 403 and instructions thereto.See also Exchange Act Rule 13d-3(d)(1).

117 Form 10-K, Item 12; Schedule 14A, Item 6. See Regulation S-K, Item 403 and instructions thereto.See also Exchange Act Rule 13d-3(d)(1).

B-33

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (234)

(c) Do you hold any warrants, convertible debt or other securities (other thanoptions) or rights to acquire securities of the Company?118 If your answer is “YES,”please describe the securities or rights below.

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

Description, if applicable:

(d) Do you share voting and/or investment control over any shares of the Compa-ny’s securities?119 If your answer is “YES,” please provide below a brief description ofany arrangement concerning the shared control and the number of shares subject to thearrangement. “Shared voting power” and “shared investment power” are generallyapplied to securities held as tenants in common and in cases where you are a co-trusteeor where someone’s signature and approval other than your own are necessary to voteor sell the securities.

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

Description, if applicable:

(e) Are any of the Company’s securities that you beneficially own pledged as secu-rity (e.g., pledged to a bank or broker in connection with a loan or margin account) orsubject to a negative pledge (e.g., a promise by a borrower to a lender not to conveysecurities to a third party or otherwise encumber them)?120 If your answer is “YES,”please provide below a brief description of the nature of any such pledge, the type andamount of securities subject to the pledge, and the amount outstanding under the pledge.Please also provide a brief description of the material terms of the pledge arrangement.

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

118 Form 10-K, Item 12; Schedule 14A, Item 6. See Regulation S-K, Item 403 and instructions thereto.See also Exchange Act Rule 13d-3(d)(1).

119 Form 10-K, Item 12; Schedule 14A, Item 6. See Regulation S-K, Item 403 and instructions thereto.See also Exchange Act Rule 13d-3(d)(1).

120 Form 10-K, Item 12; Schedule 14A, Item 6. See Regulation S-K, Item 403(b) and instructionsthereto. See also Exchange Act Rule 13d-3(d)(1). See also Regulation S-K Compliance and DisclosureInterpretations, Question 129.04.

B-34

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (235)

Description, if applicable:

QUESTION 23. Disclaimer of Beneficial Ownership

Do you wish to disclaim beneficial ownership of any of the shares reported inresponse to Question 23?121

Note: Whether you make such a disclaimer is, of course, entirely a matter of yourown decision. You may wish to consult with counsel in this connection as a disclaimermay be important not only in connection with the securities laws, but also because,without it, your reporting the ownership of such shares might be construed as anadmission of ownership by you for other purposes, such as short-swing tradingliabilities.

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If the answer is “YES,” please complete the table below with the requestedinformation regarding the person(s) who should be shown as the beneficial owner(s) ofthe shares in question.

Class of Stock

Number ofShares

BeneficiallyOwned

Name ofActual

BeneficialOwner

Relationshipof Such Person

to You

QUESTION 24. Interest in Subsidiaries

Do you beneficially own any equity securities of any subsidiary of the Company?If your answer is “YES,” please list your interest(s) in the table below.122

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

Name of Subsidiary Securities Owned Date Acquired

121 Form 10-K, Item 12; Schedule 14A, Item 6. See Regulation S-K, Item 403 and instructions thereto.See also Exchange Act Rule 13d-4.

122 Form 10-K, Item 12; Schedule 14A, Item 6. See Regulation S-K, Item 403(b) and instructionsthereto. See also Exchange Act Rule 13d-3(d)(1).

B-35

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (236)

QUESTION 25. 5% Stockholders

Do you know of any person (including yourself and your associates) who is thebeneficial owner of more than 5% of any class of the Company’s equity securities? Ifyour answer is “YES,” please provide the requested information in the table below tothe extent you know such information.123

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

Shareholder’sName

and AddressTitle of

Securities Amount HeldPercentage

Owned

Nature ofOwnership(“Direct”

or“Indirect”)*

Note: Please explain the nature of any indirect ownership (e.g., “indirectly, astrustee for children,” “indirectly, by spouse,” “indirectly, by trust,” etc.).

QUESTION 26. Voting Arrangements

Do you know of any voting trust or similar agreement or arrangement pursuant towhich more than 5% of the Company’s outstanding common stock is held or is to beheld? If your answer is “YES,” please describe below.124

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

Description, if applicable:

123 Form 10-K, Item 12; Schedule 14A, Item 6. See Regulation S-K, Item 403 and instructions thereto.See also Exchange Act Rule 13d-3(d)(1).

124 Form 10-K, Item 12; Schedule 14A, Item 6. See Regulation S-K, Item 403(b) and Instruction 7thereto. See also Exchange Act Rule 13d-3(d)(1).

B-36

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (237)

TRANSACTIONS AND RELATIONSHIPS

QUESTION 27. Transactions with Company

(a) Has there been any transaction [since the beginning of [Insert Last FiscalYear]], or is there any currently proposed transaction, to which the Company or anyof its affiliates was or is to be a participant, which exceeds $120,000 in amount and inwhich you or any related person had or will have a direct or indirect interest?125 Theamount of the interest is to be computed without regard to the amount of any profit orloss involved in the transaction.126

In the case of a transaction involving a lease or otherwise providing for periodicpayments or installments, include the aggregate amount of all periodic payments orinstallments due on or after the beginning of the last fiscal year, including any requiredor optional payments due during or at the conclusion of the lease or other transactionsproviding for periodic payments or installments.127 In the case of a transaction involv-ing indebtedness, include the largest amount of all indebtedness outstanding at anytime since the beginning of the last fiscal year and all amounts of interest payable on itduring the last fiscal year.128 The following items may be excluded from the calcu-lation of the amount of indebtedness: amounts due from the related person for pur-chases of goods and services subject to usual trade terms, for ordinary business traveland expense payments and for other transactions in the ordinary course of business.129

Examples of possible interests which must be disclosed are: You or any of yourassociates (i) has been, is now, or proposes to be a shareholder holding in excess of tenpercent (10%) of the Company’s stock, an officer, director or employee of a majorcreditor, customer or supplier of the Company or any subsidiaries or has an interest

125 Form 10-K, Item 13; Schedule 14A, Item 5(b)(1)(xi), Item 7(b) and Item 22(b). See Regulation S-K,Item 404(a) and instructions thereto Item 404(a) only requires disclosure of material interests, but thisquestion is designed to elicit information to allow the drafter and the Company to determine what is mate-rial. Note also that certain interests are not required to be disclosed pursuant to the instructions toItem 404(a).

126 Form 10-K, Item 13; Schedule 14A, Item 5(b)(1)(xi), Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 404(a)(4),but the question is designed to elicit information to allow the drafter and the Company to determine if anyof the exceptions apply.

127 Form 10-K, Item 13; Schedule 14A, Item 5(b)(1)(xi), Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Instruction3(a) to Item 404(a).

128 Form 10-K, Item 13; Schedule 14A, Item 5(b)(1)(xi), Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Instruction3(b) to Item 404(a).

129 Form 10-K, Item 13; Schedule 14A, Item 5(b)(1)(xi), Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Instruction4(a) to Item 404(a). Note also that in the case of indebtedness, if the lender is a bank, savings and loan orbroker-dealer you may also omit certain disclosures in some circ*mstances as described in Instruction 4(c)to Item 404(a).

B-37

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (238)

in any such creditor, customer or supplier; (ii) is a seller, buyer, lessee or lessor ofproperty to, or from, the Company or any subsidiary; (iii) is the lender or guarantor ofa loan made to, or is a borrower from, the Company or any subsidiary; (iv) is thedebtor under an obligation which the Company or any subsidiary guarantees; and(v) is a buyer of securities or evidences of indebtedness from the Company or anysubsidiary. If applicable, such transaction(s), the name of any such associate(s) andthe nature of your relationship(s) with such associate(s) should be included. If any ofyour immediate family members are employed by the Company or any of its sub-sidiaries and such person’s annual compensation exceeds $120,000, such relationshipshould be disclosed.

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If your answer to question (a) is “YES,” please (i) name the related person andbriefly describe the basis on which the person is a related person, (ii) briefly describethe related person’s interest in the transaction, including their position(s) orrelationship(s) with, or ownership in, a firm, corporation or other entity that is a partyto, or has an interest in, the transaction, (iii) note the approximate dollar value of theamount involved in the transaction (in the case of indebtedness, please indicate thelargest aggregate amount of principal outstanding, the amount outstanding as of thelatest practicable date, the amount of principal and interest paid during the relevantperiod, and the rate or amount of interest payable on the indebtedness. Please alsoindicate any other information regarding the transaction or the related person in thecontext of the transaction that is material in light of the circ*mstances of the particulartransaction.130

Description, if applicable:

130 Form 10-K, Item 13; Schedule 14A, Item 5(b)(1)(xi), Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 404(a)(6).

B-38

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (239)

(b) Other than those you have described elsewhere in this Questionnaire, hasthere been any transaction since [the beginning of Fiscal Year [Insert Last FiscalYear]], or is there any currently proposed transaction, to which the Company or anyof its affiliates was or is to be a participant, and in which you or any of your familymembers had or will have a direct or indirect interest?131 If your answer is “YES,”please describe below.

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

Description, if applicable:

QUESTION 28. Entities You Control132

Do you control, either directly or indirectly, any entities?

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If your answer is “yes”, please list all entities that you control, either directly orindirectly. If you have indirect or direct control over an entity, which in turn controlsanother entity, both entities are considered controlled by you and should be listedbelow.

131 This question is designed to elicit information that does not otherwise fall within the general scopeof Item 404(a) but that may otherwise be material, or may, upon further investigation, fall within the gen-eral scope of Item 404(a). It is also designed to elicit information that, while not disclosable underItem 404(a), may need to be categorized by type and disclosed under Item 407(a)(3).

132 This question is for the purpose of soliciting information which may need to be disclosed pursuant toFASB ASC 850, Related Party Disclosures. The adoption of Auditing Standard No. 18 by the PublicCompany Accounting Oversight Board has focused auditor attention on the controls and procedures uti-lized to collect the information necessary to satisfy the accounting standard.

B-39

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (240)

QUESTION 29. Entities Over Which You Can Exert Significant Influ-ence133

Can you exert significant influence, either directly or indirectly, over any entities,to the extent that the entity may be prevented from fully pursuing its own separateinterests with regard to any transactions with the Company and its affiliates? Arelationship that meets this level of influence should be identified even if there are nocurrent or anticipated transactions between the entity and the Company and itsaffiliates.

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If your answer is “yes”, please list all entities over which you can exert sig-nificant influence, either directly or indirectly. If you can exert significant influence,either directly or indirectly, over an entity which in turn can exert significant influenceover another entity, both entities should be listed below.

QUESTION 30. Other Employment and Directorships134

Are there any entities, other than those already listed in your responses to otherquestions in this Questionnaire, with which you serve as a member of the board ofdirectors or have any other employment relationship, even if the directorship and/oremployment relationship does not result in your ability to exert control or significantinfluence over the entity as described above?

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If your answer is “yes”, please list all such entities and indicate your position withthe entity.

133 FASB ASC 850, Related Party Disclosures.134 FASB ASC 850, Related Party Disclosures.

B-40

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (241)

QUESTION 31. Family Relationships135

Please list the individuals, and any of their affiliations in which they control orsignificantly influence an entity to the extent that the entity might be prevented fromfully pursuing its own separate interests with regard to any transactions with theCompany and its affiliates, who, in your judgement, might control or influence you, orwho might be controlled or influenced by you, because of your family relationship. Inmost cases, this definition would include your spouse, children and other familymembers living in the same household as you. It may also include a parent, stepparent,sibling, in-law, family members to whom you provide or receive significant monetarysupport, or any other relatives in a position to have control or influence on you, or tobe controlled or influenced by you.

Family Relationships

Names Affiliations

QUESTION 32. Contracts with the Company

Are you, or is any associate of yours, a party to any contract (including anymanagement contract or compensatory plan, contract or arrangement) with the Com-pany or in which the Company or any subsidiary has a beneficial interest, or to whichthe Company has succeeded by assumption or assignment, which is to be performed inwhole or in part at or after the end of the Company’s last fiscal year, or which wasentered into within the Company’s last two (2) fiscal years? If your answer is “YES,”please describe below.136

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

Description, if applicable:

135 FASB ASC 850, Related Party Disclosures.136 Form 10-K, Item 15. See Regulation S-K, Item 601(b)(10).

B-41

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (242)

QUESTION 33. Personal Loans from the Company

Have you received at any time during the previous 24 months, or do you currentlyhave outstanding any loan or extension of credit in the form of a personal loan fromthe Company or any of its affiliates?137

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

Has the Company or any of its affiliates arranged such a loan or an extension ofcredit in the form of a personal loan from any third party during the same timeperiod?138

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

Is any such loan or extension of credit proposed to be extended to you duringFiscal Year [Insert Current Fiscal Year]?139

ANSWER YES ‘ NO ‘

If you answered “YES” to any of these questions, please describe below the mate-rial terms of the loan or extension of credit, including the original principal amount,the current balance and the material terms of the loan (including term, interest rate,etc.). Please also describe any modifications, amendments, renewals or forgiveness ofsuch loans or extensions of credit made during the previous 24 months or intended tobe made during Fiscal Year [Insert Current Fiscal Year] to any pre-existing loans orextensions of credit.

137 See Sarbanes-Oxley Act § 402. See also Cal. Corp. Code § 1502.1(a)(5) and § 2117.1(a)(5).138 See Sarbanes-Oxley Act § 402. See also Cal. Corp. Code § 1502.1(a)(5) and § 2117.1(a)(5).139 See Sarbanes-Oxley Act § 402. See also Cal. Corp. Code § 1502.1(a)(5) and § 2117.1(a)(5).

B-42

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (243)

QUESTION 34. Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Partic-ipation

(a) During the last three (3) fiscal years, have you participated in deliberations ofthe Company’s board of directors (or compensation committee) concerning executiveofficer compensation? If your answer is “YES,” please describe the details below.140

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

Description, if applicable:

(b) During the last three (3) fiscal years, have you (i) served as a member of thecompensation committee (or other board committee performing equivalent functions orin the absence of any such committee, the entire board of directors) of another entity,which had an executive officer who served as a director or member of the compensationcommittee (or other board committee performing equivalent functions or in the absenceof any such committee, the entire board of directors) of the Company or (ii) served as adirector of another entity which had an executive officer who served as a member of thecompensation committee (or other board committee performing equivalent functions orin the absence of any such committee, the entire board of directors) of the Company? Ifyour answer is “YES,” please describe the relationship below.141

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

Description, if applicable:

140 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 407(e) and instruction thereto.141 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 407(e) and instruction

thereto.

B-43

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (244)

QUESTION 35. Adverse Interests

Do you or any associate or family member of yours have an interest adverse tothat of the Company or any of its affiliates in any pending or contemplated legal pro-ceeding (including administrative proceedings and investigations by governmentalauthorities) to which the Company or any of its affiliates is or will be a party or ofwhich any of its or their property is or will be the subject? If your answer is “YES,”please describe.142

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

Description, if applicable:

QUESTION 36. Legal Proceedings; Investigations

Do you know of any legal, regulatory or administrative proceeding brought orcontemplated by any governmental authority (including but not limited to antitrust,price-fixing, tax, environmental, copyright or patent litigation) to which the Companyor any subsidiary is or may be a party or of which the property of the Company or anysubsidiary is subject? If your answer is “YES,” please give the details below.143

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

Description, if applicable:

QUESTION 37. Compensation Consultants

(a) [Other than [Insert Compensation Consultant Name], which the [InsertCommittee Name] has engaged, are] [Are] you aware of any compensation consultantthat has been engaged by the Board or any committee of the Board? If your answer is“YES,” please give details below. For all compensation consultants engaged (including[Insert Compensation Consultant Name]), please describe to the extent of your

142 Form 10-K, Item 3; Form 10-Q, Item 1; Schedule 14A, Item 7(a) and Instruction 7(d)(3) to Item 14.See Regulation S-K, Item 103, Instruction 4.

143 Form 10-K, Item 3; Form 10-Q, Item 1; Schedule 14A, Item 7(a) and Instruction 7(d)(3) to Item 14.See Regulation S-K, Item 103, Instruction 4.

B-44

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (245)

knowledge, each such consultant’s name, the committee (if not engaged by the Board)that has engaged such consultant, the amount paid or agreed to be paid to such con-sultant, and the material elements of the instructions or directions given to the con-sultants with respect to the performance of their duties under the engagement.144

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

Description, if applicable:

(b) [Other than [Insert Compensation Consultant Name], which managementof the Company has engaged, are] [Are] you aware of any compensation consultantthat has been engaged by management of the Company? If your answer is “YES,”please give details below. For all compensation consultants engaged (including [InsertCompensation Consultant Name]), please describe to the extent of your knowledge,each such consultant’s name, the committee (if not engaged by the board of directors)that has engaged such consultant, the amount paid or agreed to be paid to such con-sultant, and the material elements of the instructions or directions given to the con-sultants with respect to the performance of their duties under the engagement.145

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

Description, if applicable:

(c) Do you have any business or personal relationship with: (i) any individualconsultants employed by [[Insert Compensation Consultant Name]][the compensa-tion consultant described above]; (ii) [[Insert Compensation Consultant Name]][thecompensation consultant described above]; (iii) any other individual compensationconsultant employed by a compensation consulting firm engaged by the board ofdirectors, the compensation committee, or any other committee of the board of direc-tors; or (iv) any other compensation consulting firm engaged by the board of directors,

144 Note, if the identity of the compensation consultant is not known, delete the bracketed language.Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 407(e)(3)(iii).

145 Note, if the identity of the compensation consultant is not known, delete the bracketed language.Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 407(e)(3)(iii).

B-45

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (246)

the compensation committee, or any other committee of the board of directors? If youranswer is “YES,” please give details below, describing the nature of the relationshipand identifying the individual compensation consultant and/or compensation consult-ing firm with whom you have the relationship:146

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

Description, if applicable:

(d) Do you have any knowledge of, or reason to believe, that there is an actual orpotential conflict of interest between (i) yourself or the Company, its directors or itsexecutive officers and (ii) [[Insert Compensation Consultant Name]][the compensa-tion consultant described above] (including its individual consultants) or any othercompensation consultant (including its individual consultants) that has been engaged bythe board of directors, the compensation committee or any other committee of the boardof directors? If your answer is “YES,” please give details below, describing the nature ofthe relationship, identifying the individual compensation consultant and/or compensationconsulting firm, and the nature of the actual or potential conflict of interest:147

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

Description, if applicable:

(e) Please provide the information requested in Questions 37(c) and (d) withrespect to any other advisors or counsel (including individual advisors or counselassociated with an advisory firm or law firm) that the [Insert Committee Name] hasselected or from whom the [Insert Committee Name] has obtained advice (eitherdirectly or indirectly).

146 Note, if the identity of the compensation consultant is not known, delete the bracketed language.Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 407(e)(3)(iii).

147 Note, if the identity of the compensation consultant is not known, delete the bracketed language.Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 8. See Regulation S-K, Item 407(e)(3)(iii).

B-46

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (247)

Description, if applicable:

QUESTION 38. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act

(a) In connection with your response to this question, the following instructionsapply:

(i) Your answers should relate to the activities or conduct of the Company andany affiliate of the Company, as well as to the conduct of any person who has acted oris acting on behalf of or for the benefit of any of them. Persons who have acted or areacting on behalf of or for the benefit of any entity include, but are not necessarily lim-ited to, directors, officers, employees, agents, consultants and sales representatives.

(ii) Your answers should relate not only to activities or conduct within theUnited States, but outside the United States as well.

(iii) The terms “payments” and “contributions” include not only giving cash orhard goods but also giving anything else of value (e.g., services or the use of property).

(iv) The term “indirectly” means an act done through an intermediary. Pay-ments to sales agents or representatives that are passed on in whole or in part to pur-chasers, or compensation or reimbursem*nt to persons in consideration for their acts,are examples of acts done through intermediaries.

(v) Your answers should include not only matters of which you have directpersonal knowledge, but also matters which you have reason to believe may haveexisted or occurred (for example, you may not “know” of your own personal knowl-edge that contributions were made by the Company to a political party in a foreignland, but, based upon information which has otherwise come to your attention, youmay nonetheless have “reason to believe” that such a contribution was made. In thatcase, your response would be “YES.”)

(b) Do you have any knowledge or reason to believe that any of the activities ortypes of conduct enumerated below have been or may have been engaged in, eitherdirectly or indirectly, at any time:

(i) Any bribes or kickbacks to government officials or their relatives, or anyother payments to such persons, whether or not legal, to obtain or retain business or toreceive favorable treatment with regard to business.

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

B-47

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (248)

(ii) Any bribes or kickbacks to persons other than government officials, or torelatives of such persons, or any other payments to such persons or their relatives,whether or not legal, to obtain or retain business or to receive favorable treatment withregard to business.

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(iii) Any contributions, whether or not legal, made to any political party, politi-cal candidate or officeholder.

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(iv) Any bank accounts, funds or pools of funds created or maintained withoutbeing reflected on the corporate books of account, or as to which the receipts and dis-bursem*nts therefrom have not been reflected on the books of account.

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(v) Any receipts or disbursem*nts, the actual nature of which has been“disguised” or intentionally mis-recorded on the corporate books of account.

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(vi) Any fees paid to consultants or commercial agents that exceeded the rea-sonable value of the services purported to have been rendered.

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(vii) Any payments or reimbursem*nts made to the Company’s personnel toenable them to expend time or to make contributions or payments of the kinds or forthe purposes referred to in subparts (i) – (vi) above.

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If your answer is “YES” to any of the foregoing questions, please describe thedetails of the subject transaction below:

B-48

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (249)

QUESTION 39. Description of Associates

Please note in the following table the full name, form (e.g., partnership, corpo-ration, etc.), nature of business done by, and principal place of business of each asso-ciate of yours referred to in the answers to this Questionnaire and your relationshipwith such associate(s), if applicable.148

Name

Form ofOrganization(if applicable)

Nature ofBusiness

PrincipalPlace ofBusiness Relationship

QUESTION 40. Change in Control

(a) Do you know of any change in control of the Company that has occurredduring any of the Company’s last three (3) fiscal years or during the Company’s cur-rent fiscal year? If your answer is “YES,” please provide a brief description of thechange in control.149

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

Description, if applicable:

(b) Do you know of any arrangement, including any pledge by any person ofsecurities of the Company, the operation of which may at a subsequent date result in achange in control of the Company?150 If your answer is “YES,” please provide a briefdescription of the arrangement(s).

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

Description, if applicable:

148 Form 10-K, Item 13; Schedule 14A, Items 7(b). See generally Regulation S-K, Item 404.149 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 6(d). See Regulation S-K, Item 403(c).150 Form 10-K, Item 11; Schedule 14A, Item 6(d). See Regulation S-K, Item 403(c).

B-49

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (250)

QUESTION 41. Regulatory Investigations

(a) Have you been involved in, or has any inquiry, investigation, lawsuit or dis-ciplinary action been initiated against you by any regulatory or professional orga-nization, including, but not limited to, the SEC, any state securities commission,FINRA (formerly NASD) or any foreign regulatory authority?

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If your answer is “YES,” please provide a detailed description of the applicableinquiry, investigation, lawsuit or disciplinary action, including a chronology and cur-rent status.

Description, if applicable:

(b) Do you know of any inquiry, investigation, lawsuit or disciplinary action ini-tiated against the Company, any of its officers, directors, principals, associates, affili-ates, predecessors, or five percent (5%) stockholders by any regulatory organizationincluding, but not limited to, the SEC, any state securities commission, FINRA(formerly NASD) or any foreign regulatory authority?

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If your answer is “YES,” please provide a detailed description, to the best of yourknowledge, of any applicable inquiry, investigation, lawsuit or disciplinary action,including a chronology and current status.

Description, if applicable:

QUESTION 42. Indemnification

Other than pursuant to a statutory provision or provision of the Company’s char-ter or bylaws, do you know of any arrangement in which a director or officer of theCompany is insured or indemnified in any manner against liability that he may incur in

B-50

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (251)

his capacity as such, including, without limitation, any indemnification agreement withthe Company? If your answer is “YES,” please provide a brief description of thearrangement(s) in the space below.

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

Description, if applicable:

QUESTION 43. Accounting Matters

(a) Do you believe that the systems of internal accounting controls of the Com-pany in place during the Company’s last fiscal year provided reasonable assurancesthat:

(i) Transactions were executed in accordance with management’s general orspecific authorization?

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(ii) Transactions were recorded as necessary (a) to permit preparation of finan-cial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles (or otherapplicable criteria) and (b) to maintain accountability for assets?

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(iii) Access to assets was permitted only in accordance with management’sgeneral or specific authorization?

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(iv) The recorded accountability for assets was compared with the existingassets at reasonable intervals and appropriate action was taken with respect to anydifferences?

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If you answered “NO” to any of subparts (i)–(iv), please explain your response ona separate sheet of paper and attach it to the Questionnaire.

(b) Do you know of any changes in the systems of internal accounting controls ofthe Company or any subsidiary that would result in a negative answer to any of thequestions set forth in paragraph (a) above when applied to the Company’s last three(3) fiscal years or to the Company’s current fiscal year?

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

B-51

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (252)

(c) Are you aware of any disagreements between the Company and its account-ants?151

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(d) Are you aware of any management letters prepared by the accountants for theCompany identifying any reportable conditions?

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

QUESTION 44. Director Independence and Qualifications152 (Directors andDirector Nominees Only)

(a) Have you or any family member been employed within the past three (3) yearsby the Company or any parent or subsidiary of the Company?153

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If your answer is “YES,” please describe:

(b) [Have you or has any family member accepted, either directly orindirectly, compensation in any form from the Company or any parent or sub-sidiary of the Company in excess of $120,000 during any period of twelve(12) consecutive months within the past three (3) years? Do not includecompensation for board or committee service, compensation paid to a familymember who is a non-executive employee of the Company or any parent or sub-sidiary of the Company, benefits under a tax-qualified retirement plan, and non-discretionary compensation. Note that excluded compensation to family members

151 Schedule 14A, Items 9(d), 13(a)(4) and 14, and Instruction 7(d)(9) to Item 14; Form 10-K, Item 9.See Regulation S-K, Item 304.

152 This question covers only Nasdaq and NYSE director independence requirements. If the Company islisted on another exchange, please supplement with other relevant requirements accordingly. Please notethat pursuant to Schedule 14A, Item 7(d) and Item 407(d)(2) of Regulation S-K, if the Company’s boardof directors has appointed a “non-independent” director as a member of the Company’s audit committee,the Company is required to disclose the nature of the relationship that makes such director notindependent and the reason for the board of directors’ determination to appoint such person to theCompany’s audit committee.

153 Rule 5605(a)(2) of the Nasdaq Marketplace Rules; NYSE Listed Company Manual § 303A.02(b)(i) andcommentary thereto; and Exchange Act Rule 10A-3(b)(1)(ii). See also Schedule 14A, Item 7(c); Regulation S-K, Item 407(a); and Nasdaq Marketplace Rule 5605(c)(2)(A) (applicable to audit committee members). Notethat service as an interim executive officer of the listed company does not disqualify a director from beingconsidered independent. See IM 5605 Definition of Independence – Rule 5605(a)(2) of the Nasdaq Market-place Rules and NYSE Listed Company Manual § 303A.02(b)(i) and commentary thereto.

B-52

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (253)

should still be disclosed in Question 28.154] [Have you or any family memberreceived during any twelve-month period within the last three (3) years, morethan $120,000 in direct compensation from the Company or any parent or sub-sidiary of the Company (other than director and committee fees and pension orother forms of deferred compensation for prior service, provided that such com-pensation is not contingent in any way on continued service)? You need not con-sider compensation received by a director for former service as an interimexecutive officer. Also, do not consider compensation received by immediate fam-ily members for service as a non-executive employee of the Company or anyparent or subsidiary of the Company. You need not consider individuals who areno longer family members as a result of legal separation or divorce, or those whohave died or become incapacitated.155]

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If your answer is “YES” to either question, please describe:

(c) Is any family member currently, or has any family member been within thepast three (3) years, employed by the Company or by any parent or subsidiary of theCompany as an executive officer?156 [You need not consider individuals who are nolonger family members as a result of legal separation or divorce, or those whohave died or become incapacitated.157]

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If your answer is “YES,” please name such family member and indicate theexecutive officer position.

154 Rule 5605(a)(2)(B) of the Nasdaq Marketplace Rules. See also Schedule 14A, Item 7(c). See alsoRegulation S-K, Item 407(a).

155 NYSE Listed Company Manual § 303A.02(b)(ii) and commentary thereto.156 Rule 5605(a)(2) (C) of the Nasdaq Marketplace Rules and NYSE Listed Company Manual §

303A.02(b)(i) and commentary thereto. See Schedule 14A, Item 7(c). See also Regulation S-K,Item 407(a).

157 NYSE Listed Company Manual, General Commentary to Section 303A.02(b).

B-53

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (254)

(d) [Are you, or is a family member, a partner, controlling shareholder orexecutive officer of any entity or organization (including law firms158 and charitableentities) to which the Company or any parent or subsidiary of the Company made,or from which the Company or any parent or subsidiary of the Company received,payments in the current or in any of the past three (3) fiscal years for property orservices (other than payments which arose solely from investments in the securitiesof the Company or any parent or subsidiary of the Company and payments undernon-discretionary charitable contribution matching programs) that exceed fivepercent (5%) of the recipient’s consolidated gross revenue for that year, or$200,000, whichever is greater?159] [(1) Are you currently an employee of anotherentity (including any charitable organization) that has made payments to, or hasreceived payments from, the Company or any parent or subsidiary of the Companyfor property or services in an amount which, in any of the last three (3) fiscal years,exceeds the greater of $1,000,000 or 2% of such other entity’s consolidated grossrevenues; (2) Is any family member currently an executive officer of another entity(including any charitable organization) that has made payments to, or has receivedpayments from, the Company or any subsidiary for property or services in anamount which, in any of the last three (3) fiscal years, exceeds the greater of$1,000,000 or 2% of such other entity’s consolidated gross revenues?160 You neednot consider individuals who are no longer family members as a result of legal sepa-ration or divorce, or those who have died or become incapacitated.]

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If your answer is “YES” to either question, please describe:

(e) [Are you or is a family member presently employed as an executive officerof another entity where any of the executive officers of the Company or anyparent or subsidiary of the Company have served on the compensation committee(or other body performing similar functions) of such other entity in the currentyear or any of the past three (3) years?161] [Are you or is any family member cur-rently, or within the last three (3) years have you or has any family member been,

158 See IM-5605 of the Nasdaq Marketplace Rules.159 Rule 5605(a)(2)(D) of the Nasdaq Marketplace Rules. See also Schedule 14A, Item 7(c). See also

Regulation S-K, Item 407(a).160 NYSE Listed Company Manual § 303A.02(b)(v) and commentary thereto. See also Schedule 14A,

Item 7(c). See also Regulation S-K, Item 407(a).161 Rule 5605(a)(2)(E) of the Nasdaq Marketplace Rules. See also Regulation S-K, Item 407(e).

B-54

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (255)

an executive officer of another entity where any of the present executive officers ofthe Company or any parent or subsidiary of the Company at the same time serveor served on the other entity’s compensation committee (or board of directors orother committee performing similar functions)?162 You need not considerindividuals who are no longer family members as a result of legal separation ordivorce, or those who have died or become incapacitated.]

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If your answer is “YES,” please describe:

(f) [Are you or is any family member a current partner of the outside auditor ofthe Company or any parent or subsidiary of the Company, or have you or has anyfamily member been a partner or employee of the outside auditor in the past three(3) years and worked on the audit of the Company or any parent or subsidiary ofthe Company during that time?163] [(1) Are you or a family member a current part-ner of a firm that is the internal or external auditor of the Company or any parentor subsidiary of the Company; (2) Are you a current employee of such a firm; (3) doyou have a family member who is a current employee of such a firm and personallyworks on the audit of the Company or any parent or subsidiary of the Company; or(4) were you or a family member within the last three (3) years (but no longer) apartner or employee of such a firm and personally worked on the audit of theCompany or any parent or subsidiary of the Company during that time?164]

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If your answer is “YES,” please describe:

(g) Except as already noted elsewhere in the Questionnaire, to assist the Companyin determining your independence pursuant to the Exchange Act, have you accepted atany time, or is there any proposed arrangement for you to accept, either directly orindirectly, any consulting, advisory or other compensatory fee from the Company or

162 NYSE Listed Company Manual § 303A.02(b)(iv) and commentary thereto. See also Regulation S-K,Item 407(e).

163 Nasdaq Marketplace Rule 5605(a)(2)(F).164 Section 303A.02(b)(iii) of the NYSE Listed Company Manual.

B-55

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (256)

any of its subsidiaries?165 For purposes of this question, “indirect” includes acceptanceof such a fee by your spouse, minor children or stepchildren, and any of your childrenand stepchildren that share a home with you.166 It also includes acceptance of such afee by any entity that provides accounting, consulting, legal, investment banking orfinancial advisory services to the Company or any of its subsidiaries and in which youare a partner, member or officer, or in which you occupy a similar position; provided,however, that it does not include entities in which you are a limited partner or non-managing member, or those for which you occupy similar positions where you have noactive role in providing services to the entity.

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If your answer is “YES,” please provide a description, including amounts paidor payable on your behalf:

(h) [Compensation Committee] Members only – The Company’s board mustconsider your sources of compensation in determining your independence and eligi-bility to serve as a member of the [Insert Name of Compensation Committee]. Thisincludes consideration of whether you receive compensation from any other person orentity that would impair your ability to be independent of management in connectionwith the duties of a compensation committee member or make independent judgmentsabout the Company’s executive compensation. For this purpose, please identify anysources of your compensation (other than any compensation identified in response toany other question in this Questionnaire) that could impair your ability to makeindependent judgments about the Company’s executive compensation.167

165 Exchange Act Rule 10A-3(b)(1)(ii)(A) and Exchange Act Rule 10C-1(b)(1)(ii)(A). Nasdaq Market-place Rule 5605(c)(2)(A)(ii) makes compliance with this SEC rule, along with all of the independencerequirements of Exchange Act Rule 10A-3(b)(1), an explicit requirement for all audit committee mem-bers. While the NYSE and Nasdaq do not have a similar bright-line test for compensation committeeindependence, NYSE Listed Company Manual § 303A.02(a)(ii)(A) and revised Nasdaq Marketplace Rule5605(d) make this a consideration the board of directors should take into account when determiningindependence for purposes of compensation committee members.

166 See SEC Release No. 34-47654, Section I.A.2.167 Rule 5605(d)(2); NYSE Listed Company Manual § 303A.02

B-56

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (257)

(i) Please indicate whether any of the following relationships exist:168

(i) Do you own or control, directly or indirectly, more than 10% of any class ofthe Company’s voting securities?

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(ii) Are you an executive officer, employee, general partner or managingmember of the Company or any of its affiliates?

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

(iii) Are you otherwise an affiliate of the Company or any of its affiliates (otherthan in your capacity as a member of the Company’s board of directors)? (Please con-sider any current or past relationship, circ*mstance, agreement or arrangement pur-suant to which you or an entity in which you are an officer, general partner ormanaging member could be deemed to be an affiliate of the Company or any of itsaffiliates.)

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If your answer is “YES” to any of these questions, please state the reason(s):

(j) [Have you participated in the preparation of the financial statements ofthe Company or any of its current subsidiaries at any time during the past three(3) years?169]

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If your answer is “YES,” please describe:

168 Rule 5605(c)(2)(A)(ii) of the Nasdaq Marketplace Rules; NYSE Listed Company Manual §303A.06; Exchange Act Rules 10A-3(b)(1)(ii)(B) and 10A-3(e)(1)(iii). Please note that Nasdaq“recommends” that a listed company disclose in its proxy statement if any director is deemed independentbut falls outside the safe harbor provisions of Exchange Act Rule 10A-3(e)(1)(ii). See IM-5605-4 of theNasdaq Marketplace Rules. NYSE Listed Company Manual § 303A.06(b) requires that all audit commit-tee members meet both the requirements of Exchange Act Rule 10A-3(b)(1) and the requirements ofNYSE Listed Company Manual § 303A.02.

169 Rule 5605(c)(2)(A)(iii) of the Nasdaq Marketplace Rules.

B-57

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (258)

(k) Please identify and describe any material relationship you or any of your fam-ily members currently have (or have had within the past three years) with any chari-table organization or other non-public entity. Such relationships may include, but arenot limited to, relationships as a partner, controlling shareholder, director or executiveofficer of the applicable organization or entity. Please include in your response thename of the applicable organization or entity, your relationship thereto and the appli-cable dates of such relationship.170

(l) Please identify and describe any relationships you have with any other directoror executive officer of the Company (other than serving as a director of the Company),whether personal or professional. This could include serving in some capacity in a chari-table organization or other non-public entity, overlapping membership in an associationor club and any other relationship in which you periodically interact with such person.171

(m) Please provide any additional information that would be relevant, appropriateor helpful for the Company’s board of directors to consider when evaluating your abil-ity to exercise independent judgment in carrying out the responsibilities of a directorand when determining whether you qualify as “independent” within the meaning ofthat term under the federal securities laws and the rules of [Nasdaq] [the NYSE].172

Please include in your response any information regarding relationships between you,

170 This question permits the Company to inquire about overlapping affiliations as a component of itsgeneral independence review. See, e.g., the concerns raised in In re Oracle Corp. Derivative Litig., 808A.2d 1206 (Del. Ch. 2002), summary judgment granted for defendant directors by, In re Oracle Corp.Derivative Litig., 2004 Del. Ch. LEXIS 177 (Del. Ch. Nov. 24, 2004). Note: the questionnaire could berevised to provide to the respondents a list of entities to which the Company donates, with a question tothe respondents inquiring whether they have any relationships with any of the listed entities.

171 This question also addresses concerns raised in In re Oracle Corp. Derivative Litig., 808 A.2d 1206(Del. Ch. 2002), summary judgment granted for defendant directors by, In re Oracle Corp. DerivativeLitig., 2004 Del. Ch. LEXIS 177 (Del. Ch. Nov. 24, 2004).

172 Rule 5605(a)(2) of the Nasdaq Marketplace Rules; NYSE Listed Company Manual § 303A.02 andcommentary thereto. See also Regulation S-K, Item 407(a)(3), which requires disclosure of the types oftransactions, relationships or arrangements, if any, that were not disclosed pursuant to Item 404(a) butwhich the board considered in determining that the particular director was independent under the relevantlisting standards.

B-58

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (259)

your family members or your associates on one hand, and the Company or any of itsaffiliates on the other hand, that has not been fully described elsewhere in the Ques-tionnaire. Such relationships may be either direct or as a partner, member, shareholderor officer of an organization or entity that has a material relationship with the Com-pany or any of its affiliates. Further, such relationships can include commercial,industrial, banking, consulting, legal, accounting, charitable and familial relationships,among others.

QUESTION 45. Financial Experience and Expertise (Directors and DirectorNominees Only)

The Company is required pursuant to the Exchange Act to determine and disclosewhether it has at least one “audit committee financial expert” (as defined by the SEC)serving on its audit committee.173 Additionally, the Company’s audit committeemembers must meet certain minimum financial experience and expertise thresholdspursuant to [Nasdaq] [NYSE] rules. Please respond to the following questions andrequests if you are currently a member of the Company’s audit committee or if youmay be eligible to serve on the audit committee in the future.

(a) Are you able to read and understand fundamental financial statements, includ-ing the Company’s balance sheet, income statement, and cash flow statement?174

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

173 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 407(d)(5) and instructionsthereto (which clarify that the disclosure is only required in a registrant’s annual report). NYSE ListedCompany Manual § 303A.12(c) requires the Company to submit an executed Written Affirmation to theNYSE annually and each time there is a change in the board or in any of these committees: nominating/corporate governance, compensation and audit. Nasdaq Marketplace Rule 5605(c)(4) requires the Com-pany to provide notice to Nasdaq immediately upon learning of noncompliance with audit committeerequirements; Rule 5625 requires prompt notification to Nasdaq when an executive officer becomes awareof material noncompliance with the Rule 5600 Series.

174 Rule 5605(c)(2)(A)(iv) of the Nasdaq Marketplace Rules. Although this qualification is onlyrequired for members of the Company’s audit committee, it is advisable for the board to know whichmembers would be eligible to serve on the Company’s audit committee if the need arose. Additionally, thecommentary to NYSE Listed Company Manual § 303A.07(a) states that each member of the auditcommittee must become financially literate (if not already literate) within a reasonable period of time afterhis or her appointment to the audit committee.

B-59

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (260)

(b) Please describe any past employment experience in finance or accounting orany other comparable experience, education or background in finance or accounting(including whether you have previously served as a chief executive officer, chieffinancial officer or other senior officer with financial oversight responsibilities).175

(c) To assist the Company’s board of directors in determining whether you meetthe definition of an “audit committee financial expert,” please list below any experi-ence that may be helpful in the board’s determination. Pursuant to SEC rules, an “auditcommittee financial expert” is a person who has each of the following attributes176:

(i) An understanding of generally accepted accounting principles and financialstatements;

(ii) The ability to assess the general application of such principles in con-nection with the accounting for estimates, accruals and reserves;

(iii) Experience preparing, auditing, analyzing or evaluating financial state-ments that present a breadth and level of complexity of accounting issues that aregenerally comparable to the breadth and complexity of issues that can reasonably beexpected to be raised by the Company’s financial statements, or experience activelysupervising one or more persons engaged in such activities;

(iv) An understanding of internal controls and procedures for financial report-ing; and

(v) An understanding of audit committee functions.

In your response, please address whether the above-listed qualifications wereobtained through any of the following means:

(A) Education and experience as a principal financial officer, principalaccounting officer, controller, public accountant or auditor, orexperience in one or more positions that involve the performanceof similar functions;

175 Rule 5605(c)(2)(A) of the Nasdaq Marketplace Rules; NYSE Listed Company Manual § 303A.07(a)and commentary thereto.

176 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 407(d)(5)(ii) and (iii).Note that the safe harbor described by Regulation S-K, Item 407(d)(5)(iv) emphasizes that a designationof audit committee financial expert does not impose additional duties, obligations or liability on the direc-tor; this information may be important to the directors filling out the questionnaire.

B-60

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (261)

(B) Experience actively supervising a principal financial officer,principal accounting officer, controller, public accountant, auditoror person performing similar functions;

(C) Experience overseeing or assessing the performance of companiesor public accountants with respect to the preparation, auditing orevaluation of financial statements; or

(D) Other relevant experience that would be appropriate for theCompany’s board of directors to consider in determining yourfinancial literacy or sophistication.

(d) [Do you currently serve, or have you been selected for future service, onan audit committee of any public company besides the Company?]177

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If your answer is “YES,” please list the name of each public company on whoseaudit committee you currently or will serve.

QUESTION 46. Iran Sanctions178

Under the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012 (ITRA) theCompany is required to disclose in its annual or quarterly filings under the ExchangeAct whether it, or any affiliate, has during the period covered by the report knowinglyengaged in any activity prohibited by the ITRA.

177 NYSE Listed Company Manual § 303A.07(a) and commentary thereto.178 The Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012 (ITRA) requires any company that

must file annual or quarterly reports under Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act to disclose in those reportswhether, during the period covered by the subject report, it or any affiliate has knowingly engaged in cer-tain sanctionable activities under the act. The company may prefer to utilize a different means to solicitthis information from directors and officers and therefore omit it from this questionnaire. Note also thatITRA requires disclosure of any sanctionable activities under the act in quarterly as well as annual reports,so annual solicitation of this information may not be sufficient for the company’s needs.

B-61

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (262)

Are you aware of the Company, or any affiliate, knowingly engaging in anyof the following activities during the past 2 years?

• Development of Iran’s petroleum resources, production of refined petroleumproducts in or exportation of refined petroleum products from Iran, or devel-opment of Iran’s weapons of mass destruction (WMD) or other militarycapabilities;

• Transactions with financial institutions facilitating terrorist organizations oracts, sanctioned-party activities, WMD development or other prohibitedactivities in Iran as described in the Comprehensive Iran Sanctions,Accountability, and Divestment Act of 2010 (CISADA);

• Transactions with financial institutions engaging in transactions benefittingthe Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps, as described in Section 104(d)(1) ofCISADA;

• Transfers of goods or technologies to Iran that are likely to be used to com-mit human rights abuses;

• Transactions with terrorists whose property is blocked pursuant to ExecutiveOrder 13224;

• Transactions with WMD proliferators whose property is blocked pursuant toExecutive Order 13382; and

• Transactions with the government of Iran as defined in Section 560.405 ofTitle 31 of the Code of Federal Regulations, without specific authorizationof the government of the United States.

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If your answer is “YES,” please provide any information relevant, appropriateor helpful in the Company’s evaluation of its obligations under the ITRA.

B-62

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (263)

REPORTING OBLIGATIONS

QUESTION 47. Reporting Obligations179

If you are an executive officer, director or owner of 10% of any class of theCompany’s equity securities, you are subject to the reporting requirements of Sec-tion 16(a) of the Exchange Act and the rules promulgated thereunder. These rules mayrequire you to file, within forty-five (45) days of the end of the Company’s fiscal year,an Annual Statement of Changes in Beneficial Ownership on Form 5 with the SECreflecting certain of your transactions in the Company’s equity securities.

It is not necessary to make this annual Form 5 filing if: (i) you have not engagedin any transactions in the Company’s equity securities during the past year whichrequire annual reporting on Form 5, or if you have made a prior, voluntary disclosureof such transactions on Form 4 prior to the date the Form 5 is due; and (ii) you have noholdings or transactions which you were otherwise required to report during FiscalYear [Insert Last Fiscal Year] and which were not reported to the SEC.

NOTE: If you have already returned a separate Form 5 Certification orprovided a Form 5 to the Company, you do not need to complete this question.

(a) On the basis of a review of all transactions in the Company’s equity securitiesduring Fiscal Year [Insert Last Fiscal Year] and all filings made by you or on yourbehalf with the SEC during such period, are you required to file a Form 5 with theSEC for the past fiscal year? (Answering “No” shall constitute your representationthat no Form 5 filing is required, and your agreement that the Company mayretain this Questionnaire and provide it to the SEC upon request.)

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

If you answered “YES,” please state the transactions that should be reported tothe SEC.

(b) Did you file any reports on Form 3 or Form 4 later than the deadline for filingsuch reports during Fiscal Year [Insert Last Fiscal Year] or any prior fiscal year(excluding any late reports that have previously been disclosed in the Company’sproxy statements)?

ANSWER: YES ‘ NO ‘

179 Form 10-K, Item 10; Schedule 14A, Item 7(b). See Regulation S-K, Item 405.

B-63

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (264)

If you answered “YES,” please state the details of the transaction or provide thedate on which the late Form 3 or Form 4 report was filed with the SEC.

If any information furnished by me in this questionnaire becomes inaccurate,incomplete or otherwise changes, I will promptly advise the Company to thateffect and furnish any supplementary information that may be appropriate as aresult of any developments, including the passage of time and any new relation-ships that may develop in the future.

The foregoing answers are correctly and fully stated to the best of my knowledge,information and belief after a reasonable investigation.

Date Signature of Officer or Director

Print Name:

B-64

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (265)

DEFINITIONS

An affiliate is a person or entity that directly or indirectly through one or moreintermediaries controls, is controlled by, or is under common control with, anotherperson or entity. The Company’s executive officers would be considered affiliates ofthe Company.

Arrangement includes any contract, arrangement, agreement or understanding,whether written or oral.

Associate includes: (i) any corporation or entity (other than the Company) ofwhich you are an officer, director or partner or of which you are, directly or indirectly,the beneficial owner of 10% or more of any class of equity securities; (ii) any trust orother estate in which you have a substantial beneficial interest or as to which you serveas trustee or in a similar capacity; (iii) your spouse; (iv) any relative of your spouse orany relative of yours who has the same home as you or who is a director or officer orkey executive of the Company; and (v) any partner, syndicate member or person withwhom you have agreed to act in concert with respect to the acquisition, holding, votingor disposition of shares of the Company’s securities.

A beneficial owner of a security includes:

(i) any person who, directly or indirectly, through any contract, arrangement, under-standing, relationship or otherwise has or shares:

(a) voting power, which includes the power to vote, or to direct the voting of,such security; and/or

(b) investment power, which includes the power to dispose, or to direct thedisposition of, such security.

(ii) any person who, directly or indirectly, creates or uses a trust, proxy, power ofattorney, pooling arrangement or any other contract, arrangement or device withthe purpose or effect of divesting such person of beneficial ownership; and

(iii) a person who has the right to acquire beneficial ownership of such security, asdefined in clause (i) above, within sixty (60) days, including but not limited toany right to acquire: (a) through the exercise of any option, warrant or right,(b) through the conversion of a security, (c) pursuant to the power to revoke atrust, discretionary account, or similar arrangement, or (d) pursuant to the auto-matic termination of a trust, discretionary account or similar arrangement.

Shares beneficially owned by you include not only securities you hold for yourown benefit, but also securities others hold for your benefit (regardless of whether or

B-65

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (266)

how they are registered) such as, for example, securities held for you by custodians,brokers, relatives, trustees, and securities held for your account by pledgees, securitiesowned by a partnership in which you are a general or limited partner, and securitiesowned by any corporation which is or should be regarded as a personal holding corpo-ration of yours. Bonus award shares held by a plan trustee, but as to which you castvotes and/or receive dividends, are deemed beneficially owned notwithstandingwhether or not your complete rights in such shares have vested.

Change in control means a change in the possession, directly or indirectly, of thepower to direct or cause the direction of the management and policies of a person orthe Company, whether through the ownership of voting securities, by contract orotherwise.

A control person of a specified person or entity is a person who, directly orindirectly, through one or more intermediaries, controls the specified person or entity.

Equity Incentive Plan means any Incentive Plan or a portion of an Incentive Planunder which awards are granted that fall within the scope of Financial AccountingStandards Board’s Accounting Standards Codification No. 718, Stock Compensation,as modified or supplemented. Such awards generally would include stock awards(restricted or otherwise), stock option awards and any other equity instruments.

Executive officer means the president, principal financial officer, principalaccounting officer or controller, any vice president in charge of a principal businessunit, division or function (such as sales, administration or finance), any other officerwho performs a policy-making function or any other person who performs similarpolicy-making functions for the Company (or other entity that may be indicated).

Family member [means a person’s spouse, parents, children and siblings,whether by blood, marriage (including “in-law” relationships) or adoption, andanyone residing in the person’s home.180] [means a person’s spouse, parents, chil-dren, siblings, mothers and fathers-in-law, sons and daughters-in-law, brothersand sisters-in-law, and anyone (other than domestic employees) who shares theperson’s home. Family member does not include those who are legally separatedor divorced, who are incapacitated, or who have died.181] Please note that due todifferences between SEC rules and the rules of Nasdaq [the NSYE], the definitions offamily member and immediate family member are slightly different.

Immediate family member means a person’s child, stepchild, parent, stepparent,spouse, sibling, mother-in-law, father-in-law, son-in-law, daughter-in-law, brother-in-

180 Rule 5605(a)(2) of the NASD Marketplace Rules.181 General commentary to NYSE Listed Company Manual § 303A.02(b).

B-66

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (267)

law or sister-in-law of such person, and any other individual (other than a tenant oremployee) sharing the person’s household. Immediate family member includes (1) onlyindividuals who are currently related to the primary reporting person (e.g., a personwho is divorced from a director’s daughter would no longer be a son-in-law whosetransactions must be reported) and (2) only those persons who are related by blood orstep relationship to the primary reporting person or his or her spouse.182 Please notethat due to differences between SEC rules and the rules of Nasdaq [the NYSE], thedefinitions of family member and immediate family member are slightly different.

Incentive Plan means any plan providing compensation intended to serve asincentive for performance to occur over a specified period, whether such performanceis measured by reference to financial performance of the Company or an affiliate, theCompany’s stock price, or any other performance measure.

Member means any individual, partnership, corporation or other legal entityadmitted to membership in FINRA (formerly NASD), and any officer or partner ofsuch a member or the executive representative of such a member or the substitute forsuch a representative.

Non-Equity Incentive Plan means any incentive plan or portion of an incentiveplan that is not an Equity Incentive Plan.

Promoter includes:

(i) Any person who, acting alone or in conjunction with one or more other per-sons, directly or indirectly takes initiative in founding and organizing the business orenterprise of an issuer; or

(ii) Any person who, in connection with the founding and organizing of the busi-ness or enterprise of an issuer, directly or indirectly receives in consideration of serv-ices or property, or both services and property, 10% or more of any class of securitiesof the issuer or 10% or more of the proceeds from the sale of any class of such secu-rities. However, a person who receives such securities or proceeds either solely asunderwriting commissions or solely in consideration of property shall not be deemed apromoter within the meaning of this paragraph if the person does not otherwise takepart in founding and organizing the enterprise.

Related person means any director or executive officer of the Company, anydirector nominee, any immediate family member of a director or executive officer ofthe Company, any security holder who owns more than 5% of any class of the

182 Regulation S-K Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations, Interpretation 230.01.

B-67

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (268)

Company’s voting securities (i.e., common stock and preferred stock are treated asseparate classes), and any immediate family member of such a security holder.

SARs are stock appreciation rights payable in cash or stock, including SARs pay-able in cash or stock at the election of the Company or the holder.

Stock options includes all options, warrants, or rights to purchase securities of theCompany, other than those issued to security holders as such on a pro rata basis.

Subsidiary includes any company of which more than 50% of the voting sharesare owned by the Company.

Transaction includes, but is not limited to, any financial transaction, arrangementor relationship (including any indebtedness or guarantee of indebtedness) or any seriesof similar transactions, arrangements or relationships.

Underwriter includes an underwriter, underwriters’ counsel, financial consultantsand advisers, finders, members of the selling or distribution group, any member partic-ipating in the public offering and any and all other persons associated with or relatedto the foregoing.

B-68

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (269)

For more information, contact your RR Donnelley sales representative or go to:

1.800.424.9001www.rrdonnelley.comwww.financial.rrd.comHBProxy 2016

Copyright © 2015 R. R. Donnelley & Sons Company. All rights reserved.

Corporate Headquarters: 35 West Wacker Drive, Chicago, IL 60601

Printed by RR Donnelley

Global Products and Services

books . business communication services . business process outsourcing . catalogs . commercial, digital and variable print

content creation, management and distribution . content marketing . direct mail . directories . distribution, print fulfillment and kitting

document outsourcing and management . e-business solutions . financial printing and communications

forms, labels and office products . global packaging solutions . language solutions . logistics services . magazines

NFC, RFID, augmented reality, QR codes and barcoding . retail inserts . strategic creative services . supply chain management solutions

The P

roxy

Seaso

n F

ield

Guid

e S

ixth E

ditio

nM

orrison & Foerster LLP

/ Corporate Finance P

racticeT

he P

roxy

Seaso

n F

ield

Guid

e S

ixth E

ditio

nM

orrison & Foerster LLP

/ Corporate Finance P

ractice

The Proxy Season Field Guide The Proxy Season … PROXY SEASON FIELD GUIDE Acknowledgements: The Proxy Season Field Guide was prepared by the Corpo- rate Finance Practice of Morrison - [PDF Document] (2024)
Top Articles
Latest Posts
Article information

Author: Francesca Jacobs Ret

Last Updated:

Views: 6184

Rating: 4.8 / 5 (48 voted)

Reviews: 87% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Francesca Jacobs Ret

Birthday: 1996-12-09

Address: Apt. 141 1406 Mitch Summit, New Teganshire, UT 82655-0699

Phone: +2296092334654

Job: Technology Architect

Hobby: Snowboarding, Scouting, Foreign language learning, Dowsing, Baton twirling, Sculpting, Cabaret

Introduction: My name is Francesca Jacobs Ret, I am a innocent, super, beautiful, charming, lucky, gentle, clever person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.